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yeti1069

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  1. Like
    yeti1069 got a reaction from ESP77 in Let's make "spells"   
    For Necromancy, I was playing around with some ideas all day...
    Add it as Additional Effects to Conjuration.
    Require a talent that modifies how you use the base Conjuration, and then adds new Additional Effects. 
    Separate spell. 
     
    On the last, I was thinking something like the following:
    Necromancy: D: Works like the basic Conjuration + Summon Ally, except you may only raise a dead character or creature, and it is undead, either a skeleton or a zombie, GM's choice or caster's choice (or based on circumstances). Instead of spending 2 Strain to cast this spell, you must spend 2 Wounds.
    D: Additional Summon: Works same as for Conjuration, except you may spend 1 Wound or ^^ to summon another undead minion. 
    D: Medium Summon: Works the same as Conjuration. 
    D: Grand Summon: Works the same as Conjuration. 
    D: Bolster Undead: Undead you raise add damage to their attacks equal to your ranks in Knowledge, and improve their Crit rating by 1, to a minimum of 1. Affects one target of the spell. You may pay 1 Wound to affect an additional target up to the number of raised undead, or your Wound threshold. 
    DD: Drain Life: If you select this Additional Effect when casting Necromancy, you first suffer 2 strain, and make an attack against a living creature at Short or Engaged range. If the check is successful, it deals damage equal to your casting characteristic plus any uncancelled *. You may treat the damage dealt after soak as Wounds for the purpose of paying for the basic spell and any additional effects of the spell. For example, if you cast Necromancy with Additional Summon and Bolster Undead, and you successfully dealt 6 damage to a target, you could spend that 6 damage to pay for the 2 Wounds for the basic effect of the spell, 2 wounds to raise an additional 2 undead, and 2 wounds to affect all 3 with Bolster Undead without suffering any wounds yourself. 
  2. Like
    yeti1069 got a reaction from ESP77 in Let's make "spells"   
    After spending more time on it, I'm thinking shapechanging could just be a subset of Additional Effects added to Augment. 
     
    D: Alter Self: Change features of appearance, sex, race, grow or shrink a small amount (within same silhouette). May spend ^^ to mimic the appearance of someone else (upon examination, may substitute your casting skill for a Deception check to disguise your appearance). 
    D: Growth: May grow or shrink 1 Sil from your base Sil, to a minimum of 0. Shrinking adds B to your Stealth and Coordination checks. Growing adds a B to your Athletics and Resilience checks. If you achieve Sil 3 or higher, Brawl and Melee checks you perform increase their range to Short. May be used multiple times. 
    DD: Polymorph (Primal Only): Gain 1 of several benefits:
    Hands and feet turn into fins, and you grow gills. You may function normally underwater, and add B per * to your Athletics checks to swim.  Arms turn into wings, granting the ability to hover or fly, and add B per * to your Coordination checks to fly. Eyes grow large and avian, granting Darkvision (remove 2 SB from checks due to darkness), and add B per * to your Perception and Ranged attacks. Ears grow large, granting (something), and add B per * to your Vigilance checks.  Hands or feet grow clawed (this replaces Primal Fury, granting the same effects) <insert one or two other similar effects>  May spend ^^ to gain an additional transformation benefit, or gain the benefit without replacing your existing features (such as by growing wings from your back, rather than transforming your arms). 
     
    I would say Duration: Concentration, or adding a D: Extend duration for number of rounds equal to twice ranks in Knowledge would make sense here. 
     
    The list of effects you listed for Polymorph (and that I was tinkering with all day) just felt too much like they were stepping on the toes of Augment and Barrier, so it seemed to me like it would make more sense to just wrap them into Augment, especially since the base ability covers what most players would use such an ability for anyway: improving their rolls. 
  3. Like
    yeti1069 got a reaction from ZorinIchiona in Magic Weapons   
    My inclination is to stay away from trying to mimic '+x' weapons: +1 swords are boring. They were a necessary part of d20 systems, but I would much rather have interesting, unique items to give out.
     
    Genesys provides so many levers to tweak on a weapon to make it more interesting than simply +1 attack/damage. Increase base damage, reduce crit rating, add Vicious or Pierce, add some additional weapon qualities, a Boost die or two...or go into something more unusual like incorporating spells into the equipment.
     
    Dragonslayer
    Sword: Melee (light), damage +3, Crit 2, Defensive 1, Superior. When this sword is used to attack a dragon, it gains Pierce 5, Vicious 2, and Accurate 2.
    Mirror Shield
    Shield, etc.... If an opponent makes a magic attack against the wielder of this shield and generates 3 Threat, or 1 Despair on the check, after the check is resolved, the caster suffers a hit dealing damage equal to the total damage of the attack. (Just uses the Reflection additional effect from the Barrier spell). Maybe add some additional cost for the bearer of the shield...flip a story point, or spend a couple strain.
     
    I could definitely see adding some specific spell effects to weapons or armor (or other items) that are usable once per encounter, or once per session, and/or that require flipping a story point to activate.
    Or go completely "off the rails" and incorporate something totally unique. Dragonslayer could gain, "Earthbound 2: On a successful attack, you may spend a Triumph to cause the struck dragon to fall to the ground, and be unable to fly for 2 rounds."
     
  4. Like
    yeti1069 got a reaction from ESP77 in Genesys Talents Expanded   
    Love this resource, thank you!
  5. Like
    yeti1069 got a reaction from TheSapient in Genesys Talents Expanded   
    Love this resource, thank you!
  6. Thanks
    yeti1069 got a reaction from Rebelarch86 in The Big Issue with Canon (Minor Spoilers)   
    Compare:
    Episode IV: A NEW HOPE
    "It is a period of civil war. Rebel spaceships, striking from a hidden base, have won their first victory against the evil Galactic Empire. We are given an a brief explanation of the state of the galaxy.
    During the battle, Rebel spies managed to steal secret plans to the Empire's ultimate weapon, the DEATH STAR, an armored space station with enough power to destroy an entire planet.  This tells us what happened right before the movie begins, and...
    Pursued by the Empire's sinister agents, Princess Leia races home aboard her starship, custodian of the stolen plans that can save her people and restore freedom to the galaxy...." ...why the initial scene and characters are important.
    Episode V: THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK
    "It is a dark time for the Rebellion. Although the Death Star has been destroyed, Imperial troops have driven the Rebel forces from their hidden base and pursued them across the galaxy. Update on what has been going on between movies.
    Evading the dreaded Imperial Starfleet, a group of freedom fighters led by Luke Skywalker has established a new secret base on the remote ice world of Hoth.
    The evil lord Darth Vader, obsessed with finding young Skywalker, has dispatched thousands of remote probes into the far reaches of space...." The Empire is looking for the rebels, which leads us to the beginning of the film.
     
    To:
    Episode VII: THE FORCE AWAKENS
    "Luke Skywalker has vanished. In his absence, the sinister FIRST ORDER has risen from the ashes of the Empire and will not rest until Skywalker, the last Jedi, has been destroyed. This doesn't really tell us what the state of the galaxy is--just that some new enemy has arisen from the ashes of the old, and that, for some reason, Luke is missing. It also tells us he is the last Jedi, but not why, or why that's relevant, or why the First Order cares.
    With the support of the REPUBLIC, General Leia Organa leads a brave RESISTANCE. She is desperate to find her brother Luke and gain his help in restoring peace and justice to the galaxy. Who is the Republic? Presumably, it is the governing body formed after Return of the Jedi, but if it's a governing body, why does it need to support a resistance, rather than field an army? A "resistance" is "an underground organization composed of groups of private individuals working as an opposition force in a conquered country to overthrow the occupying power, usually by acts of sabotage, guerrilla warfare, etc..." Why is a General leading an underground group? How is the First Order an occupying power? This may seem irrelevant, but it doesn't make much sense on its own, and makes even less sense when viewed with the knowledge that the Rebels defeated The Empire in the last movie. And this crawl clearly assumes you've seen the previous films, because it requires you to know who Luke Skywalker is, and that he is important.
    Leia has sent her most daring pilot on a secret mission to Jakku, where an old ally has discovered a clue to Luke's whereabouts...." This whole crawl, while dallying with galactic politics, really feels like it is leading up to a movie that will be focused on Luke and Leia, and should deal with some interpersonal drama...then the movie just doesn't.
    Episode VIII: THE LAST JEDI
    "The FIRST ORDER reigns. Having decimated the peaceful Republic, Supreme Leader Snoke now deploys the merciless legions to seize military control of the galaxy. This happened, like, a day ago, right? Rey's first scene picks up just a few moments from where the last film ended. How much time has passed that they're mobilizing to seize control of the galaxy?
    Only General Leia Organa's band of RESISTANCE fighters stand against the rising tyranny, certain that Jedi Master Luke Skywalker will return and restore a spark of hope to the fight. Again, a rising tyranny isn't typically opposed by a resistance--the resistance comes after your territory has been taken over.
    But the Resistance has been exposed. As the First Order speeds toward the rebel base, the brave heroes mount a desperate escape...." This kind of skips the first part of Empire Strikes Back--the bad guys have already discovered the rebel base. Compare this all to the crawl for ESB: in that, there is mention of the rebels scoring a win in destroying the Death Star, but now are facing a counterattack by the Empire, whereas here, there's no mention of the rebels having scored any sort of victory.
    I suppose the core of the problem with the new movies is that they rush from one thing to the next. They breeze by whatever has happened in the galaxy over the last 20+ years, the First Order goes from being unknown (to the viewer) to being the dominant military force in the galaxy in the first couple of seconds of text, basically. The government reads like it's already written-off before the movie begins. Rey becomes an ace Jedi with even less training than Luke had in ANH. Characters jump back and forth across the galaxy in minutes, or hours, rather than hours or days. In the new films, there's hardly any down time, or character development, or exploration. We don't get longer, stiller, quieter shots, really--everything is action, or vapid dialogue, or more action.
  7. Like
    yeti1069 got a reaction from Ogrebear in The Big Issue with Canon (Minor Spoilers)   
    I tried reading one of the books--can't recall which right now--and it was absolutely unreadable. I got 10 pages in and have never opened it again. 
     
    The movies simply don't stand on their own: we're missing critical information to understand what is happening in the galaxy and why. So little of TFA and TLJ make sense. 
  8. Like
    yeti1069 got a reaction from siabrac in Spell acquisition   
    I was thinking over this some more today, and was feeling like charging XP for the augments may be too punitive, as that cost begins to really add up and pull away from advancing your character otherwise. What do you all think? 
     
    Another option could include allowing players to select a number of known augments equal to their casting characteristic. So, say someone had 3 Int and 2 Arcane, they could choose 2 spells to know, and 3 augments for each of those spells. 
    I just feel like I want some limiting factor on spell augmentation. 
    There's also the idea I've seen kicked about of crafting particular spells that players choose from, such as "Fireball," which would always include the augments for range, blast, and burn, but then I think we're skewing too much toward D&D, and I'd like to avoid that I think.
     
  9. Like
    yeti1069 got a reaction from Richardbuxton in Spell acquisition   
    I was thinking over this some more today, and was feeling like charging XP for the augments may be too punitive, as that cost begins to really add up and pull away from advancing your character otherwise. What do you all think? 
     
    Another option could include allowing players to select a number of known augments equal to their casting characteristic. So, say someone had 3 Int and 2 Arcane, they could choose 2 spells to know, and 3 augments for each of those spells. 
    I just feel like I want some limiting factor on spell augmentation. 
    There's also the idea I've seen kicked about of crafting particular spells that players choose from, such as "Fireball," which would always include the augments for range, blast, and burn, but then I think we're skewing too much toward D&D, and I'd like to avoid that I think.
     
  10. Like
    yeti1069 got a reaction from ZorinIchiona in Let's make "spells"   
    After spending more time on it, I'm thinking shapechanging could just be a subset of Additional Effects added to Augment. 
     
    D: Alter Self: Change features of appearance, sex, race, grow or shrink a small amount (within same silhouette). May spend ^^ to mimic the appearance of someone else (upon examination, may substitute your casting skill for a Deception check to disguise your appearance). 
    D: Growth: May grow or shrink 1 Sil from your base Sil, to a minimum of 0. Shrinking adds B to your Stealth and Coordination checks. Growing adds a B to your Athletics and Resilience checks. If you achieve Sil 3 or higher, Brawl and Melee checks you perform increase their range to Short. May be used multiple times. 
    DD: Polymorph (Primal Only): Gain 1 of several benefits:
    Hands and feet turn into fins, and you grow gills. You may function normally underwater, and add B per * to your Athletics checks to swim.  Arms turn into wings, granting the ability to hover or fly, and add B per * to your Coordination checks to fly. Eyes grow large and avian, granting Darkvision (remove 2 SB from checks due to darkness), and add B per * to your Perception and Ranged attacks. Ears grow large, granting (something), and add B per * to your Vigilance checks.  Hands or feet grow clawed (this replaces Primal Fury, granting the same effects) <insert one or two other similar effects>  May spend ^^ to gain an additional transformation benefit, or gain the benefit without replacing your existing features (such as by growing wings from your back, rather than transforming your arms). 
     
    I would say Duration: Concentration, or adding a D: Extend duration for number of rounds equal to twice ranks in Knowledge would make sense here. 
     
    The list of effects you listed for Polymorph (and that I was tinkering with all day) just felt too much like they were stepping on the toes of Augment and Barrier, so it seemed to me like it would make more sense to just wrap them into Augment, especially since the base ability covers what most players would use such an ability for anyway: improving their rolls. 
  11. Like
    yeti1069 got a reaction from kavaliro in Another Character Generator   
    Any plans to release a Genesys character generator?
  12. Like
    yeti1069 got a reaction from rsdockery in Spell acquisition   
    I definitely don't want to offer Attack for free. I would, however, give Utility for free at rank 1 in addition to whichever spell the player chooses. I know that, for me, I could definitely envision playing a caster who never takes or uses Attack, instead preferring to buff the party, debuff (curse) the enemies, or focus on crowd control in some other fashion. 
  13. Like
    yeti1069 got a reaction from O the Owl in Spell acquisition   
    I definitely don't want to offer Attack for free. I would, however, give Utility for free at rank 1 in addition to whichever spell the player chooses. I know that, for me, I could definitely envision playing a caster who never takes or uses Attack, instead preferring to buff the party, debuff (curse) the enemies, or focus on crowd control in some other fashion. 
  14. Like
    yeti1069 got a reaction from ZorinIchiona in Let's make "spells"   
    I would say that, rather than increase or decrease a characteristic, it would make more sense to just upgrade all checks made with one characteristic, and downgrade those made with another. It plays almost the same, but means you have to do less recalculating, and don't need to do any erasing. Ditto for the skill ranks. 
    This also needs some duration...is it concentration? Does it last a prescribed numbers of rounds/minutes? 
    Size increases by themselves don't do much in this system...I suppose it would occasionally be useful, but not anywhere near as much as, say, Enlarge Person is in D&D. Also, I should think it would make more sense for the base power to change you into something of the silhouette you are already, rather than defaulting to 0, though that doesn't play well with the size increasing augment. 
    Final thought is that the ability to fly is definitely not on par with the other listed abilities, and it seems like it should call for some additional cost, perhaps. Feature should probably also explain what the effect of mimicking a specific person is mechanically.
     
    One solution might be having a variable augment difficulty cost...1D for some abilities, 2D for some others? 
     
  15. Like
    yeti1069 got a reaction from Richardbuxton in Let's make "spells"   
    I would say that, rather than increase or decrease a characteristic, it would make more sense to just upgrade all checks made with one characteristic, and downgrade those made with another. It plays almost the same, but means you have to do less recalculating, and don't need to do any erasing. Ditto for the skill ranks. 
    This also needs some duration...is it concentration? Does it last a prescribed numbers of rounds/minutes? 
    Size increases by themselves don't do much in this system...I suppose it would occasionally be useful, but not anywhere near as much as, say, Enlarge Person is in D&D. Also, I should think it would make more sense for the base power to change you into something of the silhouette you are already, rather than defaulting to 0, though that doesn't play well with the size increasing augment. 
    Final thought is that the ability to fly is definitely not on par with the other listed abilities, and it seems like it should call for some additional cost, perhaps. Feature should probably also explain what the effect of mimicking a specific person is mechanically.
     
    One solution might be having a variable augment difficulty cost...1D for some abilities, 2D for some others? 
     
  16. Like
    yeti1069 got a reaction from whafrog in Multiple Successes or Failures   
    This is good advice. 
     
    As someone who has both GMed and played in the EotE system for a couple of years now...
    Use the provided charts for uses of advantage, threat, triumph and despair.  Look to the specific skill descriptions (or even the descriptions from EotE) for other uses for the above, as well as additional successes or failures You MUST get your players to join in with suggestions for what the results can mean.  Also, solicit them for when and why Boosts or Setbacks can be added to checks, and encourage them to suggest Setbacks even on their own checks by pointing out that many of the talents in the game improve your character by allowing you to remove Setbacks, and if you don't see many Setbacks on checks, those talents all become useless.  As your group plays in the system more, it will become easier to do all of the above, and easier to uses the additional results for more narrative effects.  One session isn't going to be enough to feel comfortable with all of that, but after a handful, it should start eating up both less time and less mental energy. Especially for non-structured encounters (non-combat) try to make time relevant. For many skills, additional success or failure translate to completing your task in more or less time, but this is only relevant if time matters. In Star Wars, I tried to embrace the feel of the films, where parties were splitting up somewhat regularly (an unthinkable thing in my D&D and Pathfinder games), and ensured that I was cutting back and forth fairly regularly (usually 1-2 minutes per character or group), to keep everyone engaged and build some tension. This way, you can have one character trying to disable a security system, while another is trying to talk their way out of a bad situation, and another is trying to blast their way into more trouble, as examples. Here, time can matter. Another way to make time matter is by telling the players that the task they want to accomplish will take, say, 15 minutes, but if they don't get it done in 12 there will be some negative consequence--that means they really need some additional successes to achieve the best result. 
  17. Like
    yeti1069 got a reaction from Rebelarch86 in The Big Issue with Canon (Minor Spoilers)   
    ****MAJOR SPOILERS*****
    ****MAJOR SPOILERS*****
    ****MAJOR SPOILERS*****
    ****MAJOR SPOILERS*****
     
     
    So, I checked my bookshelf...Aftermath is the book I was referring to, and is absolutely unreadable. I have, literally (pun intended) never attempted to read a book that is so poorly written that I could not get past page 10. The choppy, comic book scene-setting style is atrocious when used for more than a line or two here and there.
    You can't gate relevant information behind that garbage and then hold it up as proof that the new series has more substance or setting than can be found in the films alone.
     
    As for the argument that the political situation is relevant only to setting-conscious fans...that may be true, but here's the problem. Either the film is designed to build upon the earlier movies, or it's built to stand on its own. If it's the former, then it has to explain why we are essentially in the same situation as we found ourselves at the beginning of A New Hope despite 30 years passing, and all of the events through the end of Return of the Jedi having transpired, and if it's the latter, then we need to know more about the relationship between Han Solo and his son, and why Kylo Ren is the miserable bastard he is now, in order for the scene between the two of them to hold enough weight for the viewer. That scene is predicated on the existing nostalgia and love for Han Solo: we don't get enough information in the movie for it to have the gravity, the emotional impact, that it is clearly meant to have without assuming the viewer is carrying Star Wars baggage already. Similarly, the absence (or even just the notion) of Luke Skywalker requires the viewer to be familiar with the original trilogy, The Force Awakens does basically nothing to explain who this guy is, or why he's so **** important that these warring rival factions are expending so much time and energy looking for him.
     
    So, if we have to know who Luke is, and we have to have an existing love for Han (and Chewie--there are several jokes in the movie that work only if you are already familiar with these characters), and, to a lesser degree already revere Leia...then how do you deal with a movie whose entire premise says, "Yeah, I know the Rebellion essentially won their war against the psuedo-Nazi Empire at the end of the last movie thirty years ago, but this movie is going to revolve around a Rebellion fighting psuedo-Nazis who are almost entirely indistinguishable from the Empire with zero explanation as to why the only apparent change in the universe over 30 years is that it's actually rolled back 34 or 35 years, to before the Rebellion succeeded."
     
    That's my problem with TFA: we don't get enough information to make the things that are unique to the film at all relevant or impactful on their own, and we get no explanation as to why we're in the mess we find ourselves in.
     
    For TLJ, it just repeats huge chunks of The Empire Strikes Back, and fails to build on any of the stuff the first film failed to deliver. For the last year, every person I've brought up my issues with TFA with has said, "It's part of a trilogy, they had to save it for the next movie," and yet, the next movie does almost nothing to help the first. Sure, we get some explanation as to why Kylo and Luke had a falling out, but there's none that explains how or why Snoke got involved, or why Kylo was going dark in the first place, and, again, we are shown Kylo being torn between his rage and his remaining attachment to his mother, but in only the most tenuous fashion, but without any explanation as to what happened between him and his parents. Is his rage justified? Is it just a whiny brat rebelling against his parents in an especially homicidal fashion?
    TLJ doesn't give us much more for Rey's character, either--she's so one dimensional: she wants to find her parents, or her heritage, and she repeats the line that the galaxy needs Luke, as if she is no more than the recording of Leia beseeching Obi Wan so long ago. Eventually we're shown glimmers of her struggle to make sense of her powers, and find her place, but they're just that; glimpses. Then everyone else is flat, or pointless.
     
    Ultimately, probably the single biggest problem with both movies, even beyond the aforementioned issues, is that the films are a pile of action scenes stacked on top of each other, eschewing the pacing and development, and memorable dialogue from the original trilogy. There's so little interpersonal time spent in these films. Everyone is so separated, and every scene just leads into another overwrought action scene. And these weren't even that good. The prequel trilogy was fairly terrible, but at least I can be thoroughly satisfied watching a video compilation of all the lightsaber duels stitched together and set to Duel of the Fates, but none of the scenes in either of these movies really came up to even that level. The only scene I really liked in TLJ was when Luke projects himself to **** with Kylo, and even that they dropped the ball on--Luke embarrassed the little **** in front of all his men, but there's no moment where we see the impact of that, and Luke's jibe that he'll see Kylo around loses it's punch when he dissipates into the Force immediately after. So, all his angst and anguish over two movies comes down to, essentially, playing a practical joke on the bastard who betrayed him and murdered his best friend (by the way, Luke gets informed of this and then we don't even get to see his reaction! And he basically never touches back on this loss, or wound, again), and feels satisfied enough to become one with the Force.
     
    ******* awful.
  18. Like
    yeti1069 got a reaction from Ogrebear in The Big Issue with Canon (Minor Spoilers)   
    ****MAJOR SPOILERS*****
    ****MAJOR SPOILERS*****
    ****MAJOR SPOILERS*****
    ****MAJOR SPOILERS*****
     
     
    So, I checked my bookshelf...Aftermath is the book I was referring to, and is absolutely unreadable. I have, literally (pun intended) never attempted to read a book that is so poorly written that I could not get past page 10. The choppy, comic book scene-setting style is atrocious when used for more than a line or two here and there.
    You can't gate relevant information behind that garbage and then hold it up as proof that the new series has more substance or setting than can be found in the films alone.
     
    As for the argument that the political situation is relevant only to setting-conscious fans...that may be true, but here's the problem. Either the film is designed to build upon the earlier movies, or it's built to stand on its own. If it's the former, then it has to explain why we are essentially in the same situation as we found ourselves at the beginning of A New Hope despite 30 years passing, and all of the events through the end of Return of the Jedi having transpired, and if it's the latter, then we need to know more about the relationship between Han Solo and his son, and why Kylo Ren is the miserable bastard he is now, in order for the scene between the two of them to hold enough weight for the viewer. That scene is predicated on the existing nostalgia and love for Han Solo: we don't get enough information in the movie for it to have the gravity, the emotional impact, that it is clearly meant to have without assuming the viewer is carrying Star Wars baggage already. Similarly, the absence (or even just the notion) of Luke Skywalker requires the viewer to be familiar with the original trilogy, The Force Awakens does basically nothing to explain who this guy is, or why he's so **** important that these warring rival factions are expending so much time and energy looking for him.
     
    So, if we have to know who Luke is, and we have to have an existing love for Han (and Chewie--there are several jokes in the movie that work only if you are already familiar with these characters), and, to a lesser degree already revere Leia...then how do you deal with a movie whose entire premise says, "Yeah, I know the Rebellion essentially won their war against the psuedo-Nazi Empire at the end of the last movie thirty years ago, but this movie is going to revolve around a Rebellion fighting psuedo-Nazis who are almost entirely indistinguishable from the Empire with zero explanation as to why the only apparent change in the universe over 30 years is that it's actually rolled back 34 or 35 years, to before the Rebellion succeeded."
     
    That's my problem with TFA: we don't get enough information to make the things that are unique to the film at all relevant or impactful on their own, and we get no explanation as to why we're in the mess we find ourselves in.
     
    For TLJ, it just repeats huge chunks of The Empire Strikes Back, and fails to build on any of the stuff the first film failed to deliver. For the last year, every person I've brought up my issues with TFA with has said, "It's part of a trilogy, they had to save it for the next movie," and yet, the next movie does almost nothing to help the first. Sure, we get some explanation as to why Kylo and Luke had a falling out, but there's none that explains how or why Snoke got involved, or why Kylo was going dark in the first place, and, again, we are shown Kylo being torn between his rage and his remaining attachment to his mother, but in only the most tenuous fashion, but without any explanation as to what happened between him and his parents. Is his rage justified? Is it just a whiny brat rebelling against his parents in an especially homicidal fashion?
    TLJ doesn't give us much more for Rey's character, either--she's so one dimensional: she wants to find her parents, or her heritage, and she repeats the line that the galaxy needs Luke, as if she is no more than the recording of Leia beseeching Obi Wan so long ago. Eventually we're shown glimmers of her struggle to make sense of her powers, and find her place, but they're just that; glimpses. Then everyone else is flat, or pointless.
     
    Ultimately, probably the single biggest problem with both movies, even beyond the aforementioned issues, is that the films are a pile of action scenes stacked on top of each other, eschewing the pacing and development, and memorable dialogue from the original trilogy. There's so little interpersonal time spent in these films. Everyone is so separated, and every scene just leads into another overwrought action scene. And these weren't even that good. The prequel trilogy was fairly terrible, but at least I can be thoroughly satisfied watching a video compilation of all the lightsaber duels stitched together and set to Duel of the Fates, but none of the scenes in either of these movies really came up to even that level. The only scene I really liked in TLJ was when Luke projects himself to **** with Kylo, and even that they dropped the ball on--Luke embarrassed the little **** in front of all his men, but there's no moment where we see the impact of that, and Luke's jibe that he'll see Kylo around loses it's punch when he dissipates into the Force immediately after. So, all his angst and anguish over two movies comes down to, essentially, playing a practical joke on the bastard who betrayed him and murdered his best friend (by the way, Luke gets informed of this and then we don't even get to see his reaction! And he basically never touches back on this loss, or wound, again), and feels satisfied enough to become one with the Force.
     
    ******* awful.
  19. Like
    yeti1069 got a reaction from VigilancePress in Another Character Generator   
    Any plans to release a Genesys character generator?
  20. Like
    yeti1069 got a reaction from DurosSpacer in The Big Issue with Canon (Minor Spoilers)   
    I tried reading one of the books--can't recall which right now--and it was absolutely unreadable. I got 10 pages in and have never opened it again. 
     
    The movies simply don't stand on their own: we're missing critical information to understand what is happening in the galaxy and why. So little of TFA and TLJ make sense. 
  21. Like
    yeti1069 got a reaction from copperbell in The Big Issue with Canon (Minor Spoilers)   
    ****MAJOR SPOILERS*****
    ****MAJOR SPOILERS*****
    ****MAJOR SPOILERS*****
    ****MAJOR SPOILERS*****
     
     
    So, I checked my bookshelf...Aftermath is the book I was referring to, and is absolutely unreadable. I have, literally (pun intended) never attempted to read a book that is so poorly written that I could not get past page 10. The choppy, comic book scene-setting style is atrocious when used for more than a line or two here and there.
    You can't gate relevant information behind that garbage and then hold it up as proof that the new series has more substance or setting than can be found in the films alone.
     
    As for the argument that the political situation is relevant only to setting-conscious fans...that may be true, but here's the problem. Either the film is designed to build upon the earlier movies, or it's built to stand on its own. If it's the former, then it has to explain why we are essentially in the same situation as we found ourselves at the beginning of A New Hope despite 30 years passing, and all of the events through the end of Return of the Jedi having transpired, and if it's the latter, then we need to know more about the relationship between Han Solo and his son, and why Kylo Ren is the miserable bastard he is now, in order for the scene between the two of them to hold enough weight for the viewer. That scene is predicated on the existing nostalgia and love for Han Solo: we don't get enough information in the movie for it to have the gravity, the emotional impact, that it is clearly meant to have without assuming the viewer is carrying Star Wars baggage already. Similarly, the absence (or even just the notion) of Luke Skywalker requires the viewer to be familiar with the original trilogy, The Force Awakens does basically nothing to explain who this guy is, or why he's so **** important that these warring rival factions are expending so much time and energy looking for him.
     
    So, if we have to know who Luke is, and we have to have an existing love for Han (and Chewie--there are several jokes in the movie that work only if you are already familiar with these characters), and, to a lesser degree already revere Leia...then how do you deal with a movie whose entire premise says, "Yeah, I know the Rebellion essentially won their war against the psuedo-Nazi Empire at the end of the last movie thirty years ago, but this movie is going to revolve around a Rebellion fighting psuedo-Nazis who are almost entirely indistinguishable from the Empire with zero explanation as to why the only apparent change in the universe over 30 years is that it's actually rolled back 34 or 35 years, to before the Rebellion succeeded."
     
    That's my problem with TFA: we don't get enough information to make the things that are unique to the film at all relevant or impactful on their own, and we get no explanation as to why we're in the mess we find ourselves in.
     
    For TLJ, it just repeats huge chunks of The Empire Strikes Back, and fails to build on any of the stuff the first film failed to deliver. For the last year, every person I've brought up my issues with TFA with has said, "It's part of a trilogy, they had to save it for the next movie," and yet, the next movie does almost nothing to help the first. Sure, we get some explanation as to why Kylo and Luke had a falling out, but there's none that explains how or why Snoke got involved, or why Kylo was going dark in the first place, and, again, we are shown Kylo being torn between his rage and his remaining attachment to his mother, but in only the most tenuous fashion, but without any explanation as to what happened between him and his parents. Is his rage justified? Is it just a whiny brat rebelling against his parents in an especially homicidal fashion?
    TLJ doesn't give us much more for Rey's character, either--she's so one dimensional: she wants to find her parents, or her heritage, and she repeats the line that the galaxy needs Luke, as if she is no more than the recording of Leia beseeching Obi Wan so long ago. Eventually we're shown glimmers of her struggle to make sense of her powers, and find her place, but they're just that; glimpses. Then everyone else is flat, or pointless.
     
    Ultimately, probably the single biggest problem with both movies, even beyond the aforementioned issues, is that the films are a pile of action scenes stacked on top of each other, eschewing the pacing and development, and memorable dialogue from the original trilogy. There's so little interpersonal time spent in these films. Everyone is so separated, and every scene just leads into another overwrought action scene. And these weren't even that good. The prequel trilogy was fairly terrible, but at least I can be thoroughly satisfied watching a video compilation of all the lightsaber duels stitched together and set to Duel of the Fates, but none of the scenes in either of these movies really came up to even that level. The only scene I really liked in TLJ was when Luke projects himself to **** with Kylo, and even that they dropped the ball on--Luke embarrassed the little **** in front of all his men, but there's no moment where we see the impact of that, and Luke's jibe that he'll see Kylo around loses it's punch when he dissipates into the Force immediately after. So, all his angst and anguish over two movies comes down to, essentially, playing a practical joke on the bastard who betrayed him and murdered his best friend (by the way, Luke gets informed of this and then we don't even get to see his reaction! And he basically never touches back on this loss, or wound, again), and feels satisfied enough to become one with the Force.
     
    ******* awful.
  22. Like
    yeti1069 got a reaction from Yaccarus in The Big Issue with Canon (Minor Spoilers)   
    I tried reading one of the books--can't recall which right now--and it was absolutely unreadable. I got 10 pages in and have never opened it again. 
     
    The movies simply don't stand on their own: we're missing critical information to understand what is happening in the galaxy and why. So little of TFA and TLJ make sense. 
  23. Like
    yeti1069 got a reaction from GM Hooly in Another Character Generator   
    Any plans to release a Genesys character generator?
  24. Like
    yeti1069 got a reaction from Vestij Jai Galaar in The Big Issue with Canon (Minor Spoilers)   
    I tried reading one of the books--can't recall which right now--and it was absolutely unreadable. I got 10 pages in and have never opened it again. 
     
    The movies simply don't stand on their own: we're missing critical information to understand what is happening in the galaxy and why. So little of TFA and TLJ make sense. 
  25. Like
    yeti1069 got a reaction from Benjan Meruna in Can you trigger Sense's Duration Upgrade twice against the same attack?   
    That's what I figured. Just making sure. Thanks folks.
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