Jump to content

yeti1069

Members
  • Content Count

    611
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by yeti1069

  1. Seems reasonable. Could also use Despair for that.
  2. Here's what I have so far: Dwarves Brawn 2, Agility 1, Intellect 2, Cunning 2, Willpower 3, Presence 2 WT: 11 + Brawn ST: 10 + Willpower XP: Tough As Nails Strong Backed Children of the Frost (live in northern mountains on western continent; cold; tough; skilled with metal and stone crafts) Dark Vision Cold Adapted: Remove b from skill checks imposed due to cold Starting skills: Resilience 1 Children of the Falls (live in waterfall-riddled mountains toward the south of the eastern continent; warm; often most reasonable of the races on the gold dragon’s council) Kill With Kindness: Remove b from Charm and Negotiation checks Low-light Vision Starting skills: Cool 1 Children of the Foam (live upon the sea; dwarves who long ago left one of the dwarghomes in search of the rest of the people and became enamored with the sea—usually merchants or pirates) Sea Tossed: Remove b from skill checks imposed due to wind or rain Born Sailor: Remove b on skills checks relating to sailing or boating (dealing with rigging, navigation on the sea, piloting, or fishing, etc...) Starting skills: Athletics 1 Elves Brawn 2, Agility 3, Intellect 2, Cunning 2, Willpower 1, Presence 2 WT: 9 + Brawn ST: 10 + Willpower XP: Keen Eyed: Add b on Perception and Vigilance checks. Decrease the time to search a specific area by half. Sun/Faean (firstborn; most fey- and magic-attuned; snooty, more inclined to cogitation than action; crafters, experimenters) Magical Heritage: Learn one spell of no more than 2 difficulty. You may cast this spell using the Discipline skill, or the appropriate Magic skill if you’re trained in it Starting skills: Discipline 1 Twilight/Wood (secondborn; prefer the woods, and low-light conditions; friendly, but isolated) Swift: Move through difficult terrain unfettered Nimble Starting skills: Survival 1 Shadow/Deep (thirdborn; removed to the dark parts of the world, mostly far underground; extremely isolated) Dark Vision Isolated: Add b to Charm, Deception, Leadership, and Negotiation checks made against, or by other species, and on Knowledge (Community) checks for other locales Stealthy: Remove b from Stealth checks Doughty Dim-dweller: Add b on checks vs fear Starting skills: Knowledge (Forbidden) 1 Half-Elf Starting skills: Gain 1 rank in a non-career skill, and Linguistics 1 Elven Heritage: select one ability from another elf Mixed Heritage: In situations where being either an elf or a human would be more or less beneficial, may make an Average (dd) Deception check to pass as whichever of the two you prefer Gnomes Brawn 1, Agility 2, Intellect 2, Cunning 2, Willpower 2, Presence 3 WT: 8 + Brawn ST: 11 + Willpower XP: Small: Silhouette 0 Stronger Than I Look: Remove b from Resilience checks, and increase encumbrance threshold by 2 Brightkin (exuberant; prefer living aboveground in airy, well-lit areas; friendly) Plucky: Add b on fear checks made by the gnome and their allies within short range Starting skills: Charm 1 Shadekin (somewhat dour; prefer living underground; closer in disposition and preferences to their dwarven cousins; have been more engaged in conflict over their history; hard to deal with) Dark Vision Stubborn: Add b to social skill checks targeting them Underfoot Combat: Add b to combat checks targeting foes of a larger silhouette than themselves Halflings Brawn 1, Agility 3, Intellect 2, Cunning 2, Willpower 2, Presence 2 WT: 10 + Brawn ST: 10 + Willpower XP: Small: Silhouette 0 Indomitable: Remove b caused by critical injuries, the Disoriented condition, and on fear checks Burrowers (think traditional hobbits; cheery, living in elaborate holes or mounds; inclined to pastoral pursuits) . Climbers (somewhat more adventurous; prefers living in trees; employ gliders occasionally; tend to keep to themselves) . Swimmers (adventurous; many take to sailing or traveling) . Sylphs(from the plane of cold, air, and water) Brawn 2, Agility 2, Intellect 3, Cunning 2, Willpower 1, Presence 2 WT: 9 + Brawn ST: 10 + Willpower XP: . Mistborn . Breezeborn . Amaranthine (my version of Samsarans; inherited memories of their past lives; inherently magical, attuned to the magical energies of the world) Brawn 2, Agility 2, Intellect 3, Cunning 1, Willpower 2, Presence 2 WT: 8 + Brawn ST: 12 + Willpower XP Thaumaturgic (some inherent magical ability) . Cogitoric (Some inherent recollection or knowledge) . Oread (from the fire elemental plane, creatures composed of rock; similar in stature to dwarves) Brawn 2, Agility 2, Intellect 2, Cunning 2, Willpower 3, Presence 1 WT: 12 + Brawn ST: 10 + Willpower XP Crystalline . Metalline . Ursus (anthropomorphic bears from the plane of cold; tribal;, nomadic, hunters difficulty dealing with other humanoids in diplomatic fashion, but capable of approaching situations without violence) Brawn 3, Agility 2, Intellect 2, Cunning 2, Willpower 2, Presence 1 WT: 13 + Brawn ST: 9 + Willpower XP Claws Maritimus (polar bear-based) . Rusfelt (brown-bear based) . Saraphim (similar to Aasimar, I suppose...semi-angelic-seeming creatures from the positive plane) Brawn 2, Agility 2, Intellect 2, Cunning 1, Willpower 2, Presence 3 WT: 11 + Brawn ST: 11 + Willpower XP Rampant . Celebrant . Winnowers (odd, humanoids from the negative plane; sneaky, though not necessarily evil; shy; shunned by many) Brawn 2, Agility 1, Intellect 2, Cunning 3, Willpower 2, Presence 2 WT: 9 + Brawn ST: 9 + Willpower XP Quencher . Queller (negates or resists magic in some fashion) . Orks Brawn 3, Agility 2, Intellect 1, Cunning 2, Willpower 2, Presence 2 WT: 11 + Brawn ST: 8 + Willpower XP Blackskinned . Greenskinned . Halfblood Gain 1 rank in a non-career skill, and Coercion 1 Orkish Heritage: select one ability from another ork Mixed Heritage: In situations where being either an ork or a human would be more or less beneficial, may make an Average (dd) Deception check to pass as whichever of the two you prefer Emberkin (small fire beings from the fire plane; tricksy, but not smart) Brawn 2, Agility 2, Intellect 1, Cunning 3, Willpower 2, Presence 2 WT: 8 + Brawn ST: 11 + Willpower XP Small: Silhouette 0 Smoulderkin . Flamekin . Entling (young ent) Brawn 3, Agility 1, Intellect 2, Cunning 1, Willpower 2, Presence 2 WT: 14 + Brawn ST: 11 + Willpower XP: Large: Silhouette 2 Coniferous . Deciduous . Human Brawn 2, Agility 2, Intellect 2, Cunning 2, Willpower 2, Presence 2 WT: 10 + Brawn ST: 10 + Willpower XP: 110 Ready For Anything Honrolaydean . Aurumlander . Dunedweller (thinking from the southwestern desert) . Font-Touched (from the far east, near the positive plane) .
  3. Is damage caused by a hazardous environment, such as caustic atmosphere, or lava, get reduced by soak? It seems a little silly to me that hazardous atmosphere could be ignored thanks to someone wearing good armor while breathing it in. Similarly, lava doesn't seem all that dangerous if someone with a soak of 7 or 8 is only taking 2 or 3 damage each round. I've had characters in my game who would gladly wade through lava and pop a healing potion, rather than try to find a slower way around it.
  4. Reducing strain by 2 is almost never any different than taking 2 strain during an encounter. I don't believe I've seen a character recover to their full strain during an encounter, so that's not much of a cost; it's certainly a much better deal than spending 2 strain per round on a 2nd maneuver. My thinking was that the talent should be valuable, but not so good that once acquired it's always used. One issue is that I'm not sure that there are enough maneuvers for casters to take that are valuable enough to be superseding concentration all that often.
  5. The idea was inspired by the "commit a Force die" mechanic from the Star Wars FFG line. Also, being able to maintain concentration on a spell without spending a maneuver is a pretty big deal--it saves you potentially a ton of strain, not to mention action economy. Also, I'm looking at the high end of what's doable here, such as maintaining something like an Enervated Paralysis Curse. Being able to do that and cast Attack, and take two maneuvers (or 1 and suffer no strain for action economy) is a big deal.
  6. What do you all think of these? Invested Focus Tier: 5 Ranked: No You gain the Focused additional effect for any spell that allows for Concentration. This increases the difficulty of the check by 1. If successful, expend 2 additional strain and reduce your ranks in the associated Magic skill, and your associated characteristic by 1 each to maintain Concentration on the spell for as long as your ranks and characteristic remain lowered without having to spend a maneuver each round. Mystic Surge Tier: 4 Ranked: No Take the Mystic Surge maneuver to double the effects of the next spell you cast, before the end of your next turn. After casting that spell, you lose the ability to cast spells for the remainder of the encounter. (Summon an additional ally, double the damage dealt on Attack, increase the skills of a target affected by Augment twice, etc...).
  7. Just came up with a new idea! When taking first rank in a Magic skill, learn a number of spells equal to casting characteristic and for each rank in Magic you possess. Spells are specific combinations of a basic spell and some number of additional effects (the basic spell with no effects counts as one of these choices). Characters gain a new spell known each time they buy a rank in their magic skill. In addition, a character can flip a Story Point to attempt to cast a new spell in the heat of the moment. If they succeed, they may spend 2 Advantage or a Triumph to add that to their spells known. Spells cast that you don't already know have their difficulty upgraded twice. How does that look? Casters don't begin with all the options already, but they can progress and learn dynamically at need. Thoughts?
  8. This is really cool! Question: do characters gain access to all Magic actions available by skill they are trained in, or do they have to "learn" these somehow?
  9. How are Spells found and learned in your system?
  10. Thanks for that, Zsig! It's not so much that I feel like the Magic system as written is too strong, but it doesn't fit thematically, my idea of the world (and also, I feel like it doesn't fit the rest of Genesys' character development options) in giving all casters all their spells immediately. Yes, they have to improve to use the more difficult effects, but that's not the same thing. My issues with tying learning new spells (or any spells) to ranks in Magic, or a characteristic, are that A) no one else in Genesys gets to advance a character in that way--if anyone else wants more options, they buy talents, and if they want to get better at their primary focus, they invest in skill ranks and pick up Dedication, while B) it always looks like heavy double-dipping, since casters need skill ranks to improve, and buying those ranks grants more spells as well... Giving a mage all the spells right off the bat removes any sense of progression from the character: yeah, they can succeed at more difficult checks, but even a "novice" with a 2 in their characteristic and 1 rank can succeed on a 5 difficulty check some of the time, they'll just have a ton of threat.
  11. What I'm thinking so far: Dwarves: 3 Willpower, 1 Agility; Children of the Falls (from a warm southern kingdom), Children of the Frost (from cold mountains), Children of the Foam (seafarers); abilities under consideration: darkvision, a bonus on checks related to stone- and metal-craft, a bonus on resilience Elves: 3 Agility, 1 Willpower; Wood Elves, Faean (normally high elves; more magically inclined), Half-blood (half-elves), Shadowfolk (drow); abilities under consideration: bonus on Perception, the innate defense ability from the GCRB, a bonus on Knowledge skills, bonus to Charm or Negotiate, darkvision, maybe a special action that creates an area of darkness? Gnomes: 3 Presence, 1 Brawn; Brightkin (plucky, typical gnomes), Shadekin (live underground, secretive), Dwemerkin (closest to dwarves, maybe some shared ancestry) Halflings: 3 Agility, 1 Brawn; Burrowstock (Bilbo and Frodo), Fieldtenders, Treetreaders Orcs: 3 Brawn, 1 Presence; Goblin (smaller, more fearful, maybe a penalty on checks vs fear), Boarcine (larger, more brutish), Half-blood (half-orcs) From the Rymfell Sylphs -- 3 Cunning, 1 Willpower (thinking that while, yes, they are wispy, and airy, which leans toward Agility, to my mind they are more defined by they stealth and deceptive, secretive ways); Cloudpiercer, Breezewalker; wispy, born of the air and mist, these humanoids are curious and elusive, preferring to remain hidden from others, observing, and only occasionally inserting themselves into events Ursus -- 3 Brawn, Intellect 1 (could also do something like 4 Br, 1 Int, 1 Pr), but it seems so stereotypical to make them strong and dumb; Maritimus, Rusfelt; these are bear-like creatures; powerful, swift hunters, they are clannish but not necessarily warlike From the Caldera Oreads -- 3 Willpower, 1 Presence (thinking they are quiet and uncharismatic); Crystalline, Magmatic; these vaguely humanoid beings are composed of rock or crystal, sometimes glowing from within as if filled with magma, they harbor great wisdom behind their impenetrable lithic gaze Emberkin -- 3 Cunning, 1 Intellect (maybe); Smoulder, Flamekin; these creatures are small, not always of human shape, and burn as if made entirely of fire, though they do have a physical form beneath; they can be mischievous and disruptive From the Burgeoning Saraphim -- 3 Presence, 1 Cunning; Vibrant, Rampant, Celebrant; of angelic bearing, these humanoids almost seem to glow from within, and always seem to be bursting with life, often elevating those around them; rarely some are seen with great dove-like wings something else on theme? Maybe an Entling? But I don't know what stats it gets...maybe 3 Brawn, 1 Agility? From the Miasma Winnowers -- 3 Willpower, Brawn 1; Quencher, Queller; small shadowy creatures that have eked out an existence in the treacherous lands of undeath, they seek to form connections with other living beings, but struggle doing so: in some the Void has taken route and they are themselves inherently the negation of other life and light Other Beings of Margonis Amaranthine -- Intellect 3, Agility 1; reddish hued humanoids, often covered in strange glowing runes, these beings carry with them the experiences of their forebears, either in memory, or in the manifestation of some past magical ability Not sure that an even-enough distribution. Still hung up a little on what racial abilities and skills they should all be looking at.
  12. Some talents I came up with: Illusionist Tier: 2 Activation: Passive Ranked: No Gain a new Additional Effect you may add to any spell you cast. Decrease the difficulty of the spell by one to manifest the effects as an illusion rather than their normal effects. Checks to disbelieve your illusions are made against the Magic skill you used to create the effect. Intense Concentration Tier: 1 Activation: Passive Ranked: Yes Spells you concentrate on require an additional Threat to break concentration per rank of Intense Concentration. (RAWR this requires one T to negate a maneuver) Master Illusionist Tier: 4 Activation: Passive Ranked: No When you cast a spell with the Illusionist Additional Effect, you may spend a Story Point to increase the number or size of the effect(s) you manifest. (Not sure how to clarify this so it's less vague) Persistent Spell Tier: 3 Activation: Passive Ranked: No Gain a new Additional Effect you may add to any spell you cast that allows for concentration. Increase the difficulty of the spell by two to change the concentration of the spell to an Incidental on your next turn, instead of a maneuver. You may spend ^^ to extend this benefit for an additional round for each ^^ spent. Persistent Spell (Improved) Tier: 4 Activation: Passive Ranked: No The Persistent Spell Additional Effect only raises the difficulty of the spell by one. Persistent Spell (Supreme) Tier: 5 Activation: Passive Ranked: No When you cast a spell with the Persistent Spell Additional Effect, you may spend 2 strain as an Incidental on your turn to maintain concentration without having had to spend ^^ on the initial spell.
  13. Thanks for the tips, Cantriped! I'll post the characteristic arrays I'm considering later, along with some of the special abilities I've already got, but would welcome suggestions based on the (admittedly small amount of) flavor I've provided so far. I'm inclined to not change characteristic arrays much among the subspecies, but it may make sense in some cases. I also want to try to stay away from too many 3,3,1,1 arrays.
  14. I have a fantasy world that I've been working on for years (have run a few campaigns, first D&D 3.5, then Pathfinder, and now Genesys), and recently I've been expanding on the options and lore, but I'm a little stuck on the races at the moment. Briefly, the world of Margonis is flanked by 4 planes that blend directly with the world: Rymfell, a land of ice-filled waters and frigid winds; Caldera, a land of terrible volcanic activity, hot and barren; Burgeoning, a land of life run rampant, light, and blessing; and Miasma, a land so decrepit that it is beyond decay, antithesis of life, and home to the undead. In addition, there is a world of the fey hidden behind the normal world, and poking through in places. There are some of the standard fantasy races: elves, dwarves, halflings, gnomes, orcs But I want to populate the world with denizens from these other planes. So far, I have some rough ideas, but nothing concrete, and I'm looking for suggestions on characteristic arrays and interesting abilities that can help define each race. Ideally, I'd also like to break each race down into at least 2, or 3, sub-races for further variety and options. From the Rymfell Sylphs -- wispy, born of the air and mist, these humanoids are curious and elusive, preferring to remain hidden from others, observing, and only occasionally inserting themselves into events Ursus -- these are bear-like creatures; powerful, swift hunters, they are clannish but not necessarily warlike From the Caldera Oreads -- these vaguely humanoid beings are composed of rock or crystal, sometimes glowing from within as if filled with magma, they harbor great wisdom behind their impenetrable lithic gaze Emberkin -- these creatures are small, not always of human shape, and burn as if made entirely of fire, though they do have a physical form beneath; they can be mischievous and disruptive From the Burgeoning Saraphim -- of angelic bearing, these humanoids almost seem to glow from within, and always seem to be bursting with life, often elevating those around them; rarely some are seen with great dove-like wings something else on theme? From the Miasma Winnowers -- small shadowy creatures that have eked out an existence in the treacherous lands of undeath, they seek to form connections with other living beings, but struggle doing so: in some the Void has taken route and they are themselves inherently the negation of other life and light Other Beings of Margonis Amaranthine -- reddish hued humanoids, often covered in strange glowing runes, these beings carry with them the experiences of their forebears, either in memory, or in the manifestation of some past magical ability
  15. I definitely think that any talent should be a straight bonus to your encumbrance threshold, rather than a bonus to containers, as Cantriped pointed out. +2 Ranked as a tier 1 seems reasonable. +5 as a tier 2 seems better to me. The first is something I can see a lot of characters taking one rank of when they have a 3rd, 4th, or 5th tier 1 slot they need to fill, whereas the latter looks like something somebody who cares about encumbrance might take, but most other characters would pass by.
  16. What talents are your casters investing XP in?
  17. That's interesting...took a couple of read-throughs to realize how the Disciplines actually worked: ranks in <Magic> become ranks for individual spells. Power-level-wise, this looks pretty good... ...but I still don't think that addresses the options issue where everyone else is saying at "level 1": "Okay, situation X comes up. I haven't bought any talents yet, but I have a few ranks in skills scattered about, so I'll roll this 'naked' skill check." Then the mage says, "Well, I can upgrade my skills, or your skills, or summon a creature to address this situation, or an object, or grow wings, or simply stop that guy in place, or..."
  18. On top of all that, while I do want characters to be flexible and have options, by giving every caster all of the spells and effects at once, there's nothing mechanically to differentiate one from the other: everyone has all the spells, whereas if they are making choices on what to learn, that further defines their character.
  19. That's not restrictive, it's how every character works: want to be good at sneaking, buy ranks in Stealth. Want to be a strong melee fighter, buy ranks in Melee or Brawl. There are few effects that rely on Knowledge ranks, and Knowledge is useful beyond as an augment for a few spell effects. Players can ignore Knowledge, and ore make it part of their character otherwise. I had considered limiting spells by rank, but that's still easy access double-dipping, and nothing else in the game works that way: you don't get Dodge talents just because you invested in Coordination, or Frenzied Attack because you invested in Brawl...
  20. The issues I have with the default system are that casters have access to the entire repertoire of magic from the outset, while every non-magical character has to build up their abilities via talents: combatants start with an attack skill, then have to invest in talents to gain other options in combat; social characters have skill checks, and invest in talents for more social options, etc... Mages begin with all the options, then take talents to get better at those. Meanwhile, after having played in a couple of Star Wars campaigns, both before and after F&D I never really felt like I was way behind the rest of the party because I had to invest in Force powers and had to chase an increase to my Force Rating while they were gunning directly for Dedication. To clarify the Additional Effects talent I posted, on purchased ranks beyond the first, a character could learn 2 effects for one spell, or 1 effect for each of two spells. Numbers-wise, what I'm looking at is 2-3 game sessions' worth of XP devoted to casting results in 3 spells known and 3 additional effects known divided among those spells. Does that really seem much too restrictive? (tier 1 for a spell, tier 1 for additional effect, tier 2 for another spell, tier 1 whatever, tier 2 for 2 additional effects, tier 3 for another spell).
  21. One thing that has bothered my about Genesys (which I otherwise LOVE) is the lack of clarity (or options) on how characters gain access to magic. The implication in the rulebook is that ranks in a Magic skill are sufficient to cast any spells of the type associated with the chosen skill, along with all of their Additional Effects. This doesn't sit well with me, if for no other reason than that spells are similar to talents, with Additional Effects representing Improved and Supreme versions of talents, more or less, yet with 5 XP, a character gains access to a huge degree of flexibility. That all aside, onto my ideas! First, I was thinking that, similar to the Force in Edge of the Empire and Force and Destiny, the first "gating" of magic could come in the form of Careers. Genesys core has a series of careers that provide 8 class skills, 4 of which grant a starting rank at character creation, which on its own results in fewer career skills and fewer starting skill ranks than EotE and F&D presented, which had careers (again 8/4 for most characters), and specializations, which had 4 skills, 2 of which you gained a rank in at character creation. Obviously, Genesys did away with specializations. In F&D, Force-sensitive careers began with only 6 skills, allowing for a pick of 3, but also granted access to the Force with a Force Rating of 1. The specializations still had the 4/2 model. My starting point here is to do something similar. Create a few (thinking 2 per magic skill) careers that grant access to a particular Magic skill, but they come with only 6 career skills, from which characters get 3 ranks. Next, make a longer list of specializations, some of which are the usual 4/2 skill breakdown, but make some others that are 2/1, while also granting access to a Magic skill. In this way, all non-magical characters would have 12 career skills with 6 starting free ranks, while mages would have 10 career skills with 5 starting free ranks. The thought here was that players can mix and match a bit--someone could choose a merchantile career and add to it some weapons training, or pick a career as a soldier then add to it some magical ability. A character with "Magical Training" automatically gains the Utility spell, and can cast other spells that they have access to... New Talent Basic Spell: Tier I <ranked> Prerequisite: Magical Training Upon selecting this talent choose one basic spell to add to your list of spells known. That seems like a good balance for gating access to magic. Characters who want to be mages can spend their first 5 XP (likely during character creation) to pick up their first spell. The second spell isn't too hard to get, but the 3rd and beyond are going to take some time. New Talent Advanced Spellcasting: Tier I <ranked> Prerequisite: Basic Spell Upon selecting this talent for the first time, choose one Additional Effect for a spell you know to gain access to. Each further rank grants access to two Additional Effects. Again, this seems like it sets a low bar for a little variety and flexibility, but ensures that characters don't have all the options right away. New Talent Magical Training: Tier III (considering 4, or 5 as well) Choose one Magic skill. It becomes a career skill for you, gain access to the Utility spell. This is for characters who want to pick up magic later in their adventuring careers. It may require calling out that it cannot be selected if the character already has Magical Training. Wondering whether this should be a higher tier. New Talent Mystic Mastery: Tier V Prerequisite: Magical Training Choose one Magic skill that you do not already have access to as a career skill. It is now a career skill for you, and you may cast spells associated with that skill. What do you all think? Are these too restrictive? No restrictive enough?
  22. Yes! I don't know that summoning an undead is necessarily weaker than summoning something else to justify it being easier to perform, which is part of the reason I made it its own separate spell. Oh, yeah, should have had additional summon. Bolster makes more sense than the +1 Brawn I had. I had considered something like drain life, but I feel like that treads too heavily on Attack's toes. There is probably an extra effect there for Attack (although there are Runeshards that confer that benefit, I think).
  23. I really like most of these! Additional sense is really interesting. I had been considering Ensnare for Hinder as well, but figured it might be too strong? Would a single activation affect everyone within the fog? Otherwise it's probably too expensive to activate. Lightning (stun) I was thinking was in the same boat. Holy/Unholy looks great, as does Manupulative! Sleep seems problematic. One Way is cool, and reminds me I had intended to have an exclusion option that makes one target, +1/A spent immune to the effects therein. Illusion...I'm not sure what the functional difference would be. Thank you!
×
×
  • Create New...