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LordBritish

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  1. I just chark it down to expansionist syndrome. Back then jabba was just a typical gangster with a makeover. Then they gave them a small empire and chucked tons of stuff on top of that. In universe explanation? He delegated all the real works to plebs and chilled out in his holiday home. Boom, I’ve solved the EU and gave that skill in his palace a backstory! XD
  2. I’ve got 9 different force powers. Then again we’ve been playing for 5 years. Generally: Force powers that enhance checks (influence, enhance, Foresee) are super popular. They also take the drama out of said checks, but that’s fine given the GM usually throws challenges at us. move object is pretty popular but most of us avoid taking it. Never really vocalised why. misdirect, Surpress and farsight I have, but see so little use most of the time that they might as well not exist. Though, I’ve made an incredible amount of use out of farsight as a blind PC, and I’ve used the remote sight features to some incredible effects, including tracking conversations and spying without committing to a full adventure.
  3. Aye I certainly see it as possible, just at what point do you start eroding ones sense of self? That one time that supervisor you looked up to thoughts just for the briefest of moments that he thought his buddy was an a kriffer, or a worker comes home one day being unable to recognise his own family because he spent so much time at work immersed in the thoughts of others? For space wizards they probably have to have a strong sense of self to even do this, but the average joe and Jane probably don’t have the safeguards to withstand extended exposure without some consequence. Hive minding a group of people does have its dangers, which is possibly why it’s limited to battle, since the alternative is dying or evil regimes that care about productivity first. Plenty of potential for some unnerving dystopian settings. I should write that down! XD
  4. I had it in my head that the younglings he captured would mostly go on to become the inquisition, an order of diet dark sliders who were raised to be hunting hounds and not much else. Kinda telling that in Rebels the Grand Inquisitor seemed to have biggest pressence of all of them; he knew whom he used to be, but now all he is Vader’s number two in a comparatively small field. Hands of the Emperor is also an idea, especially if we are onboard with the idea of Sidious wanting to raise people in indebted servitude to him. Especially interesting for a post Endor campaign where Jakku basically makes the resulting power struggle between warlords a fractured mess. Looking how Romans dealt with succession crisis’s is fun. then again, I am in a campaign where one of our nemesis’s cloned a small army (roughly 260!) of one of our PC’s that used to be his student. So we would typically fight six of these pack hunters at a time within our darkest hours. Ended up eventually storming the facility and now she is literally beside herself with an impromptu family of... herself. XD
  5. I ended up laughing for a minute straight. Sorry about that? I hadn't even looked at how I spelt it. Yes, it's Five Torches deep. A pun on middle earth, rather then other innuendo. XD
  6. 5 touches Deep also is a decent supplement for an immersive 5e/OSR styled experience, which is more about limited player capabilities in favour of making for a grittier experience. It caps at 9th level but is just a more refined rule set then the cluster buggery of spells that I find modern DND to be.
  7. A Stealth Star Destroyer. Sil 7. It was after a long string of battles seizing the fortress of Jakku having fired the Galaxy gun on the Imperial Fleet. We found it as one of several projects kept down there. We kept it and used it to great effect later in the same battle to defend the first wave of the full landing party face off against a small fleet of dreadnorts and a Venator. Capital Ship combat is surprisingly intense. The biggest ship I've personally hijacked is a Super Star Destroyer. Additively, I only held onto captaincy of it for a few seconds; Cobra Talon Bane had just failed a check to intimidate him into handing it over with the Pirate talent, so I used now the Master to Copy the talent, used it successfully, took the imperial Cap from the Captain and, after holding onto it for a couple of seconds, put it on Cobra's domed Helmet. He was after all, providing leading a couple hundred smugglers and I was just a singular force Emergent with one friend. It was a funny scene though and my character sometimes drops it as one of the many stories that is dismissed as a complete fabrication.
  8. Pretty much the above. Usually the force “ripple” isn’t detectable unless it’s being used, the effect being used is massive, or the individual has a personal connection with that individual and a method to detect them detecting force users pre-emptively is pretty much the domain of sense and Foresee. If they don’t use either, then they would be largely unaware are they aren’t sensitive toward the tell tale signs. If they have foresee I would totally hint toward this encounter in a very abstract way. A rusted knight stepping out of the shadows, a bright blue blade springing into motion.
  9. Alternatively, only a fool would sit in a village waiting for death, when a prepared party could do any of numbed of things; training the villagers to fight is effectively a trope of this kind of setting. The villagers have to rescue themselves. setting up ambushes and skirmishing. Unless the droids set up right on the doorstep of the camp, likely they have made camp a couple miles away. What lies between them? Dense vegetation? Ravines they have to cross or natural valleys that form a choke point? What surrounds the village? Would it be possible to erect a fortification? what stops the villagers from simply moving? Have an answer to this question prepared as that’s what the party will enevitibly ask, or are the droids intent on exterminating all organic life, no matter how far they run? is there any nearby settlements or old contacts that can be used to generate support?
  10. I printed off the trees, a custom sheet for space craft/speeders, force powers e.c.t I've got an entire book given over to equipment and notes. This can be a fairly crunch intensive system as far as talents can go so keeping good notes is super important. I personally have much less interest in a "freeform" tiered system of talents because I'm a visual person, I've got very little interest in physically writing out every one of my hundred talents at this point when I've already got nice coloured charts that shows everyone precisely what I got. All I can say is have a good feel for what your character can do and be fairly clear with what your character specialises in. If that obscure talent is something you regularly forgets, then it isn't really important to the character just a bit of extra chaft that regularly gets forgotten. For example, Tobin F.in Stryder is a masterful artisan and a force emergent assassin whom is attempting to teach future generations not to live in anger. In super short, he's sneaky, got a lot of skills in deception, stealth, has a singular lightsaber tree and had brought into teacher so that he could use the large amount of skill ranks to make other characters better. I've got trees in bounty hunter, assassin, Emergant, Artisan, At Striker and Teacher and 8/9 force powers at various levels of mastery. I probably only use about 15% of my character's talents in a given session, so I don't sweat the small details of forgetting I can reroll a machanics, or having the basic heal/harm, and I've probably only used Now the Master about 1 in 3 sessions due to the large group size and a super need never really coming up. As long as I know exactly what my character is great at I don't mind anything else. Truth be told I don't even remember the star fighting rules, or a lot of the extra stuff; Tobin wouldn't know how to fly in a squadron since he's only occasionally stolen something so it simply isn't important for me as a player to know. What I would do however is noting talents that are used regularly. I know I've got 4 ranks in dodge, 3 ranks in parry and 2 in reflect. Having that included on the main page on the edge of my character sheet reduces the amount of flipping I have to do since it's right there above my strain/wound total. I imagine part of the reason "Now the master" exists is so that wise mentor type characters can pretty much do whatever the PC's can do, without necessarily having to sink thousands of xp and murdering a whole tree just to replicate the decades of knowledge they apparently have. Then again; I'm also of the opinion that characters stagnate when they aren't actively adventuring.
  11. and closer to episode 3, the less Jedi there will be. XD
  12. They would probably take it pretty seriously, but I also imagine they would be fairly unwilling to allot much of their force to it; there is a war on that is demanding pretty much all their attention so being able to respond to a dark sider that seems to not be affiliated with the Sith cause might only warrant a token response at best. He might be a problem but it can wait until the separatist rebellion is quelled, the Jedi are an instrument to defend and uphold the republic first, defending the galaxy from evil a fairly distant second. The whole thing with Naboo said that much; even raising mention of Sith didn't really rouse anything out of them so Qui-Gon went back to Naboo alone to see what he could do now that his trip back to the council yielded no fruit. So yeah, fairly seriously, but also fairly unwilling to lend assistance. Pretty much most masters are already commited to the war as Generals by this point so they wouldn't be avalible to track down a rogue force user.
  13. In all fairness, being a "main big bad" isn't hugely important to the plot. Whomever is being an antagonist to appose the hero however is much more important. The Emperor isn't Luke's primary antagonist. Sure, he is the pure evil guy who ultimately holds immersable political clout but he exists as a faciliator for the conflict between Vader and Luke. Vader spends pretty much all three movies being Luke's antagonist and is regularly the primary force behind the story between those two characters. He started off as an immerse adversary that was the right hand man of Grand Moff Tarkin, then he personally lead the attack on Hoth in order to secure the young man with a motive that was mysterious right up until the final reveal. That started a conflict between the two that eventually ended with Vader being defeated. Once Vader was defeated and Luke was able to convince him that the hero he once was lay underneath that shell, he did the right thing and ended the Emperor's life decisively at the cost of his own life. While the Emperor was the Big Bad Evil Guy of the setting, his relationship with Luke wasn't very important but more of an environmental hazard that Skywalker had to overcome as the personification of true evil. Otherwise, he had very little role in the story at large until the final movie. No, the story of Luke was pretty much whether Vader could be redeemed, or Luke be turned rather then whether he was capable of defeating the Emperor. Likewise Kylo Ren was Rey's primary antagonist from the moment they met. His killing of her mentor/father figure in Han Solo and his desire to claim her, first to kill her, then corrupt her was pretty much pivotal to her character arc. He was an antagonistic force that constantly apposed her innocent belief in the Jedi and hated absolutely everything in the universe but her. Snoke didn't much care for her right until the point she was placed right before him and even then; the supreme leader only cared for her as far as it would affect Ben Solo. Same dynamic as Luke and the Emperor; he existed as a plot device to force the conflict between these two otherwise reluctant characters. Rey defeated him the first time to save her life, but this time she failed in her goal to redeem Kylo and stop this madness; instead he had fell further in killing Snoke and obtaining the power he wanted and only desired her to stand with him and watch the galaxy burn, together. Probably main success of Rise of Skywalker was playing this volatile relationship between these two characters; Kylo was both an irresistible force of temptation and was an adversary that constantly hounded her, and he almost succeeded too; Rey wasn't ever able to overcome or reason with him and required intervention to do so. What does all this mean? Just simply means the biggest guy in the room doesn't necessarily mean they are the main villain of the piece. The Emperor was an tiny old man because Vader was the adversary Luke had to overcome, not the Emperor. Likewise Snoke existed as a mechanism for Kylo to be forced into conflict with Rey, especially after his desire to kill her had abated. Snoke wasn't even an adversary of the resistance necessarily; to him they were like crushing ants and none of them had a personal connection to him, or even any attempt to assassinate or deal with him. He just existed as an environmental hazard for the heroes to navigate. Just because they are the BBEG, doesn't make them the main villain of the piece. The interesting thing about the Last Jedi was that it made Kylo Ren a main character on his own, anti-heroic journey with Snoke as his primary antagonist. They make very clear at the outset that Snoke very strongly desires to own this young man and has the raw power in both manpower and the force to bring his pet to heel, he only desires Kylo because he is an effective general and a powerful warrior that he could mould to challenge Luke Skywalker should he return. Kylo Ren resents this man but feels he needs his power to overcome the demon in his life, Luke Skywalker. Throughout the movie we see him grapple with his desire, discovers Rey whom both understands his pain and isolation and through that finds new strength to overcome the man whom is manipulating his entire destiny. He succeeded only to become everything Snoke represented; a powerful and deeply corruptedleader of the First Order filled with a burning desire to bring the galaxy to heel instead of choosing to be with Rey as Ben. Finn had Phasma. Sort of. Probably why he's such a meh character, after the first movie they couldn't find anything for him to do that couldn't be done better by any of the other characters on the main cast. Even his heroic act of self sacrifice was shallow because if Rey didn't beat the Emperor, it literally didn't mean anything since the resistance would've just failed anyway. He only did stuff because another character enabled him which is Kinda tragic now I think about it. Edit: Honestly? I feel Luke would've gone through a similar journey Annie (who was racing pods and blowing up capital ships even before any training) and Rey had the order of movies been reversed. Given with minimal training he blew up a Death Star and was able to move objects with his mind in times of great urgency, I assume most people with the force exhibit some super natural ability or, cooler yet, destiny actually rewrites reality to ensure they don't come to any harm. Pretty neat given that the force is literally destiny personaified into a handy catch all goodie bag of tropes. Given how regularly Lucas messed with his movies I wouldn't be too surprised if he had redone them, they would've been in a similar vein to the newer movies of the PT era.
  14. Yeah. But it's a year *after* the US release. Given how the internet works if people didn't pirate it first, they would've spoiled on everything that happened in that show long before we had opportunity to see it. That was the joke. Fair enough. Our tastes differ on that front and that's totally cool by me. In contrast, I had a lot of bits I liked in most movies; I found the Force Awakens a fun soft reboot, if lacking in substance. I found TLJ very surprising and capable of playing off more then just nostalga, which had basically been the big deal of the last two movies, but a bit convoluted in places. I found ROSW populated by fairly forgettable characters outside of the Reylo dynamic (which was reset) and a lacklustre blockbuster story that required more sweet popcorn to digest, but the lightsaber clashes and the force going being dialled up to 11 finally gives us a insight to what a epic level force and destiny campaign could look like which is something we've honestly lacked up until this point. Then again I've always been a bit weird like that; I find it very hard to hate anything especially strongly.
  15. I don't really believe that TLJ closed many doors. It set Kylo up as the supreme big bad whom wanted to break everything, a heroline with a connection to the big bad closing the door to him and the resistance and this particular wing of the new order badly damaged and has to find a way to persist from the ashes of the resistance. It's a pretty solid climax that established the status quo of this setting so that when the next one started up; we know the deal going into it. Kylo was especially dangerous as a villain because his only motivation is to destroy everything, republic, then probably even his new order. That's a terrifying motivation for a main villain to have. Just a pity that Kylo doesn't even get 3 minutes in the next movie to exercise that agency before he's immediately subjugated by a old BBEG. Compared to Force Awakens, that could've concluded at any point before, but had to have the hand held right the way to Rey and Luke's first meeting? It doesn't leave very much room to move either. You either have to immediately jump into that scene and run with what you got (and honestly, the Saber toss was one of the best moments of the movie, because it symbiosed three decades of hard work; wasted without a single line of dialogue. Beautiful.) or include a time skip with ton's of flashbacks. Basically, it obligated anyone who picked up the project to deal with this gigantic task of having to immediately push forward a new movie without any time to breathe. It's also worth noting that up to this point; no star wars movie has ever simply jumped from one cliff-hanger to another, but rather chose one climax to establish the Status quo (Peace on Naboo, the Clone Wars had begun, and the war is over, but the empire is alive. e.c.t) of the next. To argue that TLJ closed all the doors, while proclaiming the Force Awakens to do otherwise is rather unfair. That being said, I'm done here pretty much, just expressing my opinion on it all. One thing that *Really* grinds my gears though, is why the **** is Mandolorian being released one episode at a time in the UK? When the rest of the world has seen all of it? RAWRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR XD
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