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winterdyne

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  1. Pics are 1024 square, should be big enough if you click on 'em.
  2. But... but... x-wing stuff paints up so nice....
  3. Client wanted a change to the bloodstriped interceptor; so this is a fresh model (easier than tweaking over the paintjob), along with the rest of the squadron. Fun!
  4. Client wanted a change to the bloodstriped interceptor; so this is a fresh model (easier than tweaking over the paintjob), along with the rest of the squadron. Fun!
  5. Small Interceptor commission job: First up, an ace with bloodstripes. More to come tomorrow.
  6. First up, an ace with bloodstripes. More to come tomorrow.
  7. I took inspiration for the markings from the Fine Molds 1/48 tie. Port side has a small red pentagon, starboard is a 'tally/numeral' type (combination of one, two or three horizontal dashes, and one or two or three vertical dashes). No real thought given to actual numbering, just went with what looked nice. Port side lower has kill markings. I'll get a better set of shots of Howlrunner herself at some point.
  8. Some shots of Howlrunner and her wingmen:
  9. Fairly sure a version of the Dunelizard Hutt fighter could take an astromech.
  10. winterdyne

    Painting advice

    With any complex freehand pattern, the key is understanding it. Checkers, for example rely on spacing - how many squares over how big an area - to get it working you need to make the same number of regular divisions in the same space. That's the key to the pattern (not necessarily, as you might think, drawing straight lines and having them cross). Straight lines only really become an issue when long (more than about 4mm). I mark out checkers with dots, each one the 'corner' of what will be a square. These mark imaginary lines (or close to it, you can fix it as you go) that you want to paint 'up' to. Start closer to the centre of a square you're filling and work up to the lines. Repeat for alternate squares. Houndstooth pattern is a pattern-in-a-pattern - start with a straight, checker pattern, but you fill every other square on every other row (so you effectively have a wide grid). Then on every other square that isn't filled, cross hatch it in 4 sections, and keep the triangles adjacent to a filled square that colour. Sabine's TIE is a mess, many patterns and many different divisions to do, and some long lines to paint - again these are all about spacing - so work 'up' to lines, not 'from' them. It's often well worth sketching the pattern on paper, even worth a practice run with paint on a flat piece of plastic if you feel it needs it.
  11. Having just repainted a bunch of TIEs, there's no need to dismantle them at all. Just take off the base and pegs, shove a cocktail stick in the mount, mask the mount and off you go. The only reason you might want to pull the wing off is if you're planning on a complex design on the inside surface, and even then it's really fairly accessible.
  12. I think uniquely named generics like that would make for great Tourney prize cards. Neat.
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