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yeti1069

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  1. Like
    yeti1069 got a reaction from Rebelarch86 in The Big Issue with Canon (Minor Spoilers)   
    ****MAJOR SPOILERS*****
    ****MAJOR SPOILERS*****
    ****MAJOR SPOILERS*****
    ****MAJOR SPOILERS*****
     
     
    So, I checked my bookshelf...Aftermath is the book I was referring to, and is absolutely unreadable. I have, literally (pun intended) never attempted to read a book that is so poorly written that I could not get past page 10. The choppy, comic book scene-setting style is atrocious when used for more than a line or two here and there.
    You can't gate relevant information behind that garbage and then hold it up as proof that the new series has more substance or setting than can be found in the films alone.
     
    As for the argument that the political situation is relevant only to setting-conscious fans...that may be true, but here's the problem. Either the film is designed to build upon the earlier movies, or it's built to stand on its own. If it's the former, then it has to explain why we are essentially in the same situation as we found ourselves at the beginning of A New Hope despite 30 years passing, and all of the events through the end of Return of the Jedi having transpired, and if it's the latter, then we need to know more about the relationship between Han Solo and his son, and why Kylo Ren is the miserable bastard he is now, in order for the scene between the two of them to hold enough weight for the viewer. That scene is predicated on the existing nostalgia and love for Han Solo: we don't get enough information in the movie for it to have the gravity, the emotional impact, that it is clearly meant to have without assuming the viewer is carrying Star Wars baggage already. Similarly, the absence (or even just the notion) of Luke Skywalker requires the viewer to be familiar with the original trilogy, The Force Awakens does basically nothing to explain who this guy is, or why he's so **** important that these warring rival factions are expending so much time and energy looking for him.
     
    So, if we have to know who Luke is, and we have to have an existing love for Han (and Chewie--there are several jokes in the movie that work only if you are already familiar with these characters), and, to a lesser degree already revere Leia...then how do you deal with a movie whose entire premise says, "Yeah, I know the Rebellion essentially won their war against the psuedo-Nazi Empire at the end of the last movie thirty years ago, but this movie is going to revolve around a Rebellion fighting psuedo-Nazis who are almost entirely indistinguishable from the Empire with zero explanation as to why the only apparent change in the universe over 30 years is that it's actually rolled back 34 or 35 years, to before the Rebellion succeeded."
     
    That's my problem with TFA: we don't get enough information to make the things that are unique to the film at all relevant or impactful on their own, and we get no explanation as to why we're in the mess we find ourselves in.
     
    For TLJ, it just repeats huge chunks of The Empire Strikes Back, and fails to build on any of the stuff the first film failed to deliver. For the last year, every person I've brought up my issues with TFA with has said, "It's part of a trilogy, they had to save it for the next movie," and yet, the next movie does almost nothing to help the first. Sure, we get some explanation as to why Kylo and Luke had a falling out, but there's none that explains how or why Snoke got involved, or why Kylo was going dark in the first place, and, again, we are shown Kylo being torn between his rage and his remaining attachment to his mother, but in only the most tenuous fashion, but without any explanation as to what happened between him and his parents. Is his rage justified? Is it just a whiny brat rebelling against his parents in an especially homicidal fashion?
    TLJ doesn't give us much more for Rey's character, either--she's so one dimensional: she wants to find her parents, or her heritage, and she repeats the line that the galaxy needs Luke, as if she is no more than the recording of Leia beseeching Obi Wan so long ago. Eventually we're shown glimmers of her struggle to make sense of her powers, and find her place, but they're just that; glimpses. Then everyone else is flat, or pointless.
     
    Ultimately, probably the single biggest problem with both movies, even beyond the aforementioned issues, is that the films are a pile of action scenes stacked on top of each other, eschewing the pacing and development, and memorable dialogue from the original trilogy. There's so little interpersonal time spent in these films. Everyone is so separated, and every scene just leads into another overwrought action scene. And these weren't even that good. The prequel trilogy was fairly terrible, but at least I can be thoroughly satisfied watching a video compilation of all the lightsaber duels stitched together and set to Duel of the Fates, but none of the scenes in either of these movies really came up to even that level. The only scene I really liked in TLJ was when Luke projects himself to **** with Kylo, and even that they dropped the ball on--Luke embarrassed the little **** in front of all his men, but there's no moment where we see the impact of that, and Luke's jibe that he'll see Kylo around loses it's punch when he dissipates into the Force immediately after. So, all his angst and anguish over two movies comes down to, essentially, playing a practical joke on the bastard who betrayed him and murdered his best friend (by the way, Luke gets informed of this and then we don't even get to see his reaction! And he basically never touches back on this loss, or wound, again), and feels satisfied enough to become one with the Force.
     
    ******* awful.
  2. Thanks
    yeti1069 got a reaction from Rebelarch86 in The Big Issue with Canon (Minor Spoilers)   
    Compare:
    Episode IV: A NEW HOPE
    "It is a period of civil war. Rebel spaceships, striking from a hidden base, have won their first victory against the evil Galactic Empire. We are given an a brief explanation of the state of the galaxy.
    During the battle, Rebel spies managed to steal secret plans to the Empire's ultimate weapon, the DEATH STAR, an armored space station with enough power to destroy an entire planet.  This tells us what happened right before the movie begins, and...
    Pursued by the Empire's sinister agents, Princess Leia races home aboard her starship, custodian of the stolen plans that can save her people and restore freedom to the galaxy...." ...why the initial scene and characters are important.
    Episode V: THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK
    "It is a dark time for the Rebellion. Although the Death Star has been destroyed, Imperial troops have driven the Rebel forces from their hidden base and pursued them across the galaxy. Update on what has been going on between movies.
    Evading the dreaded Imperial Starfleet, a group of freedom fighters led by Luke Skywalker has established a new secret base on the remote ice world of Hoth.
    The evil lord Darth Vader, obsessed with finding young Skywalker, has dispatched thousands of remote probes into the far reaches of space...." The Empire is looking for the rebels, which leads us to the beginning of the film.
     
    To:
    Episode VII: THE FORCE AWAKENS
    "Luke Skywalker has vanished. In his absence, the sinister FIRST ORDER has risen from the ashes of the Empire and will not rest until Skywalker, the last Jedi, has been destroyed. This doesn't really tell us what the state of the galaxy is--just that some new enemy has arisen from the ashes of the old, and that, for some reason, Luke is missing. It also tells us he is the last Jedi, but not why, or why that's relevant, or why the First Order cares.
    With the support of the REPUBLIC, General Leia Organa leads a brave RESISTANCE. She is desperate to find her brother Luke and gain his help in restoring peace and justice to the galaxy. Who is the Republic? Presumably, it is the governing body formed after Return of the Jedi, but if it's a governing body, why does it need to support a resistance, rather than field an army? A "resistance" is "an underground organization composed of groups of private individuals working as an opposition force in a conquered country to overthrow the occupying power, usually by acts of sabotage, guerrilla warfare, etc..." Why is a General leading an underground group? How is the First Order an occupying power? This may seem irrelevant, but it doesn't make much sense on its own, and makes even less sense when viewed with the knowledge that the Rebels defeated The Empire in the last movie. And this crawl clearly assumes you've seen the previous films, because it requires you to know who Luke Skywalker is, and that he is important.
    Leia has sent her most daring pilot on a secret mission to Jakku, where an old ally has discovered a clue to Luke's whereabouts...." This whole crawl, while dallying with galactic politics, really feels like it is leading up to a movie that will be focused on Luke and Leia, and should deal with some interpersonal drama...then the movie just doesn't.
    Episode VIII: THE LAST JEDI
    "The FIRST ORDER reigns. Having decimated the peaceful Republic, Supreme Leader Snoke now deploys the merciless legions to seize military control of the galaxy. This happened, like, a day ago, right? Rey's first scene picks up just a few moments from where the last film ended. How much time has passed that they're mobilizing to seize control of the galaxy?
    Only General Leia Organa's band of RESISTANCE fighters stand against the rising tyranny, certain that Jedi Master Luke Skywalker will return and restore a spark of hope to the fight. Again, a rising tyranny isn't typically opposed by a resistance--the resistance comes after your territory has been taken over.
    But the Resistance has been exposed. As the First Order speeds toward the rebel base, the brave heroes mount a desperate escape...." This kind of skips the first part of Empire Strikes Back--the bad guys have already discovered the rebel base. Compare this all to the crawl for ESB: in that, there is mention of the rebels scoring a win in destroying the Death Star, but now are facing a counterattack by the Empire, whereas here, there's no mention of the rebels having scored any sort of victory.
    I suppose the core of the problem with the new movies is that they rush from one thing to the next. They breeze by whatever has happened in the galaxy over the last 20+ years, the First Order goes from being unknown (to the viewer) to being the dominant military force in the galaxy in the first couple of seconds of text, basically. The government reads like it's already written-off before the movie begins. Rey becomes an ace Jedi with even less training than Luke had in ANH. Characters jump back and forth across the galaxy in minutes, or hours, rather than hours or days. In the new films, there's hardly any down time, or character development, or exploration. We don't get longer, stiller, quieter shots, really--everything is action, or vapid dialogue, or more action.
  3. Like
    yeti1069 got a reaction from Ogrebear in The Big Issue with Canon (Minor Spoilers)   
    ****MAJOR SPOILERS*****
    ****MAJOR SPOILERS*****
    ****MAJOR SPOILERS*****
    ****MAJOR SPOILERS*****
     
     
    So, I checked my bookshelf...Aftermath is the book I was referring to, and is absolutely unreadable. I have, literally (pun intended) never attempted to read a book that is so poorly written that I could not get past page 10. The choppy, comic book scene-setting style is atrocious when used for more than a line or two here and there.
    You can't gate relevant information behind that garbage and then hold it up as proof that the new series has more substance or setting than can be found in the films alone.
     
    As for the argument that the political situation is relevant only to setting-conscious fans...that may be true, but here's the problem. Either the film is designed to build upon the earlier movies, or it's built to stand on its own. If it's the former, then it has to explain why we are essentially in the same situation as we found ourselves at the beginning of A New Hope despite 30 years passing, and all of the events through the end of Return of the Jedi having transpired, and if it's the latter, then we need to know more about the relationship between Han Solo and his son, and why Kylo Ren is the miserable bastard he is now, in order for the scene between the two of them to hold enough weight for the viewer. That scene is predicated on the existing nostalgia and love for Han Solo: we don't get enough information in the movie for it to have the gravity, the emotional impact, that it is clearly meant to have without assuming the viewer is carrying Star Wars baggage already. Similarly, the absence (or even just the notion) of Luke Skywalker requires the viewer to be familiar with the original trilogy, The Force Awakens does basically nothing to explain who this guy is, or why he's so **** important that these warring rival factions are expending so much time and energy looking for him.
     
    So, if we have to know who Luke is, and we have to have an existing love for Han (and Chewie--there are several jokes in the movie that work only if you are already familiar with these characters), and, to a lesser degree already revere Leia...then how do you deal with a movie whose entire premise says, "Yeah, I know the Rebellion essentially won their war against the psuedo-Nazi Empire at the end of the last movie thirty years ago, but this movie is going to revolve around a Rebellion fighting psuedo-Nazis who are almost entirely indistinguishable from the Empire with zero explanation as to why the only apparent change in the universe over 30 years is that it's actually rolled back 34 or 35 years, to before the Rebellion succeeded."
     
    That's my problem with TFA: we don't get enough information to make the things that are unique to the film at all relevant or impactful on their own, and we get no explanation as to why we're in the mess we find ourselves in.
     
    For TLJ, it just repeats huge chunks of The Empire Strikes Back, and fails to build on any of the stuff the first film failed to deliver. For the last year, every person I've brought up my issues with TFA with has said, "It's part of a trilogy, they had to save it for the next movie," and yet, the next movie does almost nothing to help the first. Sure, we get some explanation as to why Kylo and Luke had a falling out, but there's none that explains how or why Snoke got involved, or why Kylo was going dark in the first place, and, again, we are shown Kylo being torn between his rage and his remaining attachment to his mother, but in only the most tenuous fashion, but without any explanation as to what happened between him and his parents. Is his rage justified? Is it just a whiny brat rebelling against his parents in an especially homicidal fashion?
    TLJ doesn't give us much more for Rey's character, either--she's so one dimensional: she wants to find her parents, or her heritage, and she repeats the line that the galaxy needs Luke, as if she is no more than the recording of Leia beseeching Obi Wan so long ago. Eventually we're shown glimmers of her struggle to make sense of her powers, and find her place, but they're just that; glimpses. Then everyone else is flat, or pointless.
     
    Ultimately, probably the single biggest problem with both movies, even beyond the aforementioned issues, is that the films are a pile of action scenes stacked on top of each other, eschewing the pacing and development, and memorable dialogue from the original trilogy. There's so little interpersonal time spent in these films. Everyone is so separated, and every scene just leads into another overwrought action scene. And these weren't even that good. The prequel trilogy was fairly terrible, but at least I can be thoroughly satisfied watching a video compilation of all the lightsaber duels stitched together and set to Duel of the Fates, but none of the scenes in either of these movies really came up to even that level. The only scene I really liked in TLJ was when Luke projects himself to **** with Kylo, and even that they dropped the ball on--Luke embarrassed the little **** in front of all his men, but there's no moment where we see the impact of that, and Luke's jibe that he'll see Kylo around loses it's punch when he dissipates into the Force immediately after. So, all his angst and anguish over two movies comes down to, essentially, playing a practical joke on the bastard who betrayed him and murdered his best friend (by the way, Luke gets informed of this and then we don't even get to see his reaction! And he basically never touches back on this loss, or wound, again), and feels satisfied enough to become one with the Force.
     
    ******* awful.
  4. Like
    yeti1069 got a reaction from Ogrebear in The Big Issue with Canon (Minor Spoilers)   
    I tried reading one of the books--can't recall which right now--and it was absolutely unreadable. I got 10 pages in and have never opened it again. 
     
    The movies simply don't stand on their own: we're missing critical information to understand what is happening in the galaxy and why. So little of TFA and TLJ make sense. 
  5. Like
    yeti1069 got a reaction from atruefool in The Big Issue with Canon (Minor Spoilers)   
    Compare:
    Episode IV: A NEW HOPE
    "It is a period of civil war. Rebel spaceships, striking from a hidden base, have won their first victory against the evil Galactic Empire. We are given an a brief explanation of the state of the galaxy.
    During the battle, Rebel spies managed to steal secret plans to the Empire's ultimate weapon, the DEATH STAR, an armored space station with enough power to destroy an entire planet.  This tells us what happened right before the movie begins, and...
    Pursued by the Empire's sinister agents, Princess Leia races home aboard her starship, custodian of the stolen plans that can save her people and restore freedom to the galaxy...." ...why the initial scene and characters are important.
    Episode V: THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK
    "It is a dark time for the Rebellion. Although the Death Star has been destroyed, Imperial troops have driven the Rebel forces from their hidden base and pursued them across the galaxy. Update on what has been going on between movies.
    Evading the dreaded Imperial Starfleet, a group of freedom fighters led by Luke Skywalker has established a new secret base on the remote ice world of Hoth.
    The evil lord Darth Vader, obsessed with finding young Skywalker, has dispatched thousands of remote probes into the far reaches of space...." The Empire is looking for the rebels, which leads us to the beginning of the film.
     
    To:
    Episode VII: THE FORCE AWAKENS
    "Luke Skywalker has vanished. In his absence, the sinister FIRST ORDER has risen from the ashes of the Empire and will not rest until Skywalker, the last Jedi, has been destroyed. This doesn't really tell us what the state of the galaxy is--just that some new enemy has arisen from the ashes of the old, and that, for some reason, Luke is missing. It also tells us he is the last Jedi, but not why, or why that's relevant, or why the First Order cares.
    With the support of the REPUBLIC, General Leia Organa leads a brave RESISTANCE. She is desperate to find her brother Luke and gain his help in restoring peace and justice to the galaxy. Who is the Republic? Presumably, it is the governing body formed after Return of the Jedi, but if it's a governing body, why does it need to support a resistance, rather than field an army? A "resistance" is "an underground organization composed of groups of private individuals working as an opposition force in a conquered country to overthrow the occupying power, usually by acts of sabotage, guerrilla warfare, etc..." Why is a General leading an underground group? How is the First Order an occupying power? This may seem irrelevant, but it doesn't make much sense on its own, and makes even less sense when viewed with the knowledge that the Rebels defeated The Empire in the last movie. And this crawl clearly assumes you've seen the previous films, because it requires you to know who Luke Skywalker is, and that he is important.
    Leia has sent her most daring pilot on a secret mission to Jakku, where an old ally has discovered a clue to Luke's whereabouts...." This whole crawl, while dallying with galactic politics, really feels like it is leading up to a movie that will be focused on Luke and Leia, and should deal with some interpersonal drama...then the movie just doesn't.
    Episode VIII: THE LAST JEDI
    "The FIRST ORDER reigns. Having decimated the peaceful Republic, Supreme Leader Snoke now deploys the merciless legions to seize military control of the galaxy. This happened, like, a day ago, right? Rey's first scene picks up just a few moments from where the last film ended. How much time has passed that they're mobilizing to seize control of the galaxy?
    Only General Leia Organa's band of RESISTANCE fighters stand against the rising tyranny, certain that Jedi Master Luke Skywalker will return and restore a spark of hope to the fight. Again, a rising tyranny isn't typically opposed by a resistance--the resistance comes after your territory has been taken over.
    But the Resistance has been exposed. As the First Order speeds toward the rebel base, the brave heroes mount a desperate escape...." This kind of skips the first part of Empire Strikes Back--the bad guys have already discovered the rebel base. Compare this all to the crawl for ESB: in that, there is mention of the rebels scoring a win in destroying the Death Star, but now are facing a counterattack by the Empire, whereas here, there's no mention of the rebels having scored any sort of victory.
    I suppose the core of the problem with the new movies is that they rush from one thing to the next. They breeze by whatever has happened in the galaxy over the last 20+ years, the First Order goes from being unknown (to the viewer) to being the dominant military force in the galaxy in the first couple of seconds of text, basically. The government reads like it's already written-off before the movie begins. Rey becomes an ace Jedi with even less training than Luke had in ANH. Characters jump back and forth across the galaxy in minutes, or hours, rather than hours or days. In the new films, there's hardly any down time, or character development, or exploration. We don't get longer, stiller, quieter shots, really--everything is action, or vapid dialogue, or more action.
  6. Like
    yeti1069 got a reaction from DurosSpacer in The Big Issue with Canon (Minor Spoilers)   
    I tried reading one of the books--can't recall which right now--and it was absolutely unreadable. I got 10 pages in and have never opened it again. 
     
    The movies simply don't stand on their own: we're missing critical information to understand what is happening in the galaxy and why. So little of TFA and TLJ make sense. 
  7. Like
    yeti1069 got a reaction from siabrac in Zombies   
    You pool their wounds, yeah.
    If you want 16 zombies in the encounter, you could roll two ability dice 16 times, probably missing most of those, probably scoring 0 critical hits, and probably triggering 0 extra effects. Players have to devote their attacks against single zombies, almost certainly killing them one at a time on each swing--criticals and most weapon qualities are wasted. They become a time sink, and little more.
    Or, you make 4 minion groups of 4 zombies, rolling two ability dice and two proficiency dice 4 times, probably hitting fairly often, scoring a few criticals, and probably activating extra effects (such as Knockdown) with some frequency. Players attack a group, and can use criticals to kill off minions. The overall combat takes much less time, but is more threatening, more exciting.
    We have two options in this thread for capturing the feel of those hard to kill zombies:
    -Exceeding wound threshold doesn't kill them, only a critical hit does. Now the minions are more resilient, more of a threat for longer, with more time to get in their own critical hits, or Knockdown players.
    -Minions go down as normal, but every time a player generates 3 threat or a despair, one or more minions come back.
  8. Like
    yeti1069 got a reaction from Richardbuxton in Genesys Talents Expanded   
    Getting what may amount to a free 3rd maneuver is pretty big. Maybe you have enough maneuvers to get to just Short range, then your turn would normally be over, but in this case, you get to make that attack anyway.
    If you have other important maneuvers you could use those.
  9. Like
    yeti1069 got a reaction from Ogrebear in The Big Issue with Canon (Minor Spoilers)   
    We don't know who Snoke is, where he's from, how he (founded?) this new organization, why he cares about Luke, or how he got his grips on Ben Solo.
    Tarkin is supposed to be a cog near the top of an evil empire, and fills that role. He isn't the leader, or founder, and doesn't express desires that leave one feeling puzzled. He's an arm of the evil government, analogous in some ways to Nazi Germany, is ruthless, and known to the hero (Leia clearly knows enough about him to recognize and despise him at their first meeting), and they have some back-and-forth dialogue.
    The Emperor is explained as having seized control of the government by dissolving the Senate (how, we don't know, but we know he did it, and is now in power of the already-established government--he committed a coop). He becomes impressive, because he cows Darth Vader, who was the most powerful, most evil, character in the films, which lends the Emperor some credence ("Who is this guy that commands DV?!"), and he's mysterious. When we finally meet him, he remains somewhat mysterious, cowled and seated as he is, but reveals to us some of what we need to know: he is also a Force user, Darth Vader, mega-badass, is his apprentice.
    Snoke is mentioned a bit, but no one really talks about where he's from, how he came to power, how this organization of his has risen so swiftly, etc... No one really seems to fear him, or speak as though his wrath or presence is momentous, and his lapdog throws temper-tantrums. Kylo is faaar less impressive than Vader. So, Snoke gets less cred through association than the Emperor does, and is mysterious in all the wrong ways, because the answers to the questions about him and the FO are kind of central to what the **** is going on in the two movies.
  10. Like
    yeti1069 got a reaction from Ogrebear in The Big Issue with Canon (Minor Spoilers)   
    Compare:
    Episode IV: A NEW HOPE
    "It is a period of civil war. Rebel spaceships, striking from a hidden base, have won their first victory against the evil Galactic Empire. We are given an a brief explanation of the state of the galaxy.
    During the battle, Rebel spies managed to steal secret plans to the Empire's ultimate weapon, the DEATH STAR, an armored space station with enough power to destroy an entire planet.  This tells us what happened right before the movie begins, and...
    Pursued by the Empire's sinister agents, Princess Leia races home aboard her starship, custodian of the stolen plans that can save her people and restore freedom to the galaxy...." ...why the initial scene and characters are important.
    Episode V: THE EMPIRE STRIKES BACK
    "It is a dark time for the Rebellion. Although the Death Star has been destroyed, Imperial troops have driven the Rebel forces from their hidden base and pursued them across the galaxy. Update on what has been going on between movies.
    Evading the dreaded Imperial Starfleet, a group of freedom fighters led by Luke Skywalker has established a new secret base on the remote ice world of Hoth.
    The evil lord Darth Vader, obsessed with finding young Skywalker, has dispatched thousands of remote probes into the far reaches of space...." The Empire is looking for the rebels, which leads us to the beginning of the film.
     
    To:
    Episode VII: THE FORCE AWAKENS
    "Luke Skywalker has vanished. In his absence, the sinister FIRST ORDER has risen from the ashes of the Empire and will not rest until Skywalker, the last Jedi, has been destroyed. This doesn't really tell us what the state of the galaxy is--just that some new enemy has arisen from the ashes of the old, and that, for some reason, Luke is missing. It also tells us he is the last Jedi, but not why, or why that's relevant, or why the First Order cares.
    With the support of the REPUBLIC, General Leia Organa leads a brave RESISTANCE. She is desperate to find her brother Luke and gain his help in restoring peace and justice to the galaxy. Who is the Republic? Presumably, it is the governing body formed after Return of the Jedi, but if it's a governing body, why does it need to support a resistance, rather than field an army? A "resistance" is "an underground organization composed of groups of private individuals working as an opposition force in a conquered country to overthrow the occupying power, usually by acts of sabotage, guerrilla warfare, etc..." Why is a General leading an underground group? How is the First Order an occupying power? This may seem irrelevant, but it doesn't make much sense on its own, and makes even less sense when viewed with the knowledge that the Rebels defeated The Empire in the last movie. And this crawl clearly assumes you've seen the previous films, because it requires you to know who Luke Skywalker is, and that he is important.
    Leia has sent her most daring pilot on a secret mission to Jakku, where an old ally has discovered a clue to Luke's whereabouts...." This whole crawl, while dallying with galactic politics, really feels like it is leading up to a movie that will be focused on Luke and Leia, and should deal with some interpersonal drama...then the movie just doesn't.
    Episode VIII: THE LAST JEDI
    "The FIRST ORDER reigns. Having decimated the peaceful Republic, Supreme Leader Snoke now deploys the merciless legions to seize military control of the galaxy. This happened, like, a day ago, right? Rey's first scene picks up just a few moments from where the last film ended. How much time has passed that they're mobilizing to seize control of the galaxy?
    Only General Leia Organa's band of RESISTANCE fighters stand against the rising tyranny, certain that Jedi Master Luke Skywalker will return and restore a spark of hope to the fight. Again, a rising tyranny isn't typically opposed by a resistance--the resistance comes after your territory has been taken over.
    But the Resistance has been exposed. As the First Order speeds toward the rebel base, the brave heroes mount a desperate escape...." This kind of skips the first part of Empire Strikes Back--the bad guys have already discovered the rebel base. Compare this all to the crawl for ESB: in that, there is mention of the rebels scoring a win in destroying the Death Star, but now are facing a counterattack by the Empire, whereas here, there's no mention of the rebels having scored any sort of victory.
    I suppose the core of the problem with the new movies is that they rush from one thing to the next. They breeze by whatever has happened in the galaxy over the last 20+ years, the First Order goes from being unknown (to the viewer) to being the dominant military force in the galaxy in the first couple of seconds of text, basically. The government reads like it's already written-off before the movie begins. Rey becomes an ace Jedi with even less training than Luke had in ANH. Characters jump back and forth across the galaxy in minutes, or hours, rather than hours or days. In the new films, there's hardly any down time, or character development, or exploration. We don't get longer, stiller, quieter shots, really--everything is action, or vapid dialogue, or more action.
  11. Like
    yeti1069 got a reaction from copperbell in The Big Issue with Canon (Minor Spoilers)   
    ****MAJOR SPOILERS*****
    ****MAJOR SPOILERS*****
    ****MAJOR SPOILERS*****
    ****MAJOR SPOILERS*****
     
     
    So, I checked my bookshelf...Aftermath is the book I was referring to, and is absolutely unreadable. I have, literally (pun intended) never attempted to read a book that is so poorly written that I could not get past page 10. The choppy, comic book scene-setting style is atrocious when used for more than a line or two here and there.
    You can't gate relevant information behind that garbage and then hold it up as proof that the new series has more substance or setting than can be found in the films alone.
     
    As for the argument that the political situation is relevant only to setting-conscious fans...that may be true, but here's the problem. Either the film is designed to build upon the earlier movies, or it's built to stand on its own. If it's the former, then it has to explain why we are essentially in the same situation as we found ourselves at the beginning of A New Hope despite 30 years passing, and all of the events through the end of Return of the Jedi having transpired, and if it's the latter, then we need to know more about the relationship between Han Solo and his son, and why Kylo Ren is the miserable bastard he is now, in order for the scene between the two of them to hold enough weight for the viewer. That scene is predicated on the existing nostalgia and love for Han Solo: we don't get enough information in the movie for it to have the gravity, the emotional impact, that it is clearly meant to have without assuming the viewer is carrying Star Wars baggage already. Similarly, the absence (or even just the notion) of Luke Skywalker requires the viewer to be familiar with the original trilogy, The Force Awakens does basically nothing to explain who this guy is, or why he's so **** important that these warring rival factions are expending so much time and energy looking for him.
     
    So, if we have to know who Luke is, and we have to have an existing love for Han (and Chewie--there are several jokes in the movie that work only if you are already familiar with these characters), and, to a lesser degree already revere Leia...then how do you deal with a movie whose entire premise says, "Yeah, I know the Rebellion essentially won their war against the psuedo-Nazi Empire at the end of the last movie thirty years ago, but this movie is going to revolve around a Rebellion fighting psuedo-Nazis who are almost entirely indistinguishable from the Empire with zero explanation as to why the only apparent change in the universe over 30 years is that it's actually rolled back 34 or 35 years, to before the Rebellion succeeded."
     
    That's my problem with TFA: we don't get enough information to make the things that are unique to the film at all relevant or impactful on their own, and we get no explanation as to why we're in the mess we find ourselves in.
     
    For TLJ, it just repeats huge chunks of The Empire Strikes Back, and fails to build on any of the stuff the first film failed to deliver. For the last year, every person I've brought up my issues with TFA with has said, "It's part of a trilogy, they had to save it for the next movie," and yet, the next movie does almost nothing to help the first. Sure, we get some explanation as to why Kylo and Luke had a falling out, but there's none that explains how or why Snoke got involved, or why Kylo was going dark in the first place, and, again, we are shown Kylo being torn between his rage and his remaining attachment to his mother, but in only the most tenuous fashion, but without any explanation as to what happened between him and his parents. Is his rage justified? Is it just a whiny brat rebelling against his parents in an especially homicidal fashion?
    TLJ doesn't give us much more for Rey's character, either--she's so one dimensional: she wants to find her parents, or her heritage, and she repeats the line that the galaxy needs Luke, as if she is no more than the recording of Leia beseeching Obi Wan so long ago. Eventually we're shown glimmers of her struggle to make sense of her powers, and find her place, but they're just that; glimpses. Then everyone else is flat, or pointless.
     
    Ultimately, probably the single biggest problem with both movies, even beyond the aforementioned issues, is that the films are a pile of action scenes stacked on top of each other, eschewing the pacing and development, and memorable dialogue from the original trilogy. There's so little interpersonal time spent in these films. Everyone is so separated, and every scene just leads into another overwrought action scene. And these weren't even that good. The prequel trilogy was fairly terrible, but at least I can be thoroughly satisfied watching a video compilation of all the lightsaber duels stitched together and set to Duel of the Fates, but none of the scenes in either of these movies really came up to even that level. The only scene I really liked in TLJ was when Luke projects himself to **** with Kylo, and even that they dropped the ball on--Luke embarrassed the little **** in front of all his men, but there's no moment where we see the impact of that, and Luke's jibe that he'll see Kylo around loses it's punch when he dissipates into the Force immediately after. So, all his angst and anguish over two movies comes down to, essentially, playing a practical joke on the bastard who betrayed him and murdered his best friend (by the way, Luke gets informed of this and then we don't even get to see his reaction! And he basically never touches back on this loss, or wound, again), and feels satisfied enough to become one with the Force.
     
    ******* awful.
  12. Like
    yeti1069 got a reaction from RagingJim in Zombies   
    Zombie (Minion)
    Brawn 2, Agility 2, Intellect 1, Cunning 2, Willpower 1, Presence 1
    Wound Threshold 4, Soak 3, Defense 0 | 0
    Skills: Brawl, Vigilance, Athletics
    Abilities: Implacable: Exceeding a zombie's wound threshold has no effect: they do not become incapacitated or die, and they do not suffer a critical injury. The only way to kill a zombie is to score a critical hit.
    Clawing hands (Brawl; Damage 3; Critical 4; Range [Engaged]; Ensnare 1)
    Raised Soak by 1, rather than add Defense, but I'm not sure which I would prefer. Obviously, soak isn't going to be super-meaningful, although there is the possibility of someone scoring a hit, with a critical, but not dealing enough damage to bypass soak (seriously doubtful). Defense would make them more resilient, but where are they getting defense from?
  13. Like
    yeti1069 got a reaction from ESP77 in Genesys Talents Expanded   
    Maybe one builds on Finesse line as an Agility combat check, and the other is open?
    Finesse (Supreme)
    Tier 5
    Activation: Active (maneuver)
    Spend 2 strain and a maneuver to grant your next Melee (light) or Brawl combat check this turn the Linked 2 quality.
    Furious Assault
    Tier 5
    Activation: Active (maneuver)
    Spend 3 strain and a maneuver to grant your next Melee or Brawl combat check this turn the Auto-fire quality. Increase the difficulty of that attack as normal.
     
    The first requires two other talents, and is restricted in how it's used, whereas the second is more open, but calls for a harder difficulty as well.
  14. Like
    yeti1069 reacted to ESP77 in Zombies   
    Genesys product tab. Player resources.
    https://images-cdn.fantasyflightgames.com/filer_public/56/75/5675bba2-a5a2-4161-b4c0-eaed85a3d0b7/genesys_gencon_adventure_lowres.pdf
  15. Like
    yeti1069 got a reaction from Richardbuxton in Genesys Talents Expanded   
    Maybe one builds on Finesse line as an Agility combat check, and the other is open?
    Finesse (Supreme)
    Tier 5
    Activation: Active (maneuver)
    Spend 2 strain and a maneuver to grant your next Melee (light) or Brawl combat check this turn the Linked 2 quality.
    Furious Assault
    Tier 5
    Activation: Active (maneuver)
    Spend 3 strain and a maneuver to grant your next Melee or Brawl combat check this turn the Auto-fire quality. Increase the difficulty of that attack as normal.
     
    The first requires two other talents, and is restricted in how it's used, whereas the second is more open, but calls for a harder difficulty as well.
  16. Like
    yeti1069 reacted to TheSapient in Genesys Talents Expanded   
    We never rest...
    VERSION 2.5 is now available.
    brought to you by TheSapient, ESP77, Swordbreaker, and Richardbuxton.
    With several small content fixes, hyperlinked bookmarks and table of content, and a new look.
    Version 2.5 (PDF) is Here
    To make small changes for your campaign, you will want THIS WORD FILE.
    You need it in spreadsheet form?  HERE IT IS IN EXCEL.
    You will need to download and install these TTF Genesys Fonts, which were posted HERE.  
    Changelog from Version 1.0 is HERE.
    We are happy to welcome yeti1069 the team!
  17. Like
    yeti1069 reacted to Richardbuxton in Zombies   
    “A zombie does not become incapacitated when it suffers wounds in excess of its Wound Threshold, although the Zombie still suffers the associated Critical injurie. Any successful hit on a Zombie that has exceeded its wound threshold automatically inflicts a critical injury.
  18. Like
    yeti1069 got a reaction from Richardbuxton in Zombies   
    New template:
    Zombify
    Reduce Intellect, Willpower, and Presence to 1.
    Reduce Agility or Cunning by 1.
    If applied to a rival, it gains Undead Vigor and Ponderous, and its unarmed attacks gain Ensnare 1.
    Choose 2 abilities from the list.
  19. Like
    yeti1069 got a reaction from ZorinIchiona in Let's make "spells"   
    I used some of what others have already written as a baseline to write my own version of Enchantment. How does this look?
    Enchantment
    Concentration: Yes
    Skills: Arcana, Primal
    Select a single creature or minion group within Short range and make an Easy (d) Magic check. If successful, the target is filled with a specific emotion or sensation of your choice, such as anger, attraction, calm, disgust, fear, friendliness, or peace. All social checks the target makes are either upgraded or downgraded once to reflect this altered mental state.
    After the spell ends, the target is aware that they were feeling or behaving unusally.
    Additional Effects
    +d    Additional Target: May select additional targets equal to your ranks in Knowledge. May spend aa to select additional targets equal to your ranks in Knowledge for each     aa spent.
    +d    Easy Feeling: After the spell's effects end, the target no longer is suspicious of their emotional state or actions.
    +dd    Suggestion: Your target takes a suggested action or maneuver associated with the emotion you have instilled in them, such as attacking someone in anger, hitting on     someone they are attracted to, calmy taking a rest, disgusted avoiding someone or something, running away from something in fear, offering assistance to someone     they feel friendly toward, or attempting a peaceful resolution to a conflict. You may offer a suggestion each round as part of maintaining concentration on the spell.
    +dd    Forgetfulness: The target has no recollection of what transpired while under the effects of the spell.
    +ddd    Charm: The target feels particularly friendly to the caster, or a single target the caster designates, doing anything they would normally do for a dear friend.
    +ddd    Dominate: The target obeys all commands of the caster, even those contrary to its nature. The target may attempt a Discipline vs Discipline check as an action on their     turn in order to break free of this mental control, receiving a number of b on their check if your commands have been agaisnt their nature. This cannot be combined with the Additional Target effect.
     
    I'm not sure Charm and Suggestion are different enough to warrant having the two separate effects. It could mean reversing their difficulty, where Charm provides the friendly feeling, but you have little control over what they do: "Help me out" could result in a wide variety of actual actions. While Suggestion could be a bit more specific in what you're trying to get them to do?
    I was thinking Dominate should be dddd, but I wanted it to be able to combine with Easy Feeling. It would be nice to allow it to combine with Forgetfulness also, but maybe that's something that should only be doable with an implement or talent reducing difficulty for this?
    I feel like this does a fair job of not trampling on the other spells in what it is doing and trying to do. The upgrade/downgrade on social skills is a little bit like what Augment and Curse do, but a) more specific, b) more vague, c) doesn't affect combat rolls, or rolls critical to survival (like resisting spells or hazards), and d) is on the more narrative end of the spectrum as far as spells are concerned, which seems appropriate.
     
     
     
  20. Like
    yeti1069 got a reaction from ESP77 in Let's make "spells"   
    For Necromancy, I was playing around with some ideas all day...
    Add it as Additional Effects to Conjuration.
    Require a talent that modifies how you use the base Conjuration, and then adds new Additional Effects. 
    Separate spell. 
     
    On the last, I was thinking something like the following:
    Necromancy: D: Works like the basic Conjuration + Summon Ally, except you may only raise a dead character or creature, and it is undead, either a skeleton or a zombie, GM's choice or caster's choice (or based on circumstances). Instead of spending 2 Strain to cast this spell, you must spend 2 Wounds.
    D: Additional Summon: Works same as for Conjuration, except you may spend 1 Wound or ^^ to summon another undead minion. 
    D: Medium Summon: Works the same as Conjuration. 
    D: Grand Summon: Works the same as Conjuration. 
    D: Bolster Undead: Undead you raise add damage to their attacks equal to your ranks in Knowledge, and improve their Crit rating by 1, to a minimum of 1. Affects one target of the spell. You may pay 1 Wound to affect an additional target up to the number of raised undead, or your Wound threshold. 
    DD: Drain Life: If you select this Additional Effect when casting Necromancy, you first suffer 2 strain, and make an attack against a living creature at Short or Engaged range. If the check is successful, it deals damage equal to your casting characteristic plus any uncancelled *. You may treat the damage dealt after soak as Wounds for the purpose of paying for the basic spell and any additional effects of the spell. For example, if you cast Necromancy with Additional Summon and Bolster Undead, and you successfully dealt 6 damage to a target, you could spend that 6 damage to pay for the 2 Wounds for the basic effect of the spell, 2 wounds to raise an additional 2 undead, and 2 wounds to affect all 3 with Bolster Undead without suffering any wounds yourself. 
  21. Like
    yeti1069 got a reaction from ESP77 in Let's make "spells"   
    After spending more time on it, I'm thinking shapechanging could just be a subset of Additional Effects added to Augment. 
     
    D: Alter Self: Change features of appearance, sex, race, grow or shrink a small amount (within same silhouette). May spend ^^ to mimic the appearance of someone else (upon examination, may substitute your casting skill for a Deception check to disguise your appearance). 
    D: Growth: May grow or shrink 1 Sil from your base Sil, to a minimum of 0. Shrinking adds B to your Stealth and Coordination checks. Growing adds a B to your Athletics and Resilience checks. If you achieve Sil 3 or higher, Brawl and Melee checks you perform increase their range to Short. May be used multiple times. 
    DD: Polymorph (Primal Only): Gain 1 of several benefits:
    Hands and feet turn into fins, and you grow gills. You may function normally underwater, and add B per * to your Athletics checks to swim.  Arms turn into wings, granting the ability to hover or fly, and add B per * to your Coordination checks to fly. Eyes grow large and avian, granting Darkvision (remove 2 SB from checks due to darkness), and add B per * to your Perception and Ranged attacks. Ears grow large, granting (something), and add B per * to your Vigilance checks.  Hands or feet grow clawed (this replaces Primal Fury, granting the same effects) <insert one or two other similar effects>  May spend ^^ to gain an additional transformation benefit, or gain the benefit without replacing your existing features (such as by growing wings from your back, rather than transforming your arms). 
     
    I would say Duration: Concentration, or adding a D: Extend duration for number of rounds equal to twice ranks in Knowledge would make sense here. 
     
    The list of effects you listed for Polymorph (and that I was tinkering with all day) just felt too much like they were stepping on the toes of Augment and Barrier, so it seemed to me like it would make more sense to just wrap them into Augment, especially since the base ability covers what most players would use such an ability for anyway: improving their rolls. 
  22. Like
    yeti1069 got a reaction from Richardbuxton in Let's make "spells"   
    I'd like one of the effects to work off of ranks in Knowledge, and I'm thinking that should be Additional, losing the ability to increase the number for Advantage spent. That caps the number you can raise at 5 (if you invest heavily), but means you probably get a minion group 3 or 4 deep.
    I would probably add text to Champion prohibiting using Additional with it.
    I do kind of want to add an effect that makes the raised undead permanent, requiring no concentration, but maybe that should be on an implement of some kind, or a narrative effect (undead created within extreme range of an unholy altar persist without requiring concentration from the caster so long as they remain within range of the altar).
  23. Like
    yeti1069 got a reaction from Richardbuxton in Zombies   
    I'd also like to put together a Zombie Template to apply to other creatures (non-humanoids really).
     
  24. Like
    yeti1069 got a reaction from Richardbuxton in Zombies   
    Zombie (Minion)
    Brawn 2, Agility 2, Intellect 1, Cunning 2, Willpower 1, Presence 1
    Wound Threshold 4, Soak 3, Defense 0 | 0
    Skills: Brawl, Vigilance, Athletics
    Abilities: Implacable: Exceeding a zombie's wound threshold has no effect: they do not become incapacitated or die, and they do not suffer a critical injury. The only way to kill a zombie is to score a critical hit.
    Clawing hands (Brawl; Damage 3; Critical 4; Range [Engaged]; Ensnare 1)
    Raised Soak by 1, rather than add Defense, but I'm not sure which I would prefer. Obviously, soak isn't going to be super-meaningful, although there is the possibility of someone scoring a hit, with a critical, but not dealing enough damage to bypass soak (seriously doubtful). Defense would make them more resilient, but where are they getting defense from?
  25. Like
    yeti1069 got a reaction from Richardbuxton in Zombies   
    I like just adding Ensnare to their attack profile, better, I think, than Grapple. Would you make it Ensnare 1?
    Light Bane seems severe, removing a single minion per round.
     
    I'm considering allowing an Attack spell with the Holy/Unholy Additional Effect to kill Implacable zombies. I feel like spells without the Deadly effect added are going to have a very difficult time with zombies... Burn might make sense as well, as fire is often a way to get rid of them also...but I don't want to tack on a bunch of exceptions to the clean language of Implacable.
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