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Crystal Geyser

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    Crystal Geyser got a reaction from Dzidas666 in The Journals of Acolyte Alvarez   
    I’ve had a number of requests to post the exploits of the Dark Heresy Campaign I ran last year. Hopefully you may find them entertaining.
     
    Acolyte Alvarez licked his aged, dry lips and adjusted the autoquill in his hand. The parchment beneath his fingers felt dry, rough. Seated across from him, lounging in the old wooden chair in the stateroom of the Nostradamus, was a young man clad in the traditional officer’s garb of the Departmento Munitorum Commissariat. His unruly black hair, however, stuck out like he’d just been hit by a stun baton, and his eyes twinkled with a kind of malicious delight. Sitting across from him gave Alvarez the sensation of standing too close to a roaring flame – a roaring flame that felt inches from reaching out and burning his soul as well as his flesh. Of course, none of this was a surprise to Alvarez – he’d been warned to expect these unnatural phenomena around the rogue psyker.
    He hadn’t been warned that there’d be three of them. Three identical copies of the same lad, seated around the table with him. He scratched down a few notes on his parchment – the slight sound of insect-like clicking as one of the boys rolled his neck, the way that their pupils expanded beyond their irisises in the low lighting, making their eyes look black as ink.
    The boy seated across from Alvarez reached down and stroked the wolf. Alvarez nearly jumped out of his seat. That wolf definitely hadn’t been there before. It bared metal fangs at him. The boy laughed. His tongue seemed far too long.
    “How did you find me?” the boy asked, grinning.
    Alvarez cleared his throat. “An anonymous order for a few hundred Munitorum-standard Commissariat issue jackets doesn’t go unnoticed, even in Inquisitorial channels. Lord Locke flagged you immediately.”
    “Ah, Locke,” the boy sighed. “I assume you’ll want an explanation?”
    “For the jackets?” Alvarez shook his head. “There are more pressing questions on my mind at the moment.”
    The boy raised his eyebrow. “Where shall I start then, old man?”
    Alvarez readied his quill. “At the beginning.”
     
    +++From the journals of Adept Konrad Alvarez, Ordo Xenos+++
     
    It was the 940.M41. The Second War for Armageddon was only a scant year away, yet the galaxy still reeled from the conflict in the Ultima Segmentum that had nearly thrown the entire Imperium into a civil war on a scale rivaling that of the Horus Heresy – the Badab War. There are those who claim that the Tyrant of Badab was defeated, and his turncoat Red Corsairs crushed – lies. It’s been little more than a year since the Wolf of Fenris was taken. Emboldened by the example of Huron Blackheart, Chaos cults rise up in droves across the Segmentum, requiring a forceful hand of intervention by the Imperial Inquisition.
     
    Turn now to the Nisroc Subsector, in the Isiah Sector of the Ultima Segmentum. Inquisitor Mathayus Penn of the Ordo Hereticus had set his sights on the small, hot mining world of Scarth. Scarth’s history was an unfortunate one – catalogued during the Great Crusade by the Adeptus Mechanicus, Scarth, an aquatic world at the time, was found to possess vast quantities of the mineral corcase aethex, an ore utilized in the production of experimental warp drives. However, thanks to the leviathan sea life and hostile weather, Mechanicus efforts to construct outposts on the world for the purposes of mining the athex failed drastically. The Mechanicus assembled an array of solar lances around the system’s sun to artificially accelerate its death, projecting bursts of heat and radiation that were intended to raise the planet’s climate just enough to become inhospitable to the life within its seas.
     
    In true Mechanicus fashion, however, the devices were forgotten and, it seems, never deactivated. These days, Scarth is a barren radioactive desert world littered with the bones of ancient beasts. The miners live in void-shielded, hermetically-sealed habs, digging away in hardsuits to get at the veins of athex running below the surface. Perhaps that’s why the psyker birth rate has skyrocketed to such a degree that the Black Ships have arranged to visit the planet for the second time this century – an unprecedented event.
     
    Penn knew the matter of extracting this many renegade psykers from such a hostile world, for the second time in a generation, would be a potentially delicate task. For this reason he recruited an acolyte cell to watch over the proceedings For the purposes of interacting with the pskers themselves, he recruited Lukas Ulrich, son of Lord Commissar Wilhelm Ulrich, and a former student of the Schola Progenium. Well, “recruited” perhaps isn’t the right word. “Blackmailed” is so tasteless, however, and it’s not like the Inquisition wouldn’t have found out about his…abilities anyway. Joining the team was the beautiful Beatrix Alexander, a noble-born lass. Apparently her father was recently murdered by a rival house – a pity. On the other side of the spectrum, the far less beautiful Althea “Thea” Mahliassan lay. Raised on the icy death world of Lydrurgea, inducted into the Imperial Guard and then discharged, Thea had been living the mercenary life for some time, and she’d earned scars to show for it. Like Ulrich, it was her other, more renegade abilities that drew Penn’s eye, and Mathayus, a self-identified Radical, saw no point in squandering her talents. Finally, rounding out the team came Quint, a iron-jacket assassin from the forges of Kazpbar IX, a dominion of the Mechanicus.
     
    The team was assembled on Kazpbar, where Penn met with them along with Mercedes Tiller, the captain of the Nostradamus, a chartered transport vessel that Penn had contracted to transport his new operatives. Introductions were awkward, to say the least, especially when Thea and Ulrich detected each others’ psionic abilities. Penn explained that their job was to watch over the tithing and ensure that it went off without difficulty.
     
    The trip to Scarth was uneventful, but the arrival was not. As one of the Nostradamus’s Arvus Lighters descended to the surface, the acolyte cell spied the crumbling, crenellated tower of a blackened void shield generator. Donning void suits, they exited the lander, and recovered the remains of a tech-priest who had evidently been working on the generator before it went down. The sudden blast of exposure to the planet’s heat and radiation had burned the priest down to the bone, melting his implants and augmentations to quicksilver. It was during this examination that gunshots sounded, and the acolytes found themselves suddenly attacked by a band of mutants! Horrible rad-filth armed with knocked-together guns and patched void-suits sprung from the sands and opened fire on the acolyte cell – however, a few well-placed headshots from Quint and Alexanders’ hunting rifles, along with some bolts of psychic flame from Ulrich and a brutal barrage of lasbolts from Thea put most of them down. The last remaining mutant turned tail and ran for it, sprinting back into the desert under the cover of night.
     
    Quint went to work using his technical expertise to repair the shield generator and the townspeople came out to greet and thank them. The cell immediately made way for the local Arbite precinct for access to a vehicle, and were able to use their Inquisitorial connections to wrangle a outrider scout vehicle out of the Arbite motor pool. The desk sergeant, a young Arbite named Novus, was very put out. Before long the cell had caught up to the mutant, who in the heat of the rising sun had nearly expired. A short interrogation later, and the mutant revealed that he and the others were members of a twist clan called the “Gold Diggers”. While the young Ulrich sniggered at the name, the cell quickly deduced the twists were camped out in the ruins of an old gold mine that had dried up decades before. When asked why he’d helped sabotage the town’s shield generator, the mutant revealed that it had been to steal parts from it to power the twist clan’s own shield.
     
    The mutant was brought back to the Arbites precinct and locked up, much to Novus’ chagrin, and the acolytes made their way to the Gold Diggers’ base of operations. Two twist guards were spotted outside – Alexander and Quint took them out at range using their precise sharpshooter training without making a sound. Ulrich ran his hands over Alexander’s body – Thea gave the teenage boy a sharp glare when his hands perhaps strayed a bit too far – and where his palms passed, her flesh and armor turned the color of the sand. Invisible to the untrained eye, the chameleon’d Alexander snuck into the mine.
     
    Alexander discovered a cavernous array of catwalks and gantries in the mine, armed by many guards, and travelled down them to the bottom. At the bottom of the cave she spotted a concealed door guarded by two more mutants, who she executed silently with her sidearm. Sneaking into the chamber beyond, she discovered a primitive shrine – a throne made of packets of some kind of green crystalline powder, upon which sat a mutant barbarian-queen. Evidently, this woman was in charge of whatever operation the twists were running. Alexander returned to report back to the cell what she had seen, and the acolyte cell decided apprehending the leader would be best done not through stealth, but brute force.
    With concealment broken, the entire acolyte cell rushed in. One of the mutant guards opened fire up with his autogun as Ulrich dodged from the cover of the catwalks. Ulrich rasied his hands at the guard and directed a mineral worm into his mind, forcing him to relive the past few seconds. As the autogun jammed, the guard twisted it in his hand over an over again, yelling swears. Meanwhile, Alexander and Thea drew their mono-swords and stormed down the gantries, hacking mutants apart while Quint brought fire support from his elevated position. It was then that Thea revealed what she referred to as her “fearful aura”.
     
    The mutants and acolytes alike were struck with a sudden blast of horror at the woman’s grey-skinned face, pallid and cruel. Ulrich, a psyker himself, kept his composure, but Alexander passed out and Quint rushed for the exit. The mutant in front of Thea promptly voided his stomach all over her, and when she stabbed him in the gut with her mono-blade, he only continued to wretch. As Quint dashed to make his escape he was cornered by none other than the ganger queen herself, clad in bones and leathers over a ratty yellow void suit. She lashed out at him with a wickedly curved hunting knife, slashing open his gut. Alexander, who by this time had regained consciousness, drew her laspistol and shot the ganger square in the eye, blinding her and knocking her out. The mine cleared, the acolyte cell returned to the town, clearing the filters on their rebreathers to keep out the stink of baking vomit. Thea strapped the ganger queen, along with as many packets of drugs from her throne as she could carry, to her tower shield for transport. On the ride back, Quint realized that he didn’t possess a micro-bead like everyone else and promptly ripped the hand vox out of the outrider.
               
    Back at town, the acolytes interrogated the mutant leader, and she revealed that she’d been running a drug ring with a local noble named Sykes. Sykes was the head of a corcase athex mining guild and also one of the town’s water farmers – his real fortune was made from sending crewed airships into the tumultuous stormy skies to harvest water from the irradiated atmosphere. Sykes had supplied her with the case, and she had dealed it. This case, a crystalline powder derived from corcase athex, could cause supernatural phenomena in the user, a high from beyond the planes. Evidently, they needed to pay this Sykes a visit.
     
    The cell travelled to his manor, after leaving the twist leader with Novus the Arbite. At the mansion, they discovered the ground and second story packed with disheveled-looking miners sleeping on cots and bedrolls. Sykes himself was nowhere to be found, but in his chambers they discovered a data-slate containing his ledgers and a journal. The slate revealed that Sykes had spent the money from the athex on beetle tents, food, security fences, and autogun turrets – evidently he was plotting to establish a fortified compound within the desrt. He journal was packed with mad scribblings, warning of a coming darkness, and that his people needed to flee lest they be taken. The portents, the cell realized, were prophecies of the coming of the Black Ship. Sykes and his miners had become renegade psykers from their exposure to corcase athex, and they were planning an exodus, funded by the distribution of a supernatural substance. This was a cult – a cult of witches. This was exactly the sort of thing that Penn had been on the watch for.
    It should be noted that while this occurred, Quint had decided to survey the area and had skirted round to the back of the building. There he had found Syke’s parked water zepelllin and, detaching its gas supply, ran a hose through a window into the manor to pump the gas into the building. The psykers began to grow woozy, and Ulrich and Thea, fearing that Quint intended to kill the psykers, ushered them out onto the lawn. There, they encountered a strange individual.
     
    A aged pale man with fiery red hair limped up to the manor but stopped at the sight of the cell. Thea and Ulrich immediately pegged him as a psyker – his aura had that distinctive feel to it. They assumed he was one of Sykes’s wards, and began to interrogate him. When the conversation grew heated, and one of them – no one remembers who – reached for a laspistol, the psyker threw up a blinding flash of light and made a run for it. Thea tackled him, and poor Red ended up strapped to Thea’s tower shield.
     
    Alvarez’s note: I later asked Lord Inquisitor Locke if I could speak to Acolyte Red about this incident, but my request was denied. Apparently his extensive injuries and cybernetic augmentations make it difficult for him to speak, and Locke tries to avoid mentioning Penn’s cell whenever possible for fear that Red will accidentally set something on fire again.
     
    The cell bungled Red into the back of the outsider vehicle and began to drive away. Quint, in a bizarre desire to “remove an evidence”, drew his laspistol and shot the house through an open window as they left. The manor, filled with gas from the zepellin, exploded. All of the psykers passed out inside, including those milling around on the lawn, died fiery deaths as their souls were delivered to the God-Emperor of Mankind for eternal judgment. Ulrich, Thea, and Alexander stared at Quint with open mouths as they realized that their one objective – ensure the tithing of psykers – had just been terminated by one of their own cell operatives.
     
    The boy grinned and chuckled, taking a glass of amasec from the table and swishing it around before taking a sip. He looked over at Alvarez. “Want one?” he asked. Alvarez nodded, and one of the lad’s doppelgangers stood and made his way to the liquor cabinet for another glass.
    “So this Quint…” Alvarez said. “He singlehandedly failed the entire mission objective?”
    “In his defense, it was an accident. He thought the psykers were clear. He likes to trust his gut instinct.”
    Alvarez laughed. “Shocking. Now I see why I’ve never come across any mention of him in any of the Inquisitorial annals.”
    “Well, actually,” the lad said, “That’s not the real reason.”
    “Oh?” Alvarez asked, accepting the drink from the boy’s clone. From the imbedded micro-auspices in his palms he ran a hypersonic diagnostic of its chemical composition – pure, it seemed. He drank. It was good.
    “No,” the boy said, stretching his legs out. “No, Quint was off the rails to begin with, but he got a lot worse later on – well, you’ll see why we had to put him down.”
    “You killed him?” Alvarez asked.
    The boy nodded.
    “But…” Alvarez frowned. “I thought you said he likes to trust his gut.”
    “Oh, he does.” The boy finished his drink and put it down on the table. The wolf growled, and he reached a hand down to stroke the animal’s neck. “Death didn’t really stick to him.”
     
    I hope you enjoyed the beginnings of the antics of Lukas, Thea, Beatrix and Quint. I intend to post the full campaign, most likely one "session's" worth of archives per week, so be sure to tune in!
  2. Like
    Crystal Geyser got a reaction from Gamiel in Xenos Empire Generator   
    THE AELANTI
     
    Size: One System
    Number of Planets: Void Presence
    Outlook: Hostile to outsiders
    Allies/Partner: Rogue Traders
    Xenos Type: Deathworld Survivors
    Tech-Base: Self-Sufficient
    Goals: Expansion
    Historical Contacts: Conquest
    Void Ships: Stolen
    Government: Repressive Dictatorship
    Landing and Trade Rights: Individual Honor Challenge
    Trade Hub Goals: Maintain appearances
    Local Security: Gang thugs
     
    The Aelanti Empire comprises a single solar system within the Encarmine Sector. While they do have a number of aqua-terrene void stations scattered along the edges of the system, and occasionally make raids into outside space, the entire population remains along the rim of a single star. Every facet of the system is filled and exploited by the aquatic xenos, who have voraciously terraformed and begun to manipulate their environment.
     
    Now looking forward to the future, the Aelanti have invested in powerful void ships to defend the system and its most populous planets. While the Aelanti are incapable of building their own ships, they are more than adept at stealing those of other races. Their fleet is mismatched and of ill quality, but their boarding crews are unsurpassed and take great pleasure from combat.
     
    The Aelanti are hostile to outsiders, displaying extreme suspicion and paranoia. The Aelanti are cynical of outsiders and land walkers. Attempts to trade and negotiate with the race by other Rogue Traders in the past have been limited and regulated by provisional, and the Aelanti make a habit of thoroughly inspecting the entirety of a Rogue Trader’s vessel before allowing them access to docking equipment. Trade is conducted off world, and no non-Aelanti is allowed on the surface of any of their planets.
     
    Historically, however, the Aelanti have shown eased relations with Rogue Traders of the Serine Dynasty. Negotiations with those bearing the warrant of the Serine pass much more smoothly amongst the Aelanti, and investigators of the Odro Xenos view this dealership with increasing alarm and consternation. In reality, the Aelanti afford the Serine Dynasty such alacrity as the Aelanti have no viable warp travel technology of their own, and rely on the ships of the dynasty to help emissaries of the species move through space in order to survey undiscovered worlds ripe for terraforming and colonization.
     
    The Aelanti evolved on the aquatic death world of Korash, which has lent them a harshly predatory biology with which they have dominated their natural environment in order to develop advanced technologies. A cluster of long, spatula tentacles webbed by a membranous skirt defines the lower body of the Aelanti. The flat heads of the tentacles are marked by long fronds, which Imperial xenobiologists hypothesize may be used for filter feeding.
     
    From the waistline up, the torso of the Aelanti is roughly human, resembling the chest of an anorexic human male with distended guts and sharp, angular ribs. The back of the Aelanti is protected by a heavy armored shell, like that of a mollusk, pocked with hollow gill scoops. The shell of the Aelanti comes to a hooked crest that hangs over the head like a cowl.
     
    The Aelanti’s head resembles the trunk and maw of a blind, gnashing leech, with no eyes and multiple circular rows of sharp, serrated teeth. The head possesses a long, dangling lure that glows in low light conditions. The arms of the Aelanti resemble long, angelic wings of curling, membranous tendrils, each of which terminates in an opposable hooked talon. Aelanti come in varying shades of green, turquoise, and orange.
     
    Few Rogue Traders know of the Aelanti’s true form, however, as they always interact with human emissaries protected by their enclosed armored survival suits, with are both powerfully armed and possess onboard reserves of the fluid medium which the Aelanti require to survive. These suits are fashioned from a dark teal metal, which resembles scale mail and fragments into dangerous shrapnel when damage, and are often crafted in the shape of cephalopods or mollusks.
     
    The government of the Aelanti is directed by an authoritarian dictatorship with little to no room for dissent or secession from its people. Military units and vehicles patrol civilian territories and streets, and crime is not tolerated, and many of these soldiers and enforcers are ironically recruited from Aelanti dissidents or prisoners of war. The death penalty is commonly employed by the Aelanti King, Kalibos.
     
    This militaristic mindset has lead to the most common form of economic exchange known to the Aelanti – the trial by challenge. An individual wishing to lay claim to Aelanti goods must either defeat the Aelanti trader in a battle of arms or a fellow consumer. Many hypothesize that in reality Kalibos’s regime is declining and that these excessive blood sports serve no purpose other than to remind citizens and land walkers of his former might.
  3. Like
    Crystal Geyser got a reaction from Brote the Swed in Whats the most crazy/weird custom made weapons   
    A Pirate Prince in a Black Crusade game I was running summoned and bound a greater daemon and forced it to forge a unique weapon for him inside of his ship's Warp Drive Reactor. The weapon was a Legacy Weapon, a Greatsword crafted from slivers of metal from the hulls of each ship he had destroyed. When I rolled for the daemon to craft the weapon, I also rolled for Perils on the Warp once per Crafting Roll by the Daemon to see what special power the sword got, consulting the following chart:
     
    WARP-FORGED WEAPONS
    Sometimes, a simple daemon weapon or legacy weapon isn’t enough. The boldest of warpsmiths and hereteks may in fact decide that they must have a weapon forged within the warp itself, channel the raw firmament of that psychic dimension into the creation of their instruments of death. How this is done can vary – a pirate captain may craft a cutlass inside the warp drive reactor of his own flagship, while a Chaos Space Marine may make a pact with a daemon for a weapon crafted in the legendary Forge of Souls. Regardless of how the weapon is acquired, use the following mechanics:
     
    When crafting a Weapon, use the Crafting Guidelines in the Black Crusade Core Rulebook. The character makes skill checks until they reach the required number of Successes. These skill checks suffer a penalty or bonus equal to the weapon’s acquisition rarity (with no modifier for quantity). For every skill check, roll once for Time Interval (days, weeks, etc, as per usual). Additionally, for every time Interval, roll once on the Perils of the warp table. If the crafter survives the process, the weapon gains a corresponding trait.
     
    Additionally, all Warp-Forged Weapons gain the Tainted Quality, meaning they add their wielder’s Corruption Point Bonus to the weapon’s Damage.
     
    PERILS OF THE WARP EFFECTS
     
    01-05: The Gibbering: The weapon itself is a thing of alien geometries, its proportions and angles fading in and out of possibility while those that look upon it are drive to paranoia and insanity. Those wounded by it suffer an even worse fate. The weapon gains the Hallucinogenic (X) quality, with a value equal to the number of degrees of Success scored on the relevant crafting Test. Unlike usual, Respirators and sealed armor do not provide a bonus to the test, although Hexagrammic Wards or other items that provide bonuses against psychic mental effects do.
     
    06-09: Warp Burn: Multicolored hellfire flickers along the weapon’s edge, and ranged weapons spit forth shrieking orbs of burning warp-stuff. The Weapon gains the Flame Quality – if the weapon already possessed the Flame Quality, it now gains the Warp Weapon Quality.
     
    10-13: Psychic Concussion: The weapon releases thunderous cracks of energy when impacting against its target. The weapon gains the Concussive (X) Quality, with a value equal to the number of degrees of Success scored on the relevant crafting Test.
     
    14-18: Psy Blast: The weapon unleashes roiling waves of telekinetic force that ripple out from their target in a shockwave to strike those nearby. If the weapon is a ranged weapon, it gains the Blast (X) Quality, with a value equal to the number of degrees of Success scored on the relevant crafting Test. If the weapon already possessed the Blast Quality, increase the blast Radius by 1. If the weapon was a Melee Weapon, the wielder gains the Whirlwind of Death Talent when using the weapon – however, instead of making one attack per foe, the character makes one attack, and on a success the attack automatically hits every foe. If the wielder already possessed the Whirlwind of Death Talent, he gains a +10 when making the Whirlwind of Death maneuver with this weapon, and benefits from the previous modifications.
     
    19-24: Soul Sear: Warp Power scorches through the target’s flesh, twisting and mutating it vilely. A character wounded by this weapon suffers a number of Corruption Points equal to the damage inflicted – remember, most Minor NPCs are killed or transformed into mewling spawn by 10 Corruption Points.
     
    25-30: Locked In: The wounds inflicted by the weapon form barriers around the target’s mind, rendering them paralyzed. The weapon gains the Snare (X) Quality, with X equal to the number of degrees scored on the relevant crafting Test. Unlike usual Snare Weapons, ranged weapon does not require any special ammunition, and melee weapons also benefit from this trait. Instead of a strength test, a Willpower Test is required to escape the weapon’s paralytic effect.
     
    31-38: Chronologic Incontinence: The weapon seems to exist in all places at once, ghostly-after images of the weapon rippling through the air. Melee Weapons grant their wielder the Blademaster and Wall of Steel when using this weapon. If the character already possesses either of these talents, they get a +10 bonus to Weapon Skill Tests made with the weapon. Ranged Weapons gain the Storm and Twin-Linked Quality. If the weapon already possesses either of these quality, they get a +10 bonus to Ballistic Skill Tests made with the weapon.
     
    39-46: Psychic Mirror: The weapon’s machine-spirit is a malleable and reflective thing, and in combat it twists and morphs its shape to counter the machine-spirits of its foes, adapting itself to counter it’s user’s foes. If a Melee Weapon, the weapon gains the Defensive and Flexible Qualities. If a ranged weapon, it gains the Gyro-Stabilized Quality.
     
    47-55: Warp Whispers: People wounded by the weapon have their minds assailed by the voices of daemons, whispering terrible secrets to their victims. The weapon gains the Mind Eater Daemon Weapon Trait, although it is not a Daemon Weapon.
     
    56-58: Vice Versa: The weapon transforms in it’s wielder’s hand to reflect a weapon wielded by a foe he is directly engaged with – i.e., both character are in combat and can see each other without obscurity. The character gains a weapon with a profile equal to one weapon on his foe’s person – this weapon must be of the same type (i.e. a ranged weapon can only replicate a ranged weapon). The new weapon retains any unique abilities it previously possessed, and returns to its original form when its double has been slain.
     
    59-67: Dark Summoning. The weapon gains one trait from the Daemon Weapon Tables, rolled for randomly based on what kind of Daemon was summoned. 
     
    68-72: Rending the Veil: The character swings the weapon through the air, and every slice rips a tear in reality staring right into the heart of the warp. Whenever the character makes his or her first attack action with the weapon, the weapon grants its wielder the Fear 1 Trait, or +1 to any fear trait they already possess. If the wielder ever inflicts Zealous Hatred, the Fear level and bonus is increased by 1.
     
    73-78: Blood Rain. The weapon constantly bleeds a film of warp-tainted blood, and those wounded by it are horridly corrupted. The weapon gains the Toxic Quality, with a level equal to the number of degrees scored on the crafting check. Any Psykers wounded by the weapon’s Toxic quality automatically cause Perils of the Warp if they use Psychic powers for 1d5 rounds after being wounded, due to the warp-charged matter infecting their vital fluids.
     
    79-82: Cataclysmic Blast: This has no benefit, as rolling this effect during the crafting process would destroy the materials involved.
     
    83-86: Mass Possession: The weapon gains two traits from the Daemon Weapon Tables, rolled for randomly based on what kind of Daemon was summoned.
     
    Reality Quake: The weapon buckles reality itself, and the laws of physics are shorn apart by the sharpness of its edge. Whenever the character makes a successful attack with the weapon, it gains a randomly determined quality from the following list: Concussive, Crippling, Devastating, Flame, Hallucinogenic, Haywire, Razor Sharp, Shocking, Toxic, Warp Weapon (roll a d10 to determine which). The rating of these traits is equal to the degrees of success scored on the crafting check.
     
    Grand Possession: The weapon gains three traits from the Daemon Weapon Tables, rolled for randomly based on what kind of Daemon was summoned.
     
    Annihilation: The crafter is instantly destroyed, as are his materials. As such, this result confers no benefit.
  4. Like
    Crystal Geyser got a reaction from Talon of Anathrax in Should I warn my players?   
    I've started a new thread here: https://community.fantasyflightgames.com/topic/231600-the-journals-of-acolyte-alvarez/
     
    I've also posted the first episode here:
     
    I’ve had a number of requests to post the exploits of the Dark heresy Campaign I ran last year. Hopefully you may find them entertaining.
     
    Acolyte Alvarez licked his aged, dry lips and adjusted the autoquill in his hand. The parchment beneath his fingers felt dry, rough. Seated across from him, lounging in the old wooden chair in the stateroom of the Nostradamus, was a young man clad in the traditional officer’s garb of the Departmento Munitorum Commissariat. His unruly black hair, however, stuck out like he’d just been hit by a stun baton, but his eyes twinkled with a kind of malicious delight. Sitting across from him gave Alvarez the sensation of standing too close to a roaring flame – a roaring flame that felt inches from reaching out and burning his soul as well as his flesh. Of course, none of this was a surprise to Alvarez – he’d been warned to expect these unnatural phenomena around the rogue psyker.
    He hadn’t been warned that there’d be three of them. Three identical copies of the same lad, seated around the table with him. He scratched down a few notes on his parchment – the slight sound of insect-like clicking as one of the boys rolled his neck, the way that their pupils expanded beyond their irisises in the low lighting, making their eyes look black as ink.
    The boy seated across from Alvarez reached down and stroked the wolf. Alvarez nearly jumped out of his seat. That wolf definitely hadn’t been there before. It bared metal fangs at him. The boy laughed. His tongue seemed far too long.
    “How did you find me?” the boy asked, grinning.
    Alvarez cleared his throat. “An anonymous order for a few hundred Munitorum-standard Commissariat issue jackets doesn’t go unnoticed, even in Inquisitorial channels. Lord Locke flagged you immediately.”
    “Ah, Locke,” the boy sighed. “I assume you’ll want an explanation?”
    “For the jackets?” Alvarez shook his head. “There are more pressing questions on my mind at the moment.”
    The boy raised his eyebrow. “Where shall I start then, old man?”
    Alvarez readied his quill. “At the beginning.”
     
    +++From the journals of Adept Konrad Alvarez, Ordo Xenos+++
     
    It was the 940.M41. The Second War for Armageddon was only a scant year away, yet the galaxy still reeled from the conflict in the Ultima Segmentum that had nearly thrown the entire Imperium into a civil war on a scale rivaling that of the Horus Heresy – the Badab War. There are those who claim that the Tyrant of Badab was defeated, and his turncoat Red Corsairs crushed – lies. It’s been little more than a year since the Wolf of Fenris was taken. Emboldened by the example of Huron Blackheart, Chaos cults rise up in droves across the Segmentum, requiring a forceful hand of intervention by the Imperial Inquisition.
     
    Turn now to the Nisroc Subsector, in the Isiah Sector of the Ultima Segmentum. Inquisitor Mathayus Penn of the Ordo Hereticus had set his sights on the small, hot mining world of Scarth. Scarth’s history was an unfortunate one – catalogued during the Great Crusade by the Adeptus Mechanicus, Scarth, an aquatic world at the time, was found to possess vast quantities of the mineral corcase aethex, an ore utilized in the production of experimental warp drives. However, thanks to the leviathan sea life and hostile weather, Mechanicus efforts to construct outposts on the world for the purposes of mining the athex failed drastically. The Mechanicus constructed an array of solar lances around the system’s sun to artificially accelerate its death, projecting bursts of heat and radiation that were intended to raise the planet’s climate just enough to become inhospitable to the life within its seas.
     
    In true Mechanicus fashion, however, the devices were forgotten and, it seems, never deactivated. These days, Scarth is a barren radioactive desert world littered with the bones of ancient beasts. The miners live in void-shielded, hermetically-sealed habs, digging away in hardsuits to get at the veins of athex running below the surface. Perhaps that’s why the psyker birth rate has skyrocketed to such a degree that the Black Ships have arranged to visit the planet for the second time this century – an unprecedented event.
     
    Penn knew the matter of extracting this many renegade psykers from such a hostile world, for the second time in a generation, would be a potentially delicate task. For this reason he recruited an acolyte cell to watch over the proceedings For the purposes of interacting with the pskers themselves, he recruited Lukas Ulrich, a former student of the Schola Progenium. Well, “recruited” perhaps isn’t the right word. “Blackmailed” is so tasteless, however, and it’s not like the Inquisition wouldn’t have found out about his…abilities anyway. Joining the team was the beautiful Beatrix Alexander, a noble-born lass. Apparently her father was recently murdered by a rival house – a pity. On the other side of the spectrum, the far less beautiful Althea “Thea” Mahliassan lay. Raised on the icy death world of Lydrurgea, inducted into the Imperial Guard and then discharged, Thea had been living the mercenary life for some time, and she’d earned scars to show for it. Like Ulrich, it was her other, more renegade abilities that drew Penn’s eye, and Mathayus, a self-identified Radical, saw no point in squandering her talents. Finally, rounding out the team came Quint, a iron-jacket assassin from the forges of Kazpbar IX, a dominion of the Mechanicus.
     
    The team was assembled on Kazpbar, where Penn met with them along with Mercedes Tiller, the captain of the Nostradamus, a chartered transport vessel that Penn had contracted to transport his new operatives. Introductions were awkward, to say the least, especially when Thea and Ulrich detected each others’ psionic abilities. Penn explained that their job was to watch over the tithing and ensure that it went off without difficulty.
     
    The trip to Scarth was uneventful, but the arrival was not. As one of the Nostradamus’s Arvus Lighters descended to the surface, the acolyte cell spied the crumbling, crenellated tower of a blackened void shield generator. Donning void suits, they exited the lander, and recovered the remains of a tech-priest who had evidently bee working on the generator before it went down. The sudden blast of exposure to the planet’s heat and radiation had burned the priest down to the bone, melting his implants and augmentations to quicksilver. It was during this examination that gunshots sounded, and the acolytes found themselves suddenly attacked by a band of mutants! Horrible rad-filth armed with knocked-together guns and patched void-suits sprung from the sands and opened fire on the acolyte cell – however, a few well-placed headshots from Quint and Alexanders’ hunting rifles, along with some bolts of psychic flame from Ulrich and a brutal barrage of lasbolts from Thea put most of them down. The last remaining mutant turned tail and ran for it, sprinting back into the desert under the cover of night.
     
    Quint went to work using his technical expertise to repair the shield generator and the townspeople came out to greet and thank them. The cell immediately made way for the local Arbite precinct for access to a vehicle, and were able to use their Inquisitorial connections to wrangle a outrider scout vehicle out of the Arbite motor pool. The desk sergeant, a young Arbite named Novus, was very put out. Before long the cell had caught up to the mutant, who in the heat of the rising sun had nearly expired. A short interrogation later, and the mutant revealed that he and the others were members of a twist clan called the “Gold Diggers”. While the young Ulrich sniggered at the name, the cell quickly deduced the twists were camped out in the ruins of an old gold mine that had dried up decades before. When asked why he’d helped sabotage the town’s shield generator, the mutant revealed that it had been to steal parts from it to power the twist clan’s own shield.
     
    The mutant was brought back to the Arbites precinct and locked up, much to Novus’ chagrin, and the acolytes made their way to the Gold Diggers’ base of operations. Two twist guards were spotted outside – Alexander and Quint took them out at range using their precise sharpshooter training without making a sound. Ulrich ran his hands over Alexander’s body – Thea gave the teenage boy a sharp glare when his hands perhaps strayed a bit too far – and where his palms passed, her flesh and armor turned the color of the sand. Invisible to the untrained eye, the chameleon’ed Alexander snuck into the mine.
     
    Alexander discovered a cavernous array of catwalks and gantries in the mine, armed by many guards, and travelled down them to the bottom. At the bottom of the cave she spotted a concealed door guarded by two more mutants, who she executed silently with her sidearm. Sneaking into the chamber beyond, she discovered a primitive shrine – a throne made of packets of some kind of green crystalline powder, upon which sat a mutant barbarian-queen. Evidently, this woman was in charge of whatever operation the twists were running. Alexander returned to report back to the cell what she had seen, and the acolyte cell decided apprehending the leader would be best done not through stealth, but brute force.
    With concealment broken, the entire acolyte cell rushed in. One of the mutant guards opened fire up with his autogun as Ulrich dodged from the cover of the catwalks. Ulrich rasied his hands at the guard and directed a mineral worm into his mind, forcing him to relive the past few seconds. As the autogun jammed, the guard twisted it in his hand over an over again, yelling swears. Meanwhile, Alexander and Thea drew their mono-swords and stormed down the gantries, hacking mutants apart while Quint brought fire support from his elevated position. It was then that Thea revealed what she referred to as her “fearful aura”.
     
    The mutants and acolytes alike were struck with a sudden blast of horror at the woman’s grey-skinned face, pallid and cruel. Ulrich, a psyker himself, kept his composure, but Alexander passed out and Quint rushed for the exit. The mutant in front of Thea promptly voided his stomach all over her, and when she stabbed him in the gut with her mono-blade, he only continued to wretch. As Quint dashed to make his escape he was cornered by none other than the ganger queen herself, clad in bones and leathers over a ratty yellow void suit. She lashed out at him with a wickedly curved hunting knife, slashing open his gut. Alexander, who by this time had regained consciousness, drew her laspistol and shot the ganger square in the eye, blinding her and knocking her out. The mine cleared, the acolyte cell returned to the town, clearing the filters on their rebreathers to keep out the stink of baking vomit. Thea strapped the ganger queen, along with as many packets of drugs from her throne as she could carry, to her tower shield for transport. On the ride back, Quint realized that he didn’t possess a micro-bead like everyone else and promptly ripped the hand vox out of the outsider.
               
    Back at town, the acolytes interrogated the mutant leader, and she revealed that she’d been running a drug ring with a local noble named Sykes. Sykes was the head of a corcase athex mining guild and also one of the town’s water farmers – his real fortune was made from sending crewed airships into the tumultuous stormy skies to harvest water from the irradiated atmosphere. Sykes had supplied her with the case, and she had dealed it. This case, a crystalline powder derived from corcase athex, could cause supernatural phenomena in the user, a high from beyond the planes. Evidently, they needed to pay this Sykes a visit.
     
    The cell travelled to his manor, after leaving the twist leader with Novus the Arbite. At the mansion, they discovered the ground and second story packed with disheveled-looking miners sleeping on cots and bedrolls. Sykes himself was nowhere to be found, but in his chambers they discovered a data-slate containing his ledgers and a journal. The slate revealed that Sykes had spent the money from the athex on beetle tents, food, security fences, and autogun turrets – evidently he was plotting to establish a fortified compound within the desrt. He journal was packed with mad scribblings, warning of a coming darkness, and that his people needed to flee lest they be taken. The portents, the cell realized, were prophecies of the coming of the Black Ship. Sykes and his miners had become renegade psykers from their exposure to corcase athex, and they were planning an exodus, funded by the distribution of a supernatural substance. This was a cult – a cult of witches. This was exactly the sort of thing that Penn had been on the watch for.
    It should be noted that while this occurred, Quint had decided to survey the area and had skirted round to the back of the building. There he had found Syke’s parked water zepelllin and, detaching its gas supply, ran a hose through a window into the manor to pump the gas into the building. The psykers began to grow woozy, and Ulrich and Thea, fearing that Quint intended to kill the psykers, ushered them out onto the lawn. There, they encountered a strange individual.
     
    A aged pale man with fiery red hair limped up to the manor but stopped at the sight of the cell. Thea and Ulrich immediately pegged him as a psyker – his aura had that distinctive feel to it. They assumed he was one of Sykes’s wards, and began to interrogate him. When the conversation grew heated, and one of them – no one remembers who – reached for a laspistol, the psyker threw up a blinding flash of light and made a run for it. Thea tackled him, and poor Red ended up strapped to Thea’s tower shield.
     
    Alvarez’s note: I later asked Lord Inquisitor Locke if I could speak to Acolyte Red about this incident, but my request was denied. Apparently his extensive injuries and cybernetic augmentations make it difficult for him to speak, and Locke tries to avoid mentioning Penn’s cell whenever possible for fear that Red will accidentally set something on fire again.
     
    The cell bungled Red into the back of the outsider vehicle and began to drive away. Quint, in a bizarre desire to “remove an evidence”, drew his laspistol and shot the house through an open window as they left. The manor, filled with gas from the zepellin, exploded. All of the psykers passed out inside, including those milling around on the lawn, died fiery deaths as their souls were delivered to the God-Emperor of Mankind for eternal judgment. Ulrich, Thea, and Alexander stared at Quint with open mouths as they realized that their one objective – ensure the tithing of psykers – had just been terminated by one of their own cell operatives.
     
    The boy grinned and chuckled, taking a glass of amasec from the table and swishing it around before taking a sip. He looked over at Alvarez. “Want one?” he asked. Alvarez nodded, and one of the lad’s doppelgangers stood and made his way to the liquor cabinet for another glass.
    “So this Quint…” Alvarez said. “He singlehandedly failed the entire mission objective?”
    “In his defense, it was an accident. He thought the psykers were clear. He likes to trust his gut instinct.”
    Alvarez laughed. “Shocking. Now I see why I’ve never come across any mention of him in any of the Inquisitorial annals.”
    “Well, actually,” the lad said, “That’s not the real reason.”
    “?” Alvarez asked, accepting the drink from the boy’s clone. From the imbedded micro-auspices in his palms he ran a hypersonic diagnostic of its chemical composition – pure, it seemed. He drank. It was good.
    “No,” the boy said, stretching his legs out. “No, Quint was off the rails to begin with, but he got a lot worse later on – well, you’ll see why we had to put him down.”
    “You killed him?” Alvarez asked.
    The boy nodded.
    “But…” Alvarez frowned. “I thought you said he likes to trust his gut.”
    “Oh, he does.” The boy finished his drink and put it down on the table. The wolf growled, and he reached a hand down to stroke the animal’s neck. “Death didn’t really stick to him.”
  5. Like
    Crystal Geyser got a reaction from Talon of Anathrax in Should I warn my players?   
    You know what? You've inspired me to write down the story of the whole campaign. We finished late last year, but I'll post it in chunks, probably in a new thread. I hope you all enjoy it.
  6. Like
    Crystal Geyser got a reaction from alemander in The Journals of Acolyte Alvarez   
    I’ve had a number of requests to post the exploits of the Dark Heresy Campaign I ran last year. Hopefully you may find them entertaining.
     
    Acolyte Alvarez licked his aged, dry lips and adjusted the autoquill in his hand. The parchment beneath his fingers felt dry, rough. Seated across from him, lounging in the old wooden chair in the stateroom of the Nostradamus, was a young man clad in the traditional officer’s garb of the Departmento Munitorum Commissariat. His unruly black hair, however, stuck out like he’d just been hit by a stun baton, and his eyes twinkled with a kind of malicious delight. Sitting across from him gave Alvarez the sensation of standing too close to a roaring flame – a roaring flame that felt inches from reaching out and burning his soul as well as his flesh. Of course, none of this was a surprise to Alvarez – he’d been warned to expect these unnatural phenomena around the rogue psyker.
    He hadn’t been warned that there’d be three of them. Three identical copies of the same lad, seated around the table with him. He scratched down a few notes on his parchment – the slight sound of insect-like clicking as one of the boys rolled his neck, the way that their pupils expanded beyond their irisises in the low lighting, making their eyes look black as ink.
    The boy seated across from Alvarez reached down and stroked the wolf. Alvarez nearly jumped out of his seat. That wolf definitely hadn’t been there before. It bared metal fangs at him. The boy laughed. His tongue seemed far too long.
    “How did you find me?” the boy asked, grinning.
    Alvarez cleared his throat. “An anonymous order for a few hundred Munitorum-standard Commissariat issue jackets doesn’t go unnoticed, even in Inquisitorial channels. Lord Locke flagged you immediately.”
    “Ah, Locke,” the boy sighed. “I assume you’ll want an explanation?”
    “For the jackets?” Alvarez shook his head. “There are more pressing questions on my mind at the moment.”
    The boy raised his eyebrow. “Where shall I start then, old man?”
    Alvarez readied his quill. “At the beginning.”
     
    +++From the journals of Adept Konrad Alvarez, Ordo Xenos+++
     
    It was the 940.M41. The Second War for Armageddon was only a scant year away, yet the galaxy still reeled from the conflict in the Ultima Segmentum that had nearly thrown the entire Imperium into a civil war on a scale rivaling that of the Horus Heresy – the Badab War. There are those who claim that the Tyrant of Badab was defeated, and his turncoat Red Corsairs crushed – lies. It’s been little more than a year since the Wolf of Fenris was taken. Emboldened by the example of Huron Blackheart, Chaos cults rise up in droves across the Segmentum, requiring a forceful hand of intervention by the Imperial Inquisition.
     
    Turn now to the Nisroc Subsector, in the Isiah Sector of the Ultima Segmentum. Inquisitor Mathayus Penn of the Ordo Hereticus had set his sights on the small, hot mining world of Scarth. Scarth’s history was an unfortunate one – catalogued during the Great Crusade by the Adeptus Mechanicus, Scarth, an aquatic world at the time, was found to possess vast quantities of the mineral corcase aethex, an ore utilized in the production of experimental warp drives. However, thanks to the leviathan sea life and hostile weather, Mechanicus efforts to construct outposts on the world for the purposes of mining the athex failed drastically. The Mechanicus assembled an array of solar lances around the system’s sun to artificially accelerate its death, projecting bursts of heat and radiation that were intended to raise the planet’s climate just enough to become inhospitable to the life within its seas.
     
    In true Mechanicus fashion, however, the devices were forgotten and, it seems, never deactivated. These days, Scarth is a barren radioactive desert world littered with the bones of ancient beasts. The miners live in void-shielded, hermetically-sealed habs, digging away in hardsuits to get at the veins of athex running below the surface. Perhaps that’s why the psyker birth rate has skyrocketed to such a degree that the Black Ships have arranged to visit the planet for the second time this century – an unprecedented event.
     
    Penn knew the matter of extracting this many renegade psykers from such a hostile world, for the second time in a generation, would be a potentially delicate task. For this reason he recruited an acolyte cell to watch over the proceedings For the purposes of interacting with the pskers themselves, he recruited Lukas Ulrich, son of Lord Commissar Wilhelm Ulrich, and a former student of the Schola Progenium. Well, “recruited” perhaps isn’t the right word. “Blackmailed” is so tasteless, however, and it’s not like the Inquisition wouldn’t have found out about his…abilities anyway. Joining the team was the beautiful Beatrix Alexander, a noble-born lass. Apparently her father was recently murdered by a rival house – a pity. On the other side of the spectrum, the far less beautiful Althea “Thea” Mahliassan lay. Raised on the icy death world of Lydrurgea, inducted into the Imperial Guard and then discharged, Thea had been living the mercenary life for some time, and she’d earned scars to show for it. Like Ulrich, it was her other, more renegade abilities that drew Penn’s eye, and Mathayus, a self-identified Radical, saw no point in squandering her talents. Finally, rounding out the team came Quint, a iron-jacket assassin from the forges of Kazpbar IX, a dominion of the Mechanicus.
     
    The team was assembled on Kazpbar, where Penn met with them along with Mercedes Tiller, the captain of the Nostradamus, a chartered transport vessel that Penn had contracted to transport his new operatives. Introductions were awkward, to say the least, especially when Thea and Ulrich detected each others’ psionic abilities. Penn explained that their job was to watch over the tithing and ensure that it went off without difficulty.
     
    The trip to Scarth was uneventful, but the arrival was not. As one of the Nostradamus’s Arvus Lighters descended to the surface, the acolyte cell spied the crumbling, crenellated tower of a blackened void shield generator. Donning void suits, they exited the lander, and recovered the remains of a tech-priest who had evidently been working on the generator before it went down. The sudden blast of exposure to the planet’s heat and radiation had burned the priest down to the bone, melting his implants and augmentations to quicksilver. It was during this examination that gunshots sounded, and the acolytes found themselves suddenly attacked by a band of mutants! Horrible rad-filth armed with knocked-together guns and patched void-suits sprung from the sands and opened fire on the acolyte cell – however, a few well-placed headshots from Quint and Alexanders’ hunting rifles, along with some bolts of psychic flame from Ulrich and a brutal barrage of lasbolts from Thea put most of them down. The last remaining mutant turned tail and ran for it, sprinting back into the desert under the cover of night.
     
    Quint went to work using his technical expertise to repair the shield generator and the townspeople came out to greet and thank them. The cell immediately made way for the local Arbite precinct for access to a vehicle, and were able to use their Inquisitorial connections to wrangle a outrider scout vehicle out of the Arbite motor pool. The desk sergeant, a young Arbite named Novus, was very put out. Before long the cell had caught up to the mutant, who in the heat of the rising sun had nearly expired. A short interrogation later, and the mutant revealed that he and the others were members of a twist clan called the “Gold Diggers”. While the young Ulrich sniggered at the name, the cell quickly deduced the twists were camped out in the ruins of an old gold mine that had dried up decades before. When asked why he’d helped sabotage the town’s shield generator, the mutant revealed that it had been to steal parts from it to power the twist clan’s own shield.
     
    The mutant was brought back to the Arbites precinct and locked up, much to Novus’ chagrin, and the acolytes made their way to the Gold Diggers’ base of operations. Two twist guards were spotted outside – Alexander and Quint took them out at range using their precise sharpshooter training without making a sound. Ulrich ran his hands over Alexander’s body – Thea gave the teenage boy a sharp glare when his hands perhaps strayed a bit too far – and where his palms passed, her flesh and armor turned the color of the sand. Invisible to the untrained eye, the chameleon’d Alexander snuck into the mine.
     
    Alexander discovered a cavernous array of catwalks and gantries in the mine, armed by many guards, and travelled down them to the bottom. At the bottom of the cave she spotted a concealed door guarded by two more mutants, who she executed silently with her sidearm. Sneaking into the chamber beyond, she discovered a primitive shrine – a throne made of packets of some kind of green crystalline powder, upon which sat a mutant barbarian-queen. Evidently, this woman was in charge of whatever operation the twists were running. Alexander returned to report back to the cell what she had seen, and the acolyte cell decided apprehending the leader would be best done not through stealth, but brute force.
    With concealment broken, the entire acolyte cell rushed in. One of the mutant guards opened fire up with his autogun as Ulrich dodged from the cover of the catwalks. Ulrich rasied his hands at the guard and directed a mineral worm into his mind, forcing him to relive the past few seconds. As the autogun jammed, the guard twisted it in his hand over an over again, yelling swears. Meanwhile, Alexander and Thea drew their mono-swords and stormed down the gantries, hacking mutants apart while Quint brought fire support from his elevated position. It was then that Thea revealed what she referred to as her “fearful aura”.
     
    The mutants and acolytes alike were struck with a sudden blast of horror at the woman’s grey-skinned face, pallid and cruel. Ulrich, a psyker himself, kept his composure, but Alexander passed out and Quint rushed for the exit. The mutant in front of Thea promptly voided his stomach all over her, and when she stabbed him in the gut with her mono-blade, he only continued to wretch. As Quint dashed to make his escape he was cornered by none other than the ganger queen herself, clad in bones and leathers over a ratty yellow void suit. She lashed out at him with a wickedly curved hunting knife, slashing open his gut. Alexander, who by this time had regained consciousness, drew her laspistol and shot the ganger square in the eye, blinding her and knocking her out. The mine cleared, the acolyte cell returned to the town, clearing the filters on their rebreathers to keep out the stink of baking vomit. Thea strapped the ganger queen, along with as many packets of drugs from her throne as she could carry, to her tower shield for transport. On the ride back, Quint realized that he didn’t possess a micro-bead like everyone else and promptly ripped the hand vox out of the outrider.
               
    Back at town, the acolytes interrogated the mutant leader, and she revealed that she’d been running a drug ring with a local noble named Sykes. Sykes was the head of a corcase athex mining guild and also one of the town’s water farmers – his real fortune was made from sending crewed airships into the tumultuous stormy skies to harvest water from the irradiated atmosphere. Sykes had supplied her with the case, and she had dealed it. This case, a crystalline powder derived from corcase athex, could cause supernatural phenomena in the user, a high from beyond the planes. Evidently, they needed to pay this Sykes a visit.
     
    The cell travelled to his manor, after leaving the twist leader with Novus the Arbite. At the mansion, they discovered the ground and second story packed with disheveled-looking miners sleeping on cots and bedrolls. Sykes himself was nowhere to be found, but in his chambers they discovered a data-slate containing his ledgers and a journal. The slate revealed that Sykes had spent the money from the athex on beetle tents, food, security fences, and autogun turrets – evidently he was plotting to establish a fortified compound within the desrt. He journal was packed with mad scribblings, warning of a coming darkness, and that his people needed to flee lest they be taken. The portents, the cell realized, were prophecies of the coming of the Black Ship. Sykes and his miners had become renegade psykers from their exposure to corcase athex, and they were planning an exodus, funded by the distribution of a supernatural substance. This was a cult – a cult of witches. This was exactly the sort of thing that Penn had been on the watch for.
    It should be noted that while this occurred, Quint had decided to survey the area and had skirted round to the back of the building. There he had found Syke’s parked water zepelllin and, detaching its gas supply, ran a hose through a window into the manor to pump the gas into the building. The psykers began to grow woozy, and Ulrich and Thea, fearing that Quint intended to kill the psykers, ushered them out onto the lawn. There, they encountered a strange individual.
     
    A aged pale man with fiery red hair limped up to the manor but stopped at the sight of the cell. Thea and Ulrich immediately pegged him as a psyker – his aura had that distinctive feel to it. They assumed he was one of Sykes’s wards, and began to interrogate him. When the conversation grew heated, and one of them – no one remembers who – reached for a laspistol, the psyker threw up a blinding flash of light and made a run for it. Thea tackled him, and poor Red ended up strapped to Thea’s tower shield.
     
    Alvarez’s note: I later asked Lord Inquisitor Locke if I could speak to Acolyte Red about this incident, but my request was denied. Apparently his extensive injuries and cybernetic augmentations make it difficult for him to speak, and Locke tries to avoid mentioning Penn’s cell whenever possible for fear that Red will accidentally set something on fire again.
     
    The cell bungled Red into the back of the outsider vehicle and began to drive away. Quint, in a bizarre desire to “remove an evidence”, drew his laspistol and shot the house through an open window as they left. The manor, filled with gas from the zepellin, exploded. All of the psykers passed out inside, including those milling around on the lawn, died fiery deaths as their souls were delivered to the God-Emperor of Mankind for eternal judgment. Ulrich, Thea, and Alexander stared at Quint with open mouths as they realized that their one objective – ensure the tithing of psykers – had just been terminated by one of their own cell operatives.
     
    The boy grinned and chuckled, taking a glass of amasec from the table and swishing it around before taking a sip. He looked over at Alvarez. “Want one?” he asked. Alvarez nodded, and one of the lad’s doppelgangers stood and made his way to the liquor cabinet for another glass.
    “So this Quint…” Alvarez said. “He singlehandedly failed the entire mission objective?”
    “In his defense, it was an accident. He thought the psykers were clear. He likes to trust his gut instinct.”
    Alvarez laughed. “Shocking. Now I see why I’ve never come across any mention of him in any of the Inquisitorial annals.”
    “Well, actually,” the lad said, “That’s not the real reason.”
    “Oh?” Alvarez asked, accepting the drink from the boy’s clone. From the imbedded micro-auspices in his palms he ran a hypersonic diagnostic of its chemical composition – pure, it seemed. He drank. It was good.
    “No,” the boy said, stretching his legs out. “No, Quint was off the rails to begin with, but he got a lot worse later on – well, you’ll see why we had to put him down.”
    “You killed him?” Alvarez asked.
    The boy nodded.
    “But…” Alvarez frowned. “I thought you said he likes to trust his gut.”
    “Oh, he does.” The boy finished his drink and put it down on the table. The wolf growled, and he reached a hand down to stroke the animal’s neck. “Death didn’t really stick to him.”
     
    I hope you enjoyed the beginnings of the antics of Lukas, Thea, Beatrix and Quint. I intend to post the full campaign, most likely one "session's" worth of archives per week, so be sure to tune in!
  7. Like
    Crystal Geyser got a reaction from Rese in Rogue Trader Second Edition Rules Mod   
    Here’s a (very much) WIP series of modifications to the Rogue Trader Core Ruleset. I’m interested in what you other players and GM might have to add or comment. Hope you find it interesting!
     
    ROGUE TRADER – THE SECOND EDITION MOD
    The following rules are intended to alter and modify the basic Rogue Trader Core Rulebook to provide a more controlled and realistic game experience. Many of the changes made are done so in order to alter player progression and create a more evenly distributed power level.
     
    Character Creation
    Xenos characters may use human career paths to represent their xenos counterparts. Each Race has a certain number of Human Career Paths they may utilize, with the following titles:
    Ork: Kaptin (Rogue Trader), Nob (Arch-Militant), Tradeboy (Seneschal, requires Blood Axes or Bad Moons Klan), Pilot (Void Master)
    Kroot: Warsphere Pilot (Void Master)
    Dark Eldar: Archon (Rogue Trader), Courtesan (Seneschal), Reaver (Void Master)
    Tau: Water Caste Diplomat (Seneschal), Air Caste Pilot (Void Master)
     
    Spending Experience
    Characteristics
    At character creation, each character chooses three Characteristics to be Favored, three Characteristics to be Neutral, and three Characteristics to be Opposed. The choices made by the player ought to reflect the character’s natural strengths and weaknesses.
     
    If the character gained a bonus or a penalty to a stat from their homeworld selection or race, one of their Favored Stats must be the one enhanced by their homeworld or race, and one of their Opposed Stats must be the one penalized by their homeworld or race.
     
    One of the character’s Favored Characteristics must be chosen from their Career Path’s Rank Advance Scheme (these Stats have 100 XP as their base cost for the first advance).
     
    One of the character’s Opposed Stats must be chosen from their Career Path’s Rank Advance Scheme (these Stats have 500 XP as their base cost for the first advance).
     
    Advancing a Favored Characteristic uses the following progression scheme for each +5 points: 100/250/500/750.
     
    Advancing a Neutral Characteristic uses the following progression scheme for each +5 points: 250/500/750/1000.
     
    Advancing an Opposed Characteristic uses the following progression scheme for each +5 points: 500/750/1000/1250.
     
    Skills
     
    Skills that utilize a True Characteristic for their Skill Test cost the following: Trained=100/+10=200/+20=300.
     
    Skills that utilize a Neutral Characteristic for their Skill Test cost the following: Trained=200/+10=300/+20=500.
     
    Skills that utilize an Opposed Characteristic for their Skill Test cost the following: Trained=300/+10=500/+20=1000.
     
    Talents
    Talents are divided into two Tiers – Primary Talents, and Secondary Talents. A Primary Talent may have Skill or Characteristic requirements, but does not have another Talent as a Prerequisite. A Secondary Talent is any Talent that has another Talent as its prerequisite. For example, Swift Attack, which grants two melee attacks, would be a Primary Talent, while its successor, Lightning Attack, which grants three melee attacks, would be a Secondary Talent because it requires the character to have first purchased Swift Attack. The costs of a Talent are based on what Characteristic or Skill Prerequisite the Talent has – in the case of a Talent without a Characteristic Prerequisite, the GM should use their sound judgment.
     
    True Talents cost 200 for Primary Talents and 250 for Secondary Talents.
     
    Neutral Talents cost 250 for Primary Talents and 500 for Secondary Talents.
     
    Opposed Talents cost 500 for Primary Talents and 1000 for Secondary Talents.
     
    Profit Factor
    Acquiring Gear using Profit Factor is no longer a test-against mechanic. Instead, it is a point-buy system. When determining how many points of Profit Factor an item costs, calculate its acquisition modifier. If the item has a positive acquisition modifier, its price is considered negligible and as such is free for the characters to purchase. If its price has a negative modifier, then for every -10 penalty to the Acquisition Test, the item costs 1 point of profit factor. When calculating an item’s price, do not utilize the quantity modifiers. Items must always be purchased individually.
    For example, say a Rogue Trader wishes to acquire a Best-craftsmanship power sword. A Power Sword is Very Rare (-20), and the modifier for Best Craftsmanship is -30. As such, the item would have a total acquisition modifier of -50. Instead of making an Acquisition Test, however, the players instead spend 5 points of profit factor from their pool to acquire the sword.
    Profit Factor, for the purposes of Rogue Trader, is measured on a scale of 1 to 100. A certain reserve of profit factor is always required to help maintain the dynasty’s off-world holdings, provide food for the ship’s crew, perform regular maintenance on the character’s gear, and the like. As such, a character can only purchase an item of a certain rarity if the group possesses a high enough profit factor threshold. The thresholds are listed below.
    30PF: Scarce
    40PF: Rare
    50PF: Very Rare
    60PF: Extremely Rare
    70 PF: Near Unique
    80 PF: Unique
    For example, if this Rogue Trader wished to purchase his Power Sword for 5 profit factor, he would need at least 50 profit factor due to the Rarity of the item. Selling an item only redeems ½ of its profit factor value.
    A starship hull costs a number of Profit Factor equal to the hull’s ship points. Any star ship component that costs ship points costs that many point of profit factor. However, selling a starship only redeems 1/10 of this amount.
     
    Crafting Items
    Alternatively, if a player wished, they can acquire the components to craft an item themselves for one point cheaper than it would cost to purchase the item. The item takes one week to craft for every point of profit factor that it would have cost had the components not been purchased separately. At the end of each week, have the crafting character make a relevant skill test. A successful skill tests indicates that the week’s effort improves the time, whereas a failed test adds another week to the total crafting time.
     
    Corruption and Insanity
    Corruption Points: Accumulated Corruption draws the soul of the character further and further away from the grace of the Emperor, opening their spirit to the invitations of malefic daemons. As the character falls further into debasement, the Emperor will turn away his patronage from the character until the character can no longer call upon his blessing.
    In addition to the usual rules for Corruption Points, namely Mutations and Malignancies, whenever a player wishes to spend or burn a Fate Point, the character rolls against their current number of Corruption Points (trying to roll ABOVE the number of corruption points they currently possess). If they pass the test, the effect of the spent or burnt fate point occurs as normal – if they fail, the effect of the fate point does not occur, but the fate point itself is still lost, either temporarily or permanently.
    Additionally, when making a Willpower Test to resist the influences of a creature with the Daemonic Trait (such as seduction by a Slaaneshi Daemon or possession by an Unclean Spirit), the character suffers a penalty equal to his current Corruption Point total.
    Insanity Points: Insanity Points drive the character further and further from his grasp on sanity. All Intelligence, Perception, Willpower and Felloswhip Tests suffer a -10 Penalty for every Degree of Madness a character possesses past the first, in addition to any other penalties from Mental Traumas and Disorders. 
  8. Like
    Crystal Geyser got a reaction from Decessor in The Tau Pirate Prince   
    Hey all, just a quick question for you Tau aficionados out there...
    For a while now we've been playing a campaign of Rogue Trader, and the party's Rogue Trader is... Well, a Tau. Essentially, the character's backstory is that the Tau was a half-breed son of an ethereal and an earth caste laborer, and given the Taus strict policy in intermingling blood his earth caste mother, the leader of a Tau mining colony, decided it would be better to sell him off rather than try and raise him as a half-blood in Tau society where at best he would be a social untouchable or at worst killed (the player doesn't actually know that he is half-ethereal so I'm hoping he doesn't end up reading this, as spoilers abound - as it is he doesn't know why he was sold as an infant).
    Thus, the Tau infant was adopted by a Rogue Trader named Graxis McAllister and given the name Galley Shay. Raised in the decadent lifestyle of a hedonistic pirate, Shay eventually went on to command his own ship and crew. After discovering the science of transgenic grafting, the ship's crew started to augment themselves with xenos body parts but doing so began to drive them insane. To save their minds they dedicated themselves to chaos (as Black Crusade characters don't track insanity, and their Seneschal was at a whopping 96 insanity points from something like seventeen alien surgeries).
    So our Tau Rogue Trader (who now has a human stomach, ork fungus blood, and simulacrum hands) has decided it makes the most sense to align himself to Slaanesh given his love of rum, money, and charismatic persona (their home world of operations is covered with statues of him, and his ethereal genes make him well-disposed to leadership). I'm just interested as to how people would interpret a Tau dedicating himself to Slaanesh, and how that would work mechanically. In Rogue Trader it says Tau don't gain malignancies or mutations from corruption, but they still become unplayable at 100 CP, which implies they can turn to chaos, even if it's very rare. Normally Tau are predisposed against Chaos due to their culture and the attitude of the greater good, but given that Shay was raised outside of tau society those restrictions shouldn't apply to him. So far, we've been mechanically representing his corruption and infamy the same way as a normal human heretic - currently he has twenty something corruption points, with the Infernal Will and Warp Saturated mutations (meaning that he is literally leaking rum from his pores).
    If anyone is interested in ways to represent Tau corruption, post!
  9. Like
    Crystal Geyser got a reaction from Talon of Anathrax in Should I warn my players?   
    If people were interested, I could post the results of their future game sessions in a similar format?
  10. Like
    Crystal Geyser got a reaction from Talon of Anathrax in Should I warn my players?   
    As Quint’s soul disengaged from his body he blindly called out to someone, anyone, for help. He had never believed the Mechanicus drivel about an all-powerful Machine God, preferring to put his faith in true science. However, as his soul made the transition into the swirling hell-stuff of the warp, he found himself in his mind’s eye back on his home world. Waiting for him was an elderly, well-dressed and bearded man, reminiscent of the carpetbaggers of old Terra. However, something was wrong. The man’s teeth and nails were black and sharp, and his eyes were dark pits of shadow in his face. The man introduced himself as Zachariah, and offered Quint a bargain – the return of his soul to his body, for a favor later down the road. Suspicious but intrigued, Quint asked for more details, and Zachariah revealed that he possessed a long-running history with the man known as Mathayus Penn. For saving Quint’s life, Zachariah demanded that Quint later save Zachariah’s own life from Penn’s schemes, doing whatever was necessary, even if it required him to kill. Quint specified that he would not kill his fellow acolytes, or his Inquisitor, although he did not name Penn specifically. Zachariah readily agreed. Finally, Quint requested a portion of Zachariah’s otherworldly power, and a mark by which he could later contact the daemon – for, by now, Quint had realized that the entity he was talking to was an agent of the ruinous powers. Zachariah agreed, and with his blackened nails carved a sigil into the back of Quint’s right shoulder, although at the time Quint could not see what it was.
     
    Quint awoke on the floor, drenched in his own blood, but thoroughly changed. His mind felt twisted, corrupted, and his skin was marked with furrowed wrinkles and lines, as though decayed, and had taken on a strange metallic tinge. Carved into his back was a strange series of geometric marks, a tattoo of what looked like metal woven under his skin. After examining it, Quint realized what it was – the blueprint of a cortex implant, just like the ones he had used earlier to lobotomize the servitors. What could this mean? What was Zachariah’s relation to Inquisitor Penn? And how long before the other acolytes discovered his secret?
     
    If anyone is interested in the game mechanics of Quint’s dark pacts, I allowed him to return to life without having to burn a fate point, as the poor guy only has one from character creation, in return for the promise of protecting Zachariah from Penn at some later date. Additionally, Quint’s player chose to make a second dark pact that would give him the option of selecting a few additional powers, and the Forbidden Lore (Dameonology) skill, to represent further boons granted by Zachariah. In return, he would owe Zachariah more favors. For now we decided to keep it fairly vague to avoid bogging down the game too much, with the exact details to be worked out between us later. From the pact, he earned 34 Corruption Points 20+1d10+Fear4 Warp Shock, and the following malignancies: Skin Afflictions and Dark Hearted. Additionally because we are using the alternate corruption track from the Radical’s Handbook, he rolled Horror’s Companion and now counts all Fear as being one level higher – which is less than ideal given that one of his fellow acolytes already causes Fear 2!
     
     
    I hoped you enjoyed the tale of the acolyte’s endeavors. If anyone is interested in hearing more of their misadventures, I can post them here, as rest assured I have plenty of schemes in store for them now that they’ve made an ally of a daemon.
  11. Like
    Crystal Geyser got a reaction from Talon of Anathrax in Should I warn my players?   
    Thrilled by their success, Inquisitor Penn granted the acolyte cell the weekend off, with their new assignment to be issued the next Lion’s Day. The acolyte cell went on a tirade of mercenary work to make fast cash. The first job was, as usual, Quint’s. Hired by a local tech-priest to conduct a mass lobotomy and servitor conversion on fifty death row inmates, Quint’s conscience got the better of him and he ended up sparing ten of the subjects, using applied chemicals to fake their deaths. For the rest, he used the provided cortex implants to permanently lobotomize them. Then, offering the ten criminals a chance at redemption, he took them on board as his personal wards and retinue. Ulrich went to a local store to acquire gear for the new wards, while Beatrice and Thea took down a local heretek and salvaged its gun-servitor. This would prove to be the undoing of a week’s worth of stellar progress.
     
     
    Later that night, on the Raven’s Day, Quint was bent double over the servitor, replacing its damaged neurological components and salvaging its weapon systems. Finally, he connected it to his data slate and attempt to subvert its programming, deactivating its security settings. The hack failed horribly. The servitor, now fully repaired, kick-started on hostile mode on the operating table and released a full magazine of twin-linked autgoun rounds into Quint’s gut, spewing gore across the laboratory and sending him keeling to the ground. Ulrich destroyed the servitor with a blast of fire, but the damage had been done. Quint was clearly very, very, dead.
  12. Like
    Crystal Geyser got a reaction from Talon of Anathrax in Should I warn my players?   
    As the week progressed, Beatrice and Ulrich infiltrated the governor’s palace, Ulrich using his chameleonic abilities and a newly acquired vox-bug to track the governor’s conversations. Eventually they confronted the governor and demanded he reveal his motives – why hadn’t he been paying his tithes? The governor revealed that in fact, he had been paying them from a number of blind accounts, and that he had only circumvented the usual channels to draw the attention of the Inquisition itself. The governor pointed out that, weeks before, a large projectile fired from the hive’s surface had damaged a docked trading ship, and that for some reason the ship was refusing to allow anyone aboard to help with repairs. Suspicious, the governor had tried to commandeer the ship for an Arbites investigation, but that too was blocked by the ship’s contraction to a Rogue Trader’s Imperial Warrant. Thus, the only authorities with the power to investigate were the Inquisition, and none of his direct calls for aid had been answered. Thus, he had taken to forgery to grab their attention.
     
    The acolytes believed the governor, and informed him of what they had seen aboard House Thix’s ship. The governor explained that, with evidence he could bring an investigation to bear against them, but that acquiring such evidence would be near impossible – especially if the acolytes did not want to make an enemy. Inquisitor Penn warned them that he had no intention of becoming the foe of a Rouge Trader with fleets at his command, so the acolytes would need to use stealth to accomplish their aims, and ensure that the retrieval of said evidence couldn’t be traced back to them.
  13. Like
    Crystal Geyser got a reaction from Talon of Anathrax in Should I warn my players?   
    After interrogating one of the ship’s guards, Quint and Ulrich learned that, while the ship had been docked and unloading its cargo, some sort of projectile fired from the hive itself had impacted with the docks and damaged their craft, rupturing the ship’s warp drive. To prevent the bleedoff of warp-matter from being detected by the dock scanners, the ship’s command staff had opted to vent the reality-bending waste into the concealed bays, where the layers of electronic screening would hide it. However, this had the unfortunate side effect of corrupting the beasts horribly, transforming them into foul mutants.
     
    As the two acolytes retreated from the ship, Thea and Beatrice inquired about the docks themselves. The chief Arbites captain on duty, Leonidas, only informed them that the docks had suffered a mechanical failure. When asked whether the damaged ship had been offered any aid, Leonidas explained that House Thix was subcontracted to the Imperial Warrant of a Rogue Trader, placing them outside the jurisdiction of the Adpetus Arbites and therefore able to refuse their attempts to board the craft. Clearly, there was something that House Thix didn’t want them to find, and Quint and Ulrich had already found it.
     
    The cell made plans to infiltrate the governor’s palace using Beatrice’s noble connections to get her a job in his financial office, where she would be able to potentially access his records and find out where the hidden money had gone. She interviewed well and was given the job, due to start on Lion’s Day. That weekend, while Beatrice prepared, Quint and Thea went into the underhive searching for mercenary work. They were quickly hired – a mysterious new biker gang of pollution-mutants had been tearing across the underhive, laying waste to the holdouts of other gangs and scavenging all of their supplies, leaving few survivors. Despite the frightening tales of an enormous mutant raider leading the group, all four acolytes decided to pitch in to earn some extra thrones and helped fortify the warehouse of Langshatt, a local gang queen who was next on the biker’s tour of destruction.
     
     
    The battle was fierce, and Quint himself nearly died of a close-quarters shotgun blast, and would then have been killed by shrapnel from his assailant’s ammunition cooking off had Beatrice not rescued him at the last second. As Ulrich threw deadly firebolts into the oncoming ranks of motorcycles, Thea hefted her tower shield and engaged the enemy leader. It took a tough fight to down the massive brute, and when they removed his scavenged helm they were rewarded with a very strange sight indeed. Flesh of putrid green, beady red eyes, and a maw of sharpened tusks – what kind of mutant was this? Unfazed, Thea mounted his bright red warbike, claiming it as a prize of war. Ulrich and Quint interrogated a survivor and obtained the coordinates of the gang’s base of operations.
  14. Like
    Crystal Geyser got a reaction from Talon of Anathrax in Should I warn my players?   
    While the other acolytes strategized over their next move, Quint went looking for more odd jobs with which to line his pockets with thrones. At an underhive bar, a mutant, who desired his technical expertise, approached him saying she was in need of an engineer. Intrigued, he followed the mutant and discovered an enormous den of mutant scum, who had been hard at work constructing some sort of improvised rocket ship. The bright red abomination of metal could not be completed, the mutants explained, as their leader had disappeared on the last raid to get supplies. The plot of the mutants was to use the rocket to reach the orbital docks, from where they would commandeer a ship and dive into unexplored space, seeking a haven from the spiteful Imperium. They had actually made a previous attempt at this a few weeks before, but the rocket had crashed into the hive’s orbital docks due to its malfunctioning piloting system, killing everyone aboard.
     
    The other acolytes, having decided to investigate the coordinates provided to them by the survivor of the biker attack, soon arrived at the same compound, and a terrible realization was made – the acolytes themselves had killed these mutants’ leader, and now they asking Quint to finish what he had started. While Quint patched up the rocket using his forge worlder’s experience, Thea rode into the compound atop the slain warlord’s bike. With Quint’s promises that the rocket would fly better than ever, and Thea’s dominance over their former leader, the mutant gang agreed to work with the acolyte cell for the time being. After all, their “Boss” had always espoused a philosophy of survival of the fittest and the rule of the strongest, who in this case was clearly Thea. Unbeknownst to the mutants, Quint installed a cogitator system in the rocket that enabled it to be remotely piloted from his data-slate, ensuring that the mutants would go nowhere without his say-so.
  15. Like
    Crystal Geyser got a reaction from Talon of Anathrax in Should I warn my players?   
    So I've been thinking about the progression from the failed ship boarding, to the penal legion. Here's the current plot that I've come up with (a work in progress) - let me know what you guys think or if you can see any fallacies or logical issues with this chain of events.
    Presuming that their attempt to take the Prophet (House Thix's Merchant Trader) fails, the acolytes are taken into the custody of the Adeptus Arbites. If they attempt to contact their Inquisitor for an easy get-out-of-jail free, the Inquistor tells them that House Thix is subcontracted under the Warrant of Trade of a notable Rogue Trader dynasty, meaning that their activities are outside of the Inquistion's jurisdiction and also that, in attacking them, the Inquisitor could make am powerful political enemy if he took responsibility for the acolytes. The acolytes (who consist of two renegade psykers, a heretek, and a noble born assassin) are given the choice of firing squad/public incineration or, alternatively, indictment into the penal legion. Assuming they choose the latter, the characters are fitted with explosive collars, outfitted with guard flak armor, a Lasgun, and a knife, and herded onto the Naval frigate Gloria Regis for redistribution to the feudal world of H63Gamma.
    Upon arriving at H63Gamma the penal legion learns they will be reinforcing the Khorschev 837 Line Infantry. The Khorschev and Penal Legion are embroiled in a war against the local residents of H63G. Centuries ago, a a relatively small space hulk emerged from warspace within the planet's gravity field and crashed, and the survivors of the wrecked ships have converted them into enormous castles that act as holdings for petty warlords. The locals refuse to submit to the will of the Imperial Creed, believing the strange men from the sky to be daemons, and to make matters worse pockets of feral orks infest the planet's swamps and jungles. Exterminatus would be the usual solution, but the local monarch's personal fiefdom is inside the wreckage of a Secutor Class Explorator vessel, and the Adeptus Mechanicus will not dispatch the necessary material for a virus bombing until the archeotech relics inside are retrieved safely.
    If that wasn't enough, turns out the locals are only half wrong about the invaders being monstrous in origin. A broods of genestealer that had been lying dormant when the spaceship crashed has been awoken by orbital macro cannon shelling, and established a cult within the local elements of the penal legion. As such, the acolytes won't know who to trust, as even the higher level captains and commissars could be infected.
    The goal of this scenario is to challenge my players to find new solutions to problems but also reward them. Often times they find themselves aggressively looting and selling off the gear of the people they steal from, and the Psyker uses his "déjà vu" power to vastly inflate the change he is offered. Because the imperial guard only has a black market that is heavily scrutinIzed, looting could be very dagmngerous and will take coordination. Also, having the genestealer cult infiltrate the higher levels of regimental command prevents the acolytes from running to higher ups to solve their problems. The acolyte cell is also partial to drinking and whoring whenever they have the opportunity - it would be very unfortunate if they find themselves infected with Genestealer DNA. Finally, hinging the war in retrieving archeotech relics stops the issue of a "just blow them up" approach, and if the acolytes do end up destroying the relics, the Navy can issue an Extermnatus.
    I don't want to stymie the players too much without offering some strong rewards however. Retrieving the relics should earn them not only some nifty loot but also perhaps the Good Reputation (Adeptus Mechanicus) Talent, along with promotions that could potentially get them released from the regiment. I'm not sure whether to try and bring some sort of Chaos influence into the scenario, given that it takes place in the ruins of a space hulk, but having two xenos presences and heretics is quite a lot already.
    So what do people think! If any of this seems illogical let me know, and additionally if anyone has any fun ideas for enlcunters, sub-plots, or loot (specifically archeotech relics with unique abilities, not necessarily just weapons) then post em here!
  16. Like
    Crystal Geyser got a reaction from Talon of Anathrax in Villains in Pursuit of a Daemonic AI?   
    I’m currently running a Dark heresy game with a band of radical acolytes. Their Inquisitor, unbeknownst to the acolytes, is a Phaenonite working on constructing a part-daemon, part-AI device capable of calculating the true names of Daemons upon entering real-space so that they can be bound and banished (or potentially forced to serve as Daemonhosts or somehow aid other Imperial interests). To contact his acolytes, he uses his Interrogator to pose as their inquisitor and deliver messages.
     
    However, unbeknownst to their Inquisitor, their Interrogator is acting as a double agent for Chaos, and is looking for a way to smuggle the device to Chaos Forces for profit and power. Additionally, the Phaenonite Inquisitor’s rival, an Ocularian, has discovered their Inquisitor’s plan and is trying to expose him.
     
    I have two questions for yall:
     
    Question 1: What kind of ratio of plot to side adventures should there be? I feel for the sake of variety, it may be a good idea to interject missions unrelated to it to give them some breathing room.
     
    Question 2: Which Chaos Faction should be the most present to the Acolytes? Because it helps to have more frontline antagonists, I was wondering which Chaos Factions would have an interest in acquiring this device from their Interrogator. So far I’ve thought of the following ideas:
     
    Traitor Guard – perhaps a section of Imperial Guardsmen have turned against the Imperium and are desperately trying to sequester the device as a way of reinforcing their diminished numbers?
     
    Chaos Space Marines – any number of Chaos Legions could potentially want this device, but I was thinking that the Word Bearers and Iron Warriors would potentially have the most to gain from it – Word Bearers due to their reverence of daemons and reliance on them as auxiliaries, and the Iron Warriors for the Silica Animus component plus their fetish for daemon engines.
     
    Rival Daemons – Perhaps a Daemon Prince or Herald wants the device so that it can use it against one of its Daemonic Rivals? This could be interesting as it would mean the Daemon would actually be aiding the acolytes, trying to help them assemble the device without risking it being used on them.
     
    Which options do you think work the best – if none of these make much sense, what do you think could be useful?
  17. Like
    Crystal Geyser got a reaction from Magnus Grendel in The Tau Pirate Prince   
    Hey all, just a quick question for you Tau aficionados out there...
    For a while now we've been playing a campaign of Rogue Trader, and the party's Rogue Trader is... Well, a Tau. Essentially, the character's backstory is that the Tau was a half-breed son of an ethereal and an earth caste laborer, and given the Taus strict policy in intermingling blood his earth caste mother, the leader of a Tau mining colony, decided it would be better to sell him off rather than try and raise him as a half-blood in Tau society where at best he would be a social untouchable or at worst killed (the player doesn't actually know that he is half-ethereal so I'm hoping he doesn't end up reading this, as spoilers abound - as it is he doesn't know why he was sold as an infant).
    Thus, the Tau infant was adopted by a Rogue Trader named Graxis McAllister and given the name Galley Shay. Raised in the decadent lifestyle of a hedonistic pirate, Shay eventually went on to command his own ship and crew. After discovering the science of transgenic grafting, the ship's crew started to augment themselves with xenos body parts but doing so began to drive them insane. To save their minds they dedicated themselves to chaos (as Black Crusade characters don't track insanity, and their Seneschal was at a whopping 96 insanity points from something like seventeen alien surgeries).
    So our Tau Rogue Trader (who now has a human stomach, ork fungus blood, and simulacrum hands) has decided it makes the most sense to align himself to Slaanesh given his love of rum, money, and charismatic persona (their home world of operations is covered with statues of him, and his ethereal genes make him well-disposed to leadership). I'm just interested as to how people would interpret a Tau dedicating himself to Slaanesh, and how that would work mechanically. In Rogue Trader it says Tau don't gain malignancies or mutations from corruption, but they still become unplayable at 100 CP, which implies they can turn to chaos, even if it's very rare. Normally Tau are predisposed against Chaos due to their culture and the attitude of the greater good, but given that Shay was raised outside of tau society those restrictions shouldn't apply to him. So far, we've been mechanically representing his corruption and infamy the same way as a normal human heretic - currently he has twenty something corruption points, with the Infernal Will and Warp Saturated mutations (meaning that he is literally leaking rum from his pores).
    If anyone is interested in ways to represent Tau corruption, post!
  18. Like
    Crystal Geyser got a reaction from Angel of Death in Should I warn my players?   
    If people were interested, I could post the results of their future game sessions in a similar format?
  19. Like
    Crystal Geyser got a reaction from InquisitorAlexel in Should I warn my players?   
    If people were interested, I could post the results of their future game sessions in a similar format?
  20. Like
    Crystal Geyser got a reaction from Rese in Villains in Pursuit of a Daemonic AI?   
    I’m currently running a Dark heresy game with a band of radical acolytes. Their Inquisitor, unbeknownst to the acolytes, is a Phaenonite working on constructing a part-daemon, part-AI device capable of calculating the true names of Daemons upon entering real-space so that they can be bound and banished (or potentially forced to serve as Daemonhosts or somehow aid other Imperial interests). To contact his acolytes, he uses his Interrogator to pose as their inquisitor and deliver messages.
     
    However, unbeknownst to their Inquisitor, their Interrogator is acting as a double agent for Chaos, and is looking for a way to smuggle the device to Chaos Forces for profit and power. Additionally, the Phaenonite Inquisitor’s rival, an Ocularian, has discovered their Inquisitor’s plan and is trying to expose him.
     
    I have two questions for yall:
     
    Question 1: What kind of ratio of plot to side adventures should there be? I feel for the sake of variety, it may be a good idea to interject missions unrelated to it to give them some breathing room.
     
    Question 2: Which Chaos Faction should be the most present to the Acolytes? Because it helps to have more frontline antagonists, I was wondering which Chaos Factions would have an interest in acquiring this device from their Interrogator. So far I’ve thought of the following ideas:
     
    Traitor Guard – perhaps a section of Imperial Guardsmen have turned against the Imperium and are desperately trying to sequester the device as a way of reinforcing their diminished numbers?
     
    Chaos Space Marines – any number of Chaos Legions could potentially want this device, but I was thinking that the Word Bearers and Iron Warriors would potentially have the most to gain from it – Word Bearers due to their reverence of daemons and reliance on them as auxiliaries, and the Iron Warriors for the Silica Animus component plus their fetish for daemon engines.
     
    Rival Daemons – Perhaps a Daemon Prince or Herald wants the device so that it can use it against one of its Daemonic Rivals? This could be interesting as it would mean the Daemon would actually be aiding the acolytes, trying to help them assemble the device without risking it being used on them.
     
    Which options do you think work the best – if none of these make much sense, what do you think could be useful?
  21. Like
    Crystal Geyser got a reaction from Egyptoid in HELLWHEAT!   
    Dear Gods of Chaos.
  22. Like
    Crystal Geyser got a reaction from Talon of Anathrax in Statting Abaddon (and other notable characters)   
    Consider it a beta-testing experiment: I am currently attempting to generate statistics for Abaddon and other notable characters from the 40k universe. I'm looking for feedback, ideas, and ways to make the NPC profile as accurate as possible. Here is my starting rough draft:
     
    ABADDON THE DESPOILER
    WS 89
    BS 54
    S (14) 86
    T (10) 65
    Ag 52
    Int 79
    Per 54
    WP (10) 97
    Fel (8) 74
    Inf 150
    Infamy Points: 15
    Movement: 5/10/15/30
    Wounds: 60
    Skills: Athletics, Awareness +20, Charm +30, Command +30, Commerce, Common Lore (Imperium, Imperial Guard, Imperial Navy), Common Lore (War)+30, Deceive +30, Forbidden Lore (Adeptus Astartes, Demonology, Heresy, Horus Heresy and the Long War, Warp) +30, Inquiry +20, Interrogation, Intimidate +30, Linguistics (High Gothic, Low Gothic, Astartes Ciphers, Black Legion Ciphers, Personal Ciphers), Logic, Navigate (Surface), Operate (Surface), Operate (Voidship), Parry +30, Scholastic Lore (Heraldry, Legend, Occult, Tactica Imperialis) +30, Scrutiny, Security.
    Talents: Air of Authority, Ambidextrous, Ancient Warrior, Bastion of Iron Will, Bolter Drill, Bulging Biceps, Cold Hearted, Combat Formation, Combat Master, Counter Attack, Crippling Strike, Crushing Blow, Demagogue, Die Hard, Disarm, Disturbing Voice, Enemy (All), Excessive Wealth, Fearless, Foresight, Furious Assault, Hardy, Hammer Blow, Hatred (Imperium), Heightened Senses (All), Inspire Wrath, Into the Jaws of Hell, Iron Discipline, Iron Jaw, Jaded, Killing Strike, Lightning Attack, Legion Weapon Training, Lightning Reflexes, Mastery (Command, Tactica), Nerves of Steel, Never Die, Orthopraxy, Paranoia, Peer (Black Legion, Chaos Space Marines), Pity the Weak, Precise Blow, Radiant Presence, Resistance (All), Strong Minded, Storm of Iron, Sure Strike, Swift Attack, Takedown, Thunder Charge, True Girt, Two-Weapon Wielder (All), Unarmed Master, Unarmed Warrior, Unshakeable Will, War Cry, Whirlwind of Death, Wisdom of the Ancients.
    Traits: All Astartes Traits.
    Gifts of the Gods: Mark of Chaos Ascendant. This functions as the Mark of every Chaos God. This conveys the Heightened Senses (All), Unnatural Fellowship (2), Stuff of Nightmares, Unnatural Toughness (1), Resistance (Psychic Powers), Brutal Charge, Unnatural Strength (+2), and Unnatural Willpower (1) Traits. These effects are included in his profile.
    Weapons: Drach’Nyen, the Talon of Horus
    Drach’Nyen: 2d10+7, Pen 7, Power Field, Balanced, Felling (4), Fear +1, Force Field 90, Tearing, Proven (2), Warp Weapon, +9 Critical Damage, deals 1d10 Toughness Damage, Crippling (9).
    Drach’Nyen is a Best-Craftsmanship Legion Power Sword that is also a Daemon Weapon. It possesses every Unaligned Daemon Weapon attribute, a Binding Strength of 0, and a Willpower Characteristic of 90.
    The Talon of Horus: The Talon of Horus is a Best-Craftsmanship Legion Lightning Claw incorporating a Best-Craftsmanship twin-linked Legion Bolter. Bolter Rounds fired by the Talon of Horus count as both haywire grenades and as best-quality choke gas, in addition to being Toxic (for those of you wondering, this is how it works in the Night Lords series).
    Lightning Claw: 1d10+15, Pen 16, Power Field, Proven (4). It deals an extra point of damage for every Degree of Success on the attack roll.
    Bolter: Basic, 100m, S/4/-, 1d10+18 X, Pen 13, Toxic, Haywire, Reliable, Twin-linked.
    The Talon of Horus is also a Legacy Weapon with the Legacy of Hate, and the following Legacy Weapon Traits: Adaptable, Instinctive, Unassailable, and Unholy Union.
    Armor: Best-Craftsmanship Terminator Armor (16 all) with Chain Loingaurds, Deviotional Icongoraphy (Unaligned), and Armor of the Black Legion. It possesses a best-craftsmanship Infernal Star force field. All sub-systems are fully functional. Strength bonus included in profile.
     
    And an optional Upgrade, for the humor:
    Gear: Two best-craftmsnahip bionic arms 
  23. Like
    Crystal Geyser reacted to LanceND in Frozen Reaches - GM Resources   
    Hi all

    I am currently running The Frozen Reaches and thought I should share some resources I have made. These are to help the players and myself organise the war and hope they are of use to others.
    All links are to Skydrive and files can be download by clicking the 3-dot button on the top right of the screen.
     
     
    Battlemap (GM)
    This is a map of Damaris with a box for each area detailing its strength, AP value, special rules and units stationed there. This is so the GM can easily calculate the total strength in each area and reduce defenders strength as needed.
    This is an A3 PDF. Use your favoured PDF viewer to print it over multiple sheets of A4 to make it a usuable size. You might have to lower the print scale slightly to make it fit 2 pages.

    Battlemap (Player)
    Same as above. But with data removed so that the players can not see the "mechanics" of the war.

    Military Assets (GM)
    Excel sheet with all available assets and their stats. My players got all the NPCs plus they brought their own toops. Add in any other assets your players have plus the additional resources from their spending PF such as space mines
    Military Assets (Player)
    Same as above. But with data removed so that the players can not see the "mechanics" of the war.
  24. Like
    Crystal Geyser got a reaction from Utherix in What kind of Inquisitor would employ these acolytes?   
    So in the acolyte cell in the new campaign I'm running, we have a renegade psyker who dropped out of the schola progenium when he began to manifest his abilities, a jeretek assassin from a forge world who is at least willing to use if not obsessed with Xenos technology (especially Necrons) and a noble born assassin. I'm thinking the Inquistor must be a radical of some sort, potentially even a Phaenonite? I was considering having a Phaenonite inquisitor as the campaigns villain, perhaps the players should be his acolytes instead?
  25. Like
    Crystal Geyser got a reaction from alemander in New Daemon Vessel Talents   
    NEW DAEMON VESSEL TALENTS
    I made a selection of new Daemonic Talents for characters with the Daemon Vessel Elite Advance by taking abilities from the Dark Heresy Core Rulebook and Creatures Anathama, and adapting them for player usage. Let me know what you think! Note that the availability of these traits is dependent on the type of daemon by which the character is possessed – Daemons of Khorne, for example, would be capable of bestowing the Blood for the Blood God Daemonic Talent, but not the Deadly Allure Daemonic Talent.
     
    Blood for the Blood God (Khorne): The daemon vessel suffer no penalties from gore and blood—all critical hit effects involving gore and blood (such as requiring an Agility test not to fall over) do not apply to the daemon vessel.
    Collar of Khorne (Khorne): The daemon vessel does not suffer extra damage from the Psy Rating of a wielder of a force weapon. In addition, any Psychic Powers used against the daemon vessel have their Threshold increased by 10. The Daemon Vessel’s Daemonic trait is not ignored by force weapons unless the wielder succeeds at a Difficult (-10) Willpower Test.
    Deadly Allure (Slaanesh): Living creatures that look upon or are engaged in combat with a Daemon Vessel must succeed on a Willpower Test each Round or can only take a Half Action that Round.
    Enrapturing Warp–song (Slaanesh): The Daemon Vessel moans constantly, enrapturing all. All who hear his or her warp–song directly must succeed in an Opposed Willpower Test or become Stunned for one Round. In each Round spent Stunned whilst hearing the warp–song, a further Opposed Willpower Test must be made: failure leads to rapture and the gain of 1d5 Insanity Points. Anyone who takes appropriate precautions (such as stuffing wax in one’s ears) gains a +10 bonus to both Willpower Tests. Once a victim has been Stunned for three consecutive Rounds, he or she falls under the Daemon Vessel’s control and is now enslaved to his or her will until pulled from the brink or the Daemon Vessel is destroyed. A controlled subject gains +5 Strength and Toughness, the Awareness Skill, and the Fearless and Melee Weapon Training (Unarmed, Primitive) Talents. A controlled subject can be recovered by covering their ears or otherwise removing the sound of the warp–song. They will return to sanity in 1d5 Rounds.
    Flames of Change (Tzeentch): Any creature wounded by one of the daemon vessel’s pyromancy psychic attacks must succeed at an Ordinary (+10) Willpower Test or gain 1D5 Corruption Points.
    Fire of Tzeentch (Tzeentch): The Daemon Host is immune to Perils of the Warp.
    Fuelled By Slaughter (Khorne): Every time the Daemon Vessel kills a living creature, it heals 1d10 points of Damage.
    Furious Impact (Khorne): Instead of performing a normal charge, the Daemon Vessel may instead use Furious Impact. When using Furious Impact, the Daemon Vessel moves its normal charge distance in a straight line towards a single target. If the Daemon Vessel engages the target, that target and any targets, friend or foe, within 1 metre of the original target suffer 1d10+10 Impact Damage. The target and any other targets hit by this attack may make a Dodge Reactions as normal to avoid the damage. The Daemon Vessel does not need to roll to hit in order to use Furious Impact. Furious Impact may only be used once every other Round.
    The Hunt (any): One target of the Daemon Vessel’s choosing will be sensed by Daemon Vessel when within 20 metres of a portal (any door, archway, or other method used by people to traverse an enclosing wall). The Daemon Vessel may choose to instantaneously materialize through that portal, whether it is open or closed, and begin the hunt. Sealing a portal with pentagrammic wards will prevent any emergence of the Daemon Vessel. A Daemon Vessel may only Hunt one target at a time.
    Mask of Seduction (Slaanesh): When the daemon vessel so chooses, it masks its hideous appearance. While clothed by seductive, shifting forms, any Fear Traits gained by use of other Daemonic Talents does not apply.
    Mercifully Indistinct (any): The daemon vessel appears as an indistinct haze. Attacks against it are made with a –10 penalty unless the attacker is at point-blank range.
    Infected Wounds (Nurgle): Any limb-amputating injuries inflicted by the Daemon Vessel automatically become infected, causing death to the target if they do not receive medical attention.
    Scourge of Sensation (Slaanesh): The daemon vessel unleashes a directed flood of the most terrible visions, torments, and ecstasies. Victims standing in the direction of the daemon vessel’s attention must succeed in an Opposed Willpower Test each Round in order to act. With each failed Test, a victim gains 1d5 Insanity Points.
    Spirit Form (any): The Daemon Vessel is invisible to normal sight, although it can be seen normally via Psyniscience, and detected by devices that can register warp disturbance. Those without this ability may still sense the unclean spirit’s presence with a Difficult (-10) Awareness Test if in its immediate area. This registers as a feeling of deep unease, a sudden chill or an unaccountable foul stench.
    Warp Corrosion (any): The daemon vessel consumes its own will to melt the target. On a successful attack, the daemon vessel suffers 1d10 damage and coats the victim in seething warp-matter. In that and the next following Round, the target suffers 1d10 additional damage. Armor is reduced in value by the damage taken from Warp Corrosion until it is gone, eaten away. The victim must succeed in a Challenging (+0) Willpower Test each Round to do anything other than scream in horror and agony. The warp- matter only dissipates when the daemon vessel is exorcised or slain. The victim suffers 1d5 Corruption points every time he suffers damage from Warp Corrosion.
    Warp Stepping (any): The Daemon Vessel can teleport over short distances, and can increase that distance by consuming the souls of others. Normally, the Daemon Vessel can teleport up to 10 metres as a Half Action. The Daemon Vessel can teleport double that distance for each soul it has consumed in the past year as a Full Action. If the Daemon Vessel has consumed more than 100 souls in the past year, it can spend two Rounds in concentration (may take no other actions) and can teleport to any planet within the system. The GM and player should work together to track the number of souls consumed by the Daemon Vessel upon acquiring the Elite Advance – a Daemon Vessel counts having consumed a soul if it slays a living creature in close combat while making use of its Daemonic Presence trait.
    Virulent (Nurgle): A victim who suffers damage from the Daemon Vessel’s unarmed melee attacks must pass an Ordinary (+10) Toughness Test or contract a virulent disease (The nature of the disease is at the GM’s discretion). A diseased victim loses 1d5 points of Toughness permanently.
    Vomit (Nurgle): As a Half Action, a Daemon Vessel may vomit on any adjacent victim. It must succeed on a Ballistic Skill Test to hit its foe. The target may Dodge the spew but may not Parry it. On a successful hit, the vomit deals 1d10+5 Damage. In lieu of Critical Damage, the vomit deals 3d10 points of Toughness Damage to the victim’s Toughness Characteristic.
     
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