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TheLonelySandPerson

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  1. TheLonelySandPerson

    Final Fantasy Ivalice

    That's correct. Per the standard Fantasy setting rules, Gunnery is not used in this setting, so any Gunnery-based attacks would be handled by Ranged. There's just not enough heavy weapons in the setting to justify making people buy a whole other skill for it. I'll add a note to that effect.
  2. TheLonelySandPerson

    Robots in disguise! Transformers for Genesys

    I see no reason that transforming should take more time than reloading a weapon or dashing across a room. This is what maneuvers are made for. Anyway, if you make it 2 maneuvers, you entirely remove the player's ability to, for example, transform and roll out -- you've spent your 2 maneuvers transforming, and even if you spend strain, you can't use another. If you want to increase the cost, make it an action, but don't take up both maneuvers.
  3. TheLonelySandPerson

    Robots in disguise! Transformers for Genesys

    I disagree. A panel's worth of action is fine for a maneuver, and we often see them transform on the run or in mid-jump in animated properties.
  4. TheLonelySandPerson

    Robots in disguise! Transformers for Genesys

    Oh, interesting. On page 4, it says "If you go over your stain threshold and suffer a critical hit you are forced back into your bot form." Was that supposed to be an "or"? I think you should separate the concepts of archetype and alt mode. You have several things that key off of archetype, like which talents you can take, but they're actually only interested in what your alt mode can do, and it would simplify the rules for Extra Form -- you don't have to mess with pretending you're another archetype, you just have an alt mode that qualifies for relevant talents. The Combiner talent needs a lot more work. First, is it saying you have to pay X story points to combine, where X is the number of robots involved? That seems excessive, and almost always out of reach. Instead, I'd make this cost 2 Story Points, limit it to once per session, and it only lasts until the end of the scene. It also doesn't explain who takes control of the combiner, what happens when its wounds or strain exceed threshold or it takes a Crit, and so on. I'd also advise that it increases Silhouette by 1 if the combination involves 2-3 robots, and by 2 if it involves 4+. The combined robot should explicitly "take highest" for all its stats except Brawn and Intellect, too.
  5. TheLonelySandPerson

    Help Making Decision Re. Homebrew Campaign

    I see what you're going for here, but I always feel like using straight-up real-world cultures might come off as kind of disrespectful because I'm not immersed deep enough in most of them to avoid turning them into a handful of bullet points. It's probably safer to mash up aspects of two or three real cultures to produce something that's not clearly drawing from any particular one. Airbender did this well, where each of the races is kinda-sorta-vaguely recognizable as a real-world Asian culture but mostly just its own thing. Keying off of Bronze Age cultures may help this a lot, because they're largely far enough in the past to avoid stereotyping modern peoples. The Flame Riders sound more or less okay as a mashup of North African and Steppe cultures (maybe read up on the Numidians, who were Carthage's awesome cavalry) but you might add in the viking aspect here, making them a little more well-rounded. Remember, vikings were sea-mobile land raiders, not a proper navy. The water race might work better keying off of aspects of Phoenician and Pacific Islander rather than the explicitly violent vikings. The Phoenicians were essentially a culture of independent trading hubs linked by sea routes, so these guys can be the merchants, traders, and commerce-oriented types as well as able swimmers and naval combatants. The olive-to-green-scaly skin works fine here. For the air race, I think an Asian-esque culture could be fun, with the mythologicals having "skin as bright as day, hair as black as night". Most of them would trend darker than that, but retain dark hair and a sun-yellow cast to their complexion. I'd try to lean into the Himalayas cultures rather than coastal Japan and China, maybe borrowing some bits of India or Ayutthaya ("Siamese") culture, though I don't know what you're doing for the Earth guys. If you were going to incorporate European aspects into any of these, I'd advise looking into the Celtic, Gallic, and Frankish cultures rather than post-Roman Europe. And for the love of God don't cast Native Americans with nature powers! I'd also be kind of curious what happens where these cultures meet and blend -- is that where "average humans" come from?
  6. TheLonelySandPerson

    Crimson Skies

    I like the idea of using X-Wing for the air combat -- I once did the same thing using Crimson Skies with Savage Worlds for the non-air-combat stuff! But if you'd like a bit of advice, you could use real air combat names for the new maneuvers. I'd suggest using these: Curve = Lag Roll Powerslide = Barrel Roll Roll Out = Wingover Slide = Scissors (For what it's worth, the Koiogran Turn is an Immelmann Turn, Segnor's Loop is something like a Yo-Yo, and while the Tallon Roll is described like a barrel roll in the lore, in the game it functions more like a Chandelle.
  7. TheLonelySandPerson

    Final Fantasy Ivalice

    *Final Fantasy prelude music* The world is veiled in darkness. The wind stops, the sea is wild, and the earth begins to rot. The people wait, their only hope a prophecy... "When the world is in darkness, an author will come..." Download Final Fantasy Ivalice Hello, folks! This has been a long time coming. I've been working on this since before Terrinoth dropped, but the example set by the first Genesys setting book gave me a lot of... yeah, let's call it "inspiration". This is really intended as a general-purpose Final Fantasy setting, but since (for the sake of my sanity) that has to be based off of a particular world, I decided to go with Ivalice, with its numerous nonhuman species and appearance in multiple game series. It should be relatively portable, though you'll have to remove the k from the word "magick" a lot. Sorry, that's just how the setting is. I took an inclusive rather than exclusive view of content from other FF games -- for example, I attached the Feymarch to Ivalice, even though it's never mentioned explicitly. (We do see the traditional summons like Ifrit and Leviathan show up in FFTA2, though, and some of the lore entries in FFXII vaguely mention an "Otherworld" full of "demons".) I know there's a lot to go through here (I sooo did not expect this to turn into a 170-page book) so if you want to jump straight into the major changes from Genesys proper, check out these parts: Chapter 3: Mortal Races of Ivalice Chapter 5: Limit Breaks (While this borrows heavily from Terrinoth, there are a number of unique elements, so don't assume you've seen it all before.) Chapter 6: New Game Rules Chapter 7: Setting Skills (Especially the Magic Skills) Chapter 12: Magick (Especially Summoning) Summoning in particular needs some attention. Let me know if that section doesn't explain itself clearly enough -- the way it works is a little weird and I want to see if folks get it just based on the text before I start explaining myself. It's going to be powerful, and that's intentional, but I hope I've put enough limitations in place to keep it balanced with other options. While I playtested the system in a one-shot adventure and it seemed fine, I'd be especially appreciative of a wider perspective if anyone happens to get this on the table for a long-form campaign. And, of course, please call out any errors or formatting issues you see so I can correct them. Over the course of... uh... 54,000 words (God almighty...) I'm sure I've made some kind of mistakes.
  8. TheLonelySandPerson

    Final Fantasy Summoner

    I'm not terribly familiar with FFXIV. How would that change things? I mean, aside from summoning teeny, unimpressive versions of each monster.
  9. TheLonelySandPerson

    Final Fantasy Summoner

    Okay, I've been mulling over all these suggestions, and I think I've got a system I like. Try to find anything here that seems too powerful. The summoner casts a summoning spell with difficulty based on who they're summoning. This automatically includes the Summon Ally effect. The summon's Wound Threshold is increased by the net successes on the check. (Do you think that's too strong?) The summoner may call orders or let the summon act according to its nature. However, it won't use magic if they don't order it to. Each summon has a rival-class stat block which they use for non-magic actions. For magic actions, the summon has a list of what they can do. The spell is built normally, but may have limitations or bonus effects like an implement. The summoner pays the strain and rolls the spell with their Summoning skill, but their implements don't count. If the spell succeeds, they add their choice of SS, AA, or SA to the results. (This is what their strain-per-turn is buying.) Example: Ifrit is an easy, low-level summon, so his spell effects are pretty limited -- just Attack (Fire) and Augment. The summoner can spend a story point to go "off menu" as long as it's thematically appropriate. When the summoner uses the Concentrate maneuver, they take 1 strain. When the summoning spell expires (assuming the summon was not destroyed by damage), the summon performs its ultimate magic before departing. This is generally the effect you'd get in games that lack true summoning -- Ifrit uses Hellfire, Carbuncle uses Ruby Light, etc.
  10. TheLonelySandPerson

    Final Fantasy Summoner

    Only sort of. Again, the actions available to a summon are limited by the options on the menu. Genesys has a much broader menu to pick from.
  11. TheLonelySandPerson

    Final Fantasy Summoner

    So why CAN'T I ask Titan to hold up the roof?
  12. TheLonelySandPerson

    Final Fantasy Summoner

    Sorry, sent that a little prematurely. As for your other questions: Taking a couple maneuvers to turn into a different kind of mage isn't exactly a limitation. It still means they can do all the things the other characters can, they just need to take a turn off to switch over. The number of creatures is limited only by which summons are available in the game. In the later games, each summon can also only "belong" to one character, for what that's worth.
  13. TheLonelySandPerson

    Final Fantasy Summoner

    That's a good way to reframe the question. How can I limit an experienced summoner's narrative capabilities without making the summons feel excessively limited? (i.e. "Why can't I ask Titan to hold up the roof?") The early games provide that limitation by dint of each summon being a fixed spell with fixed effects, which are mostly limited to damage and a few specified status effects. The later games do it by giving you the choice of having a summon on the field OR your party, but not both, and the summon has 3-4 specified moves it can perform. FFXIV turns the summoner into a pet class with overall output comparable to the other classes, so I'm prepared to more or less ignore it. Don't get me wrong, it's a good class, but the feel is very different.
  14. TheLonelySandPerson

    Final Fantasy Summoner

    I think it leaves the same question as the original version -- what keeps the summoner from becoming supermage once they collect a summon for each spell type?
  15. TheLonelySandPerson

    Final Fantasy Summoner

    Well, I didn't think they did, per se, but one maneuver to sustain the spell and one to call the shots doesn't leave them much to do other than hold coats. At any rate, I'm setting true summoning aside as a limit break, so it doesn't need to be sustained and only vaguely balanced. (And, to be fair, Yuna really does just kinda stand there.) Oh, of course! If only I'd discussed that and presented the issues with it in my first post! Okay, sorry for the sarcasm, but I've been pondering this for a couple weeks already and all the easy solutions have issues. I didn't just run with that concept due to the difficulty in limiting the available effects when there's a dozen summons to be gathered and that's just the basic ones that appear in multiple games. (I'm fully anticipating GMs adding their own favorites to the list.) "Die" may be a strong word, but they can exceed their wound threshold and unsummon, yes. Nemeses would be far too strong for an already strong concept, though. They're weak-to-strong rivals for certain. Compared to, say, a druid summoning animals, the skills available to FF summons are extremely broad. I'm shying away from this concept mostly because it seems like it again turns the summoner into a multitool who always has a summon on tap that can do almost anything at least as well as anyone else on the team. This is why I'm eager to shuffle true summoning off into a limit break -- even if it outshines another player, it's only once per session.
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