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DurosSpacer

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  1. DurosSpacer

    Compare/Contrast Saga Edition and FFG Star Wars

    FFG did well to create three types of Core Rule Books. If you want an Ep. IV feel, then go with Edge. Want Force users everywhere? Play in the Old Republic where (seemingly) everyone throws force powers around? Then go with Force and Destiny. Want to do battle-scale events like a war game? Then do Age of Rebellion. I like that they make different little books (Clone Wars, Rebels, etc...) for different eras. With SAGA d20, it's one basic book with everything in it and you have to invent these eras. That said, the FFG books are awful at telling you how things work. One book says this item gets a boost to medicine checks, another book with the same item says nothing about that. And skill entries don't tell you all that can be done with a skill. You find some errant thread in the combat section and just don't have a place to turn to to know what a skill can do. Just awful.... SAGA more went with miniatures, grids, maps, hexes, and such. FFG is all abstract. Don't sweat the small stuff, whether you are 6 hexes away or 7 and having that determine if you hit or not. What a relief!! I dislike the force system entirely. I'd rather they had a different system for Old Republic days and then something different for Edge. One makes force powers hard to come by, the other makes it free-flowing. The complicated and arduous system has kept my group from even wanting to play force-users. If there's an area SAGA did well in, then in may have been the simplicity of the force system. One Skill and powers list D&D spell lists. In FFG, ONE power has about 12 potential upgrades each. Get 3-4 force powers and you'll have 36-48 options to keep track of whether you bought that upgrade or not. As far as background goes, I find that FFG throws out 440-page books when 200 pages would do. It tells you (repeatedly) about mundane stuff like about how Hutt worlds are full of dangerous gangsters. I find the older WEG modules to be more informative and concise.
  2. DurosSpacer

    Something other than the FaD FP System?

    Understood. But I think you misunderstood me about the sheets. One sheet per power, yes. But after you have 1-2 career trees and then 3, 4, 5, 6, 7.... Force Powers, you've got so much bookkeeping to keep up with (Tree upon Tree...). As you said, "use Move", and then (I say) flip-flip-flip-flip.....Where's that Move power sheet? So many trees....so many sheets...Did I buy that 5pt upgrade on Move? Or, was that Influence? Or, Sense? Etc... And, was that one upgrade or two? Range? Magnitude? Strength? Duration? Control? Ugh...... It'd be one thing if the powers were standardized, then Range upgrades would always mean engaged to short. Two Range upgrades mean medium, etc... You wouldn't have to look them up. But powers start off at different ranges. I think that's the letdown. You want to use Move, and in the spirit of the game there's most always 'a chance', but with the FP's there's no roll you can make to make it happen if you didn't purchase the 5pt upgrade. Seems counter to the flow of gameplay the system establishes. If you want to do something with skills or attacks, then just roll against a fistful of Purple Dice and see what happens. It could happen. Not absolutely anything, but most things could happen. Thanks for the thread links! Very on-topic!
  3. Had anyone considered running the Force Powers in FaD using a different system? The problem our group has (as players) is that the Force Power system in FaD is so bulky and complicated that you have to search pages and pages of FP Trees to see what magnitude, range, strength, duration, control, or mastery you may or may not have with one power or another. With at least 14 trees, it can get complicated quickly. It is a deterrent for us to even play FaD at all. As a bit of an absurd example, if my character wants to tell if a desired object exists across the room in the dark, know something about it, bring it over to me, up my coordination to use it, convince my friends to like it, prevent my enemies from seeing it, ... then it seems like that is about 8 trees to survey and check all that stuff on. Not to mention, it's an XP-siphon to split your XP in yet more ways. Wnat to get a few (basic) handy force powers? Then forget about having decent skills and talents. There has to be a better way. It would seem that maybe a spell point system would work better. You get a pool of power points equal to your xp (perhaps?) and then spend them (on the trees) to get what you want done. Do a lot of stuff, run out of powers (fatigued from using the force so much). Do something great, and it is tiring. Or, do a whole lot of simple stuff. Another option may be a SAGA Edition-like skill for using the force. Successes, Advantages, Triumphs, etc... all tell you how well you can use it. Some simple powers have a base +1 Success to them (like Move). The skill get's adjustments based on purchasing increases. Want to do something? Go ahead and try! Roll well enough and you can do it. The FFG narrative system seems to permeate through everything....until you reach the Force Powers. You can do what you want and let the dice results narrate how it looks. The base system is very free-flowing but the FP's are tree upon tree of searching for ways to make what you have work, rather than "I can move stuff with the force" and make a roll to see if you can lift your X-Wing out of the swamp. Any ideas out there? It's been years and my players (and I) never took to the force system. We were left utterly disappointed. It'd be a shame to let the book keep collecting dust.
  4. DurosSpacer

    Is it time to start a new game?

    Good question!!!! I (we) have run into this issue with about every new system we play. The "first" characters are a hodgepodge of stuff we add while getting used to the system. The Rise of the Separatists is a good excuse to make a second batch of characters. It's the right call, there. But, as you said, they're attached to them. Here's what you do (IMO). After deciding as a group that you want to play the Rise of the Sep setting with newly-made PC's, you set up a "Grand Finale" for the existing group. Something BIG. A series of 2-3-4 adventures to finish up that run of characters. This will give the Players some closure, a clean break from one to the other. Make it clear this is a do-or-die, let-the-dice-fall-where-they-may adventure series. Wrap all of that "mash-up" campaign into one ending. Maybe various foes join forces against them? The existing PC's will face their biggest foes, confront their biggest fears, and have a chance to conquer them all....or fail. They'll get to see how their "story" ends. Save the Rebellion? Defeat the Hutt? Take over a criminal organization? Pay off that bounty? End up in prison? Slaves in the spice mines? You can start with Obligations and take it from there. Wrap it all up! Now, this does NOT mean that they cannot come back to this group should they all want to do so, but they'd have a new beginning to start with. By the end of the Grand Finale, they'll either be standing victorious with no foes to oppose them, or be utterly defeated working in the spice mines of Kessel (for example). But either way, coming back would be a brand new beginning. Good luck!
  5. DurosSpacer

    Got a party transitioning away from Force stuff

    Had you considered whether "interested parties" (Sith & Jedi) would still want that power? I mean, a group has set out to find this great, lost power.....they go out for a time....and then stop pursuing jedi-Sith stuff altogether and drop out of sight. Some might say they gave up the search, but wouldn't some observers be suspicious that they had 'found' something great and made off with it? Suspicion and mistrust comes in where there's a void. Maybe they become more Edge but there's some sort of bounty "capture alive" on them. Now, they may not know why. They'd have to capture someone to find out why, maybe. As far as shifting focus, I often like to just throw things in a PC's way and then be ready to go whichever way the PC decides. An example is where a PC had befriended an NPC with hopes of climbing the corporate ladder. They become friends and the NPC asks if the PC will back him up when the time comes. That he has something big coming up. The PC agrees. Well, at a rooftop corporate outing, their boss and the them are out on a balcony by themselves and the NPC gives the PC a wink and a nod and them promptly pushes the supervisor through a (rigged) loose railing and over the side, plummeting to his death! The player (and PC) was totally shocked!!! It took a little while for the player to recover. After hearing the scream, onlookers came over and asked what happened. I left that in the hands of the PC/Player. After a few uncomfortable minutes of real time, the player blurts out, "Oh!!! He fell!!!" Later, the NPC was found to have been smuggling items out of the museum and the removal of the supervisor would better cover his tracks and allow him to steal more stuff (and replace them with fakes). The PC was a "It-belongs-in-a-museum-type" and thwarted his former friend's plans, having him arrested and lying about being involved at all.
  6. Good question! I think the most obvious example that comes to mind is the Imperial Officer. Dressed in officer clothes, he goes down like almost nothing. The PC's always target the officer, anyways. Squad Rules is almost a must. Browsing through the character descriptions, officers usually get something like Tactical Direction, Overwhelming Fire, Field Commander, etc... All the fellow Troopers getting free maneuvers (to aim) or free actions every round can help a lot. It also helps to add a 'second' officer to the mix. Have both of them bark out orders and give all the troopers double-boons. Another option is to not make the officer (or, easy target npc) available to target. He is behind a barrier giving orders, not on the front line. He'll last longer if he isn't a target on the battlefield. Lastly, when all his minions are gone, then have him surrender. It puts the PC's to the test, morally. Plus, its fun to berate & insult the PC's as they keep him along. The officers, after all, are more lawful-evil, not lawful-stupid (to use an old D&D saying). Why would they throw themselves into danger so easily? He has an estate back on Coruscant to look after. Looking forward to retirement some day, he is. The problem with adding on ranks of Adversary is that when you look in the books, people like Rebel Commanders get Adversary 2, so throwing it around all willy-nilly seems to be against the spirit of the game.
  7. DurosSpacer

    Cybernetics? No thanks!

    In addition, if you're fighting a mixed group of opponents and your weapon only does ion, then you're in trouble. I guess you could dual-wield, but that seems awkward. And, cybernetic eyes??? Who would do that? I guess it 'sounds cool', but who would ever voluntarily do that? Usually, only the crazy Gank. It's really only going to come into play if someone knows ahead of time that your have cybernetics. The basic premise here is that it is NOT wise to transform yourself into a droid in any way. If you lose an arm or leg in combat, then it is a liability. It is not a min-maxer's dream to gain that point of Brawn or Agility. I'm afraid Star Wars is a bit too realistic, in that respect. I know that sci-fi has all kinds of cool robot-human cyborgs, and such, but it is just not the Star Wars thing. Being partially droid is a liability, not a cool way to "power-up".
  8. DurosSpacer

    Play By Post: Autumn 2018

    PBP is slow enough that small ventures can take weeks or months in real time. How long is 'ongoing' in order to be mature? It is important to make PBP efforts direct and have them count. If a campaign is there to take on a Moff, then if you toil around with some small town stuff, before you know it you'll be 3 months into a PBP and not even be close to taking him on. While it may be building there, it takes far longer on PBP. That's not bad, but you just can't do small stuff that'd take 10 minutes at a tabletop, but 4 weeks in PBP. A good thing about a PBP site, is that you could play in multiple games at once. The pace with PBP is slow enough to balance playing in two or more games at one time, maximizing enjoyment and learning along the way. See SavBob's post above. I've been on Friends and Nemeses a few years. I get to play some, GM some, and deepen my understanding of the system and rules. Getting on a PBP site and joining in an existing (or new) game is best. The GM and players are already there. On this forum, you'll have to put out a request yourself and roll with what you get unless someone else has and opening and advertises such.
  9. DurosSpacer

    Interesting ideas for dangerous Imperial plots?

    The Empire has a penchant for eradicating cities or planets out of spite, or sometimes with a purpose. Anoat (gassed), Caamas (incendiary 'accident'), etc... Caamas had the Caamas Document, which proved an Imperial cause rather than an accident or Rebel cause, as it was claimed. So, you could have such proof, OR uncover plans for such a future genocide with a cool secret code name (Operation Dearborn). Their job can be to escape with the information to either prove, or prevent, the calamity.
  10. DurosSpacer

    Interesting ideas for dangerous Imperial plots?

    The Empire has a penchant for eradicating cities or planets out of spite, or sometimes with a purpose. Anoat (gassed), Caamas (incendiary 'accident'), etc... Caamas had the Caamas Document, which proved an Imperial cause rather than an accident or Rebel cause, as it was claimed. So, you could have such proof, OR uncover plans for such a future genocide with a cool secret code name (Operation Dearborn). Their job can be to escape with the information to either prove, or prevent, the calamity.
  11. DurosSpacer

    Interesting ideas for dangerous Imperial plots?

    The Empire has a penchant for eradicating cities or planets out of spite, or sometimes with a purpose. Anoat (gassed), Caamas (incendiary 'accident'), etc... Caamas had the Caamas Document, which proved an Imperial cause rather than an accident or Rebel cause, as it was claimed. So, you could have such proof, OR uncover plans for such a future genocide with a cool secret code name (Operation Dearborn). Their job can be to escape with the information to either prove, or prevent, the calamity.
  12. DurosSpacer

    Interesting ideas for dangerous Imperial plots?

    The Empire has a penchant for eradicating cities or planets out of spite, or sometimes with a purpose. Anoat (gassed), Caamas (incendiary 'accident'), etc... Caamas had the Caamas Document, which proved an Imperial cause rather than an accident or Rebel cause, as it was claimed. So, you could have such proof, OR uncover plans for such a future genocide with a cool secret code name (Operation Dearborn). Their job can be to escape with the information to either prove, or prevent, the calamity.
  13. DurosSpacer

    I need a gun. A really big gun.

    Your PC's will "meet" him alright. Round One, PC's win initiative because of someone's great Presence score and the bad guy is defeated before he ever gets off a shot. PC's get the weapon. Best case seems to be that the bad guy gets one shot off before dying in Round Two as the PC's team up on him. This ain't World of Warcraft or KOTOR.
  14. DurosSpacer

    HELP, please!

    This statement alone is a disqualifier. It is activist code-speak for, "Believe in my cause (now!) or you are just as guilty." No thanks. Looks like he only wants to pursue his cause and everyone else is wrong. I don't see how that works for a group. How's he going to deal with the group's inaction to free Wookiees when they are going through Arda1?
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