admutt

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  1. Genesys Dice and Random Encounter Tables

    I agree that index cards can be a great tool in this way too. For the right GM, anyway -- I generally find them too fiddly, in a physical-interaction sense. Every GM is going to have different requirements for their game. Index cards require a degree of dexterity that some of us might be lacking; flipping through a binder with some pages of tables (or not-tables; lists, related images or phrases, for instance) can be much easier. Also, a single page with a bunch of related ideas on it can itself be a springboard to more ideas when looked at as a whole. As far as the original idea of this thread goes, there's something appealing about finding more ways to use the narrative dice. Maybe this one's a bit complicated, but there's a germ here somewhere ...
  2. Genesys Dice and Random Encounter Tables

    I don't think any of that precludes having a random encounter table to draw from as well. Players rolled excess Threat? Consult your list of Market Threats (or City Threats; whatever you've prepared). I agree that thinking about this as a table might be too daunting though. Maybe laying both dice out on a grid and filling in the resultant boxes would make it easier to visualize? Or maybe use the Genesys Dice with a Die Drop Table -- those are always fun to make. Either way, I think there's something in this idea that would make for another good GMing tool in this system. No issues - I'm all for polite discussion. I don't really think of tables like this as restrictions, just as additional prompts for the GM. I know I've run sessions where I've been too tired to easily come up with something on the fly. Having some cool tables to roll on would have been a nice bonus -- not a crutch to use all the time, but just something to use off and on when the ideas aren't quite flowing. Or to build off of -- just because you've written something in the table, doesn't mean you have to stick with it word-for-word. Or to use as a phrase to prompt ideas from the players -- that's always more fun!
  3. Genesys Dice and Random Encounter Tables

    Early morning shopping in the market? What's going on? Random Encounter tables are a traditional way to introduce new plots and story elements into a campaign. YMMV. While a d100 table is easy enough to set up, I think that using the narrative dice symbols might add a level of thought to that creation.
  4. Genesys Dice and Random Encounter Tables

    Yes, of course. This idea was more for the old hex-crawl application; enter a new territory and see what's happening/threatening.
  5. Has anyone started using the Narrative Dice for random encounter tables? I was thinking about how this might work. We've all seen straight d20/d100 tables of random encounters -- basically long lists of creatures, traps, what have you. Generally boring, unless you create the table with story in mind, and limited in how the creator of the table weights each result (ie: 1, 2, 3 versus 1-5, 6-15, etc). However, with the Narrative Dice you have a built-in prompt while you're creating the tables for interesting encounters; Advantage, Threat, Despair, Triumph, etc. So, I (think I have) figured out what all the possible results would be if you rolled 1 Proficiency Die and 1 Challenge Die together (note: I separated the Failures from the Despairs and the Successes from the Triumphs here to help with prompting). There are 32 results in the table. --blank-- a ad aa aaf aafd aaff af afd aff d f fd ft ff fh s sd st sa ss ssh sshh sh sht shh shht h ht t td hh Once you have the table filled out you could use any combination of "1 good + 1 bad" dice to make the roll. Depending on the combination (the threat level of the region the table applies to), you'll change the range of results, but you wouldn't need to roll on a new table. Comments? Opinions? Am I on to something here? Would it be even better with more dice? Fewer dice?
  6. Vector Character Sheet

    @drainsmith I printed it out in black & white; lines look sharp, but the dotted boxes and circles are a bit faint - is there anything you can do about that? Otherwise, the skills page, weapons section and character info section are all perfect. The characteristics, attributes and xp graphics all look a bit over-sized though. It's understandable that the sheets are going to have to have a different flow to them to make the format work, but that's just something we'll all have to get used to if we want to use these bigger sheets. Thanks for doing this!
  7. For Kids?

    What sorts of TV shows are they watching? The "Tails of Equestria" RPG might provide some ideas for encouraging Friendship in a game environment. Also, and I'm not sure if this is the correct age group, the Paw Patrol TV show is all about overcoming challenges through skill - you could look to that and see what sorts of skills the characters in the show use and then replace many (if not all) of the aggressive Genesys skills. Paw Patrol, in particular, could provide a framework for adding real world learning into the game, as the characters often have to research some specific knowledge each episode. If you do use their favorite TV shows for inspiration, don't forget to "re-brand" the characters into your own setting/universe! You could re-skin combat as the need to score x number of successes against a puzzle or challenge. Basically, give your puzzles a wound threshold. Sports you might have to break down into some kind of rounds - I'm pretty sure the kids would not be happy to just roll once and win/lose a game. I hope those ideas help!
  8. Vector Character Sheet

    @drainsmith - first, thank you for doing this! Second, would you be able to use these sheets to make a landscape version with BIGGER TEXT? It's come up a few times (with both SW and Genesys official sheets) that the font is awfully small and hard to read (specially for those of us who's eyeballs are getting older). Multi-page character sheets are fine, it's just that some of us would like to see the information presented in a larger format without going to larger paper (like GM Kaitlin's ).
  9. Tracking Party Relationships

    UPDATE: Fixed the wording. Hopefully it's more obvious as to the costs (Strain) and rewards (XP). FELLOWSHIP Fellowship is represented by the Bonds a Player Character has with the people(s) in the setting. These Bonds may be anything that ties a Player Character to a person or a group (a feeling of responsibility for a friend's well-being, the duty they feels to help their family, or a favor owed to someone else). Bond are often built around something one character admires about another. A character's actions can often be guided by their Bonds. BONDS Each Player Character starts with one Moderate Bond with another Player Character (see table 1-1 Bond Values). Each Bond consists of three parts: 1. A proper noun (character's or group's name) 2. A narrative description of the Bond. This does not have any rules effect, but is intended to offer an explanation that allows the player to work the Bond into their character's story. 3. A numeric value: This represents the weight of the Bond and determines it's in-game effects. Players may choose to begin play with more than one Bond or split their initial Bond Value between multiple Player Characters. TABLE 1-1: FOCUS VALUES Bond Value Strength of Bond 5 weak 10 moderate 15 strong 20 extreme FELLOWSHIP IN PLAY Before each session, the GM rolls percentile dice, compares the results to the group's current Fellowship (the table discussed in "Assembling the Group's Fellowship") and interprets the results as detailed below. FELLOWSHIP CHECK RESULTS If the Fellowship roll is greater than the party's total Fellowship, then their bonds are not affecting them - at least for now. There are no in-game effects for this session. If the roll is equal to or less than the group's total Fellowship, something related to their bonds may introduce complications during the upcoming session: First, rolling equal to or lower than the group's Fellowship means that all player characters reduce their Strain Threshold by 1 for the duration of the session. In addition, the GM can determine exactly whose Bond was triggered by comparing the results of the roll to the chart. This Player Character reduces their Strain Threshold by 2 (instead of 1) for the duration of the session. Finally, if the GM triggered a Bond and the roll was doubles (an"11" or a"44" for example), the effects of triggering that Bond also double. All Player Characters reduce their strain threshold by 2 for the remainder of the session, and the Player Character whose Bond was triggered reduces his strain threshold by 4. These mechanical effects represent either internal or external pressure on the Player Characters as a result of their Bond. The Bond may even take center stage in the upcoming session. REWARDS Regardless, the Player Character whose Bond was triggered during the session gains 5 XP (10 XP if the roll was doubles) at the end of the session if they were able to work the triggered Bond into at least one scene during the session the Bond was triggered for and Resolve the Bond. When a Bond is Resolved, it is removed from the Player Character's Bond List. The player may replace the Bond at the end of the following session. CHANGING FELLOWSHIP Throughout the course of play, Bonds can (and should) change. At the end of any session, a player may change the balance of their Player Character's Bond or remove a Bond that no longer applies or matters. A new Bond can only be added at the end of a session following a session where a Bond was triggered and Resolved. Bonds should grow organically out of the narrative of the completed session. A player's character must always have at least one other player's character in their Bonds list. ASSEMBLING THE GROUP'S FELLOWSHIP Once each player in the group has picked their character's Bonds, the GM assembles all of the Bonds into a single table. The table should have four columns. The first is the column that contains each Bonds' value. The second column details the bond. The third column records the character to whom each Bond belongs. The fourth column should be used to label the rows based on the Bond Value in a manner that assists in rolling a d100. FELLOWSHIP CAP With extended play, Fellowship can easily top 100, which makes any Bond above 100 impossible to roll on a single d100. Here is one method to handle this; Begin a new table with each player's character's Bonds ranked based on their percentage of the total Fellowship. Include an extra Fellowship at 5% to leave some uncertainty. Then each player's character would have its own sub-table to roll on. You can continue to proceed in this fashion, creating fractal tables if the number of bonds continues to grow.
  10. So, here's another kick at the tires of Initiative. Not necessarily an improvement over RAW. Wondering if it's worth trying out at all; Initiative Slots are determined by Skill Rank in descending order from Rank 5, PC slots first, NPC slots second. PCs and NPCs can act in any slot as per RAW. And that's it. A small change to remove some of randomness (and speed up initial initiative assignment?), but still allow for the flexibility we all like. Also, it rewards players who buy up Vigilance and Cool. The Rapid Reaction talent would have to change; instead of adding successes, maybe adding temporary skill ranks for initiative order determination?
  11. Better late than never, right? I finally got around to creating some talents for this system. Again, it's untested at the moment, but I have two groups willing to give it a try at our weekly games. I'll update again after we've had a chance to run it through the wringer. Free-Form Magic System; Magic is about imposing your will on the world around you. Anything that you can imagine, you can try to make a part of reality as long as your attempt respects the law of conservation of mass and energy. Put another way, it's about convincing one form of matter that it wants to undergo a change in state; to be something else. Magic Magic is a separate Attribute with a value that can only be increased above zero via the Arcane Ability talent. All characters have access to the Arcane Ability talent at any time. This is the talent that allows a character to manipulate magical energies and impose their will on reality. A character with a Magic Attribute of zero may not perform Magic actions. Magic Actions To use Magic, a character must spend a Maneuver to focus their thoughts and an Action to perform the Magic. These do not need to be immediately sequential and the character may perform other Maneuvers prior to performing the Magic Action as long as the character does not lose consciousness between the two Magic Actions. Difficulty of Magic Magic is generally unpredictable and difficult to manipulate, thus any Magic check has it's difficulty Upgraded four times before the roll. (This means the minimum difficulty is actually 2 Challenge Dice for a Simple Check.) RESULTS; Each uncanceled Failure results in 1 point of Wound Damage to the Magic user. Uncanceled Threat may result in Strain Damage to the Magic user. Each Despair may result in a Critical Injury to the Magic User (limited to once per Magic Action). Advantage, Success and Triumph can be spent as normal (increase effects, apply Qualities, etc.) MODIFIERS; Boost and Setback dice may be added/removed based on the following; situational and environmental conditions (eg: drawing lightning from a cloudy sky / clear sky / underground) specific knowledge needed for success (see Knowledge Table below) Knowledge Table If a character is attempting to perform some Magic that would benefit from specific Knowledge (such as creating a permanent dwelling, building a bridge, etc.) or another Skill (such as Medicine), consult the following table; Skill Rank Boost Dice Setback Dice 0 -- + 2 1 – + 1 2 -- -- 3 + 1 -- 4 + 2 -- 5 + 2 - 1 Characters can collect Treatise on various sciences written from a Magical perspective. Characters don't need to have Knowledge in different Sciences to be able to wield Magic, but having this Knowledge would Boost their understanding of what they are attempting to do. Attacking With Magic A character may forgo using a Maneuver to focus their Magic in order to send out a raw blast of power in a specific direction. This Raw Magic follows the rules for attacking with a ranged weapon and does Willpower + Magic Ranks as its base damage. Furthermore, a character may use any 2 remaining Advantages to activate a “weapon” quality on the attack as normal. Wound Thresholds and Inanimate Objects This is still to be tested, but I recommend giving inanimate objects a number of wounds equal to their Size/Silhouette. This way, breaking a lock or a door is a trivial matter, but tearing down an entire building becomes something more ambitious. Silhouette and Self Here, conservation of mass is an issue – you have to figure out what to do with the particles of that NPC that won't be part of the rat (unless you're planning on a VERY large rat). Also, a character's sense of self will play a roll in resisting this sort of Magic. Notes on Magic Actions As an Action, using Magic is regarded much like an Attack Action or an Opposed Check. Want to heal your allies? You're rolling against the severity of the wounds. Want to charm an NPC? You're rolling against their appropriate Social Skill. Want to hurl fire at an attacker? You're rolling a ranged attack.* Want to break down a door? You're rolling an attack against an inanimate object that likely has a Wound Threshold** Want to transform that pesky NPC into a rat? You're rolling against their Silhouette and their Self*** Magic Talents Arcane Ability Tier: 1 Activation: Passive Ranked: Yes Gain +1 Magic Attribute. The value of the character's Magic Attribute can be used as a Skill Rank linked to Willpower for performing Magic Actions. My Will Prevails Tier: 1 Activation: Passive Ranked: Yes The character gains +1 Upgrade on Magic Action skill checks. Magic Touch Tier: 3 Activation: Passive Ranked: No The character adds 1 Boost die to their Magic Action skill checks. Magic Will Tier: 3 Activation: Passive Ranked: No The character removes 1 Setback die from their Magic Action skill checks. Magic Wise(Selection) Tier 4: Activation: Active(Incidental) The character chooses one other Characteristic that they can use for Magic Actions. Once per Magic Action, the character may use this other Characteristic as their linked Characteristic where the desired effects of the Magic Action fall under that Characteristic's purview. This Talent may be bought more than once, but only once for each additional Characteristic. Magic Touch, Improved Tier: 5 Activation: Passive Ranked: No The character adds 2 Boost dice to their Magic Action skill checks. The effects of this talent replace those from Magic Touch. Magic Will, Improved Tier: 5 Activation: Passive Ranked: No The character removes 2 Setback dice from their Magic Action skill checks. The effects of this talent replace those from Magic Will. Magic Manipulator Tier: 5 Activation: Passive Ranked: No The character downgrades the Difficulty of their Magic Action skill checks once. Magic Manipulator, Improved Tier: 5 Activation: Passive Ranked: No The character downgrades the Difficulty of their Magic Action skill checks twice. The effects of this talent replace those from Magic Manipulator.
  12. Tracking Party Relationships

    Okay, here's my first pass at this. The idea is to give some mechanical weight to inter-party relationships. By opening this up to NPC and other setting relationships, it becomes a tool for the GM to see what parts of the setting have gotten the players' attentions. Also, by using the same sort of mechanic as Obligation, it provides a beginning-of-session reminder to the entire table about the nature of their relationships. Untested, but hopefully useful; FELLOWSHIP Fellowship plays a vital role in defining a Player Character. Defined simply, Fellowship represents the bonds a Player Character has. These bonds may be anything that ties a Player Character to someone or something else (a feeling of responsibility for a friend's well-being, the duty he feels to help his family, or a favor owed to someone else). A character's actions can often be guided by his Fellowship. WHAT IS FELLOWSHIP? Each Player Character starts with at least one Fellowship Focus. A player must select their character's initial Fellowship Focus from among the rest of the characters in the adventuring party. Each Fellowship Focus consists of two parts: • A proper noun and a narrative description: This does not have any rules effect, but is intended to offer an explanation that allows the player to work the Focus into their character's story. • A numeric value: This is the Focus' size, and determines the mechanical effects of a Focus. STARTING FELLOWSHIP Each character begins play with one moderate Focus as determined by Table 2-1: Focus Values. In addition, players may choose to add additional Fellowship Focus. Players may split their initial Focus between more than one character. TABLE 2-1: FOCUS VALUES Focus Value Strength of Bond 5 weak 10 moderate 15 strong 20 extreme FELLOWSHIP IN PLAY Before each session, the GM rolls percentile dice and compares the results to the group's current Fellowship (the table discussed in "Assembling the Group's Fellowship"). FELLOWSHIP CHECK RESULTS If the roll is greater than the party's total Fellowship, then their bonds are not affecting them - at least for now. If the roll is equal to or less than the group's total Fellowship, something related to their bonds may introduce complications during the upcoming session: - First, rolling equal to or lower than the group's Fellowship means that all characters reduce their strain threshold by 1 for the remainder of the session. In addition, the GM can determine exactly whose Focus was triggered by comparing the results of his roll to the chart. This Player Character reduces his strain threshold by 2 (instead of 1) for the remainder of the session. - Finally, if the GM triggered a Focus and the roll was doubles (an"11" or a"44" for example), the effects of triggering that Focus also double. All characters reduce their strain threshold by 2 for the remainder of the session, and the Player Character whose Focus triggered reduces his strain threshold by 4. These mechanical effects represent either internal or external pressure on the Player Characters as a result of their bond. CHANGING FELLOWSHIP Throughout the course of play, Fellowships can (and should) change. At the end of any session, a player may change the balance of their Focus, remove a Focus or add a Focus depending on the narrative of the completed session. A player's character must always have at least one other player's character in their Focus list. ASSEMBLING THE GROUP'S FELLOWSHIP Once each player in the group has picked their character's Focus, the GM assembles all of the Focuses into a single table. The table should have four columns. The first is the column that contains each Focus' value. The second column details the bond. The third column records the character to whom each Focus belongs..The fourth column should be used to label the rows based on the Focus Value in a manner that assists in rolling a d100. FELLOWSHIP CAP With extended play, Fellowship can easily top 100, which makes any Focus above 100 impossible to roll on a single d100. Here is one method to handle with this; Begin a new table with each player's character's Fellowship ranked based on their percentage of the total Focus. Include an extra Fellowship at 5% to leave some uncertainty. Then each player's character would have its own sub-table to roll on. You can continue to proceed in this fashion, creating fractal tables if the number of bonds continues to grow. FELLOWSHIP REWARDS At the end of a session where your character's Focus has been triggered, gain an extra 5 XP (if the result was doubles, gain an extra 10 XP).
  13. Tracking Party Relationships

    I have decades of GMing experience with 100+ players coming and going over that time (darn Adulting!). One of the things I have found problematic with this pattern of player longevity (or lack of it, rather) is getting player buy-in to the idea of the party as a Heroic Unit. You know what I mean; players who end up only caring about their own characters, murder-hobos, turn-coats and the like. So many times when building a new group, the intent is good, but for one reason or another, the group begins to in-fight, either passively or aggressively. Players sometimes just stop caring about the story because their PC isn't the focus at the moment, taking this as free-reign to mess with the game. Not every group is like this, but even those groups tend not to last as Real Life often takes precedence. (Yes, I understand that some of you have amazing groups, but that's not my experience.) Now, one of the tools I've used with fairly good success is a Session Zero Relationship Map. Having sat down with the players and generated plot hooks, connections between the PCs, connections to NPCs, locations and more gives the party a great starting place as a unit. However, as the sessions go on, the Relationship Map can easily get out-dated or become totally unwieldy as more and more items and relationships are added to it. Also, historical relationships often disintegrate as players forget what was created during that Session Zero. It doesn't take long, actually, depending on frequency of play, speed of play, and player drop-in/drop-out for the Map to become incoherent. Reviewing the Map every so many sessions can help keep the decay away, but it still takes up a lot of prep-time to keep it up-to-date. And the sheer number of interconnected items on these Maps can render them nigh-unreadable. As I'm getting ready to start yet another group in another new city, I've been wondering how to work with the Relationship Map this time. And then I've suddenly been reminded about the Fellowship Focus mechanic in The One Ring RPG where each player chooses one other hero to care about in the party, with mechanical benefits and penalties surrounding the focus' health and survival. Marrying this concept with the Obligation mechanic from Edge of the Empire, I've got the beginning of an idea... - Replace "Obligation" with "Fellowship Focus" - PC's must have at least 1 Focus with another party member (but never more than 1 with the same party member) - PC's may buy Focus to non-party members (NPCs, Locations, etc.) - Roll d100 as per Obligation at the beginning of every session. I'll need to write this up in more detail, but thought I'd share the germ of this idea here and get some thoughts from the community.
  14. Oh, I fully expect there to be back-and-forth between players and GM about casting Magic - and why would a player not figure out the difficulties on their own and present them to the table as part of their turn? When my players are shooting at Stormtroopers from Long Range while hiding behind cargo crates they normally figure out the base dice pool by themselves and just ask if they've missed anything (which can be answered by anyone at the table). I can't see it being any different with Magic once they get the idea what to look for. And, this back-and-forth for the Magic system is also an opportunity for shared world-building in-game as we (players and GM) figure out how the world is put together and how to take it apart again. I have some willing players lined up in the next few weeks, so I'll see how it actually plays. Modifications may be inbound afterwards. So, from what I'm seeing here, aside from using the sample magic system presented in the book, you're asking your players to track Spell Points (and then Strain if they run out) and you've introduced a Sub-Skill system. And a 5 Difficulty spell costs 5 Spell Points to cast (then 10 Strain if you've run out of Spell Points). If we look at a Characteristic=4 and a Skill/Sub-Skill=2, the caster has a Spell Point Pool of 10 to start with. Depending on your caster's Strain Threshold they could likely use that spell 3 times and then not be able to do much more casting until they can recover some points (either Strain or Spell Points)? You'll have to let us know how it works in actual play. I'm sure others on the forums would like to know, too. Aside from the mechanics of all this, I've found over several decades of being a GM that the following hold true most of the time; 1) spell lists tend to encourage players to look to their character sheets to figure out what they can do in any given situation, and 2) free-form magic systems tend to encourage players to look to the narrative to figure out what they can do in any given situation. Both are valid ways to play, and I've had fun playing/running both ways, but what I and my players are looking for from Genesys is more ways to engage with the narrative (observation #2). I just had a conversation with one of my players who was looking over my system. He wanted to make sure he understood what I was trying to get at with the system so he asked if we could walk through a sample scenario. Here's how that conversation started (paraphrased to reduce noise); Player: "My mage is locked in a cell and sees that there is a puddle reaching from my side of the bars into the hallway beyond. I'm going to try to make the puddle deep enough to swim out underneath the bars." Me: "Okay, so you're going to transform the rock underneath the puddle into more water..." Player: "What? No, I'm going to turn the surface of the puddle into a gate to gain access to the elemental plane of water! Then I don't have to worry about how deep to make it or if there's another cell beneath mine -- I'll be swimming in another dimension." Then we talked about the dice pool, but it's moments like this that I game for.
  15. It's untested so far, but yes, I have reservations about the S/SB per "Knowledge" bit - I wanted to find a way to reward XP expenditure (and "punish" lack of XP expenditure) on other Skills. Your suggestion is interesting. I'll have to try it out, too. I was hoping to this set up to balance depth of the knowledge so there's always those three dice that "slide" from Boost to Setback. Really complex Magics could conceivably require multiple skills, though, and then watch out for that dice pool! If it makes sense in your setting, I'd say sure, create a Talent (or more) that lets your caster substitute other Characteristics. I've thought about de-linking Magic anyway -- making it specific to the situation; trying to Magically Charm a crowd? Use Presence. This might even be a way to model Schools of Magic. But again, everyone's settings are going to be different and I'm only offering up a tool here.