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Crystal Geyser

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  1. Crystal Geyser

    Anyone interested in a play-by-post game?

    With regard to any house rules/other things players should know. I'm pretty flexible on all of these if people are adamantly against any of them, but these are just rules I've tended to institute after running the system for a while. At character creation, you can assign your stats as you please, rather than having to roll across. If more than half of your stats are below average (31), you can opt to Mulligan and re-roll the whole line (the intent here is to avoid characters who are crushingly underpowered, especially given DH1's harsh start difficulty). You do have to Mulligan before you do your one permanent re-roll, however, if you choose to take that option. As for your stat numbers, I’m going honors system here with the rolls. Don’t fudge them, you only cheat yourself in the long run. If there's anything in your starting gear you don't really want, you can refund it to the armory for its full price. If you want, you can even go so far as to liquidate all your starting assets and free-buy all your gear. If you have a choice between items, feel free to refund the more expensive one. All Supplements are good to go with me, including any homeworlds, background packages, career ranks, etc, and I possess access to most of them in hardcover. That being said, it's your job to know how your special abilities work, etc if you use something from a supplement I don't possess. For leveling up, I'm very liberal with Elite Advances. If there's a skill you feel your character should have based on their backstory, or even if it's just because it's thematically fitting, I'll probably tell you to go for it.
  2. Hey all, I was wondering if anyone here would be interested in playing in a play-by-post game right here on the forum? I've recently written a fairly detailed adventure that I'd like to test out, and if people enjoy it we could even spin it out into a whole campaign. I'm a fairly experienced GM but this would be my first time Gming over a forum. The effective premise of the adventure would be that the acolytes have been tasked by their Inquisitor to infiltrate a noble gathering and plant evidence condemning one of the houses in attendance. As such, social interaction and investigation will be the primary focus of the adventure, rather than combat. I'm looking for about three to four players. If anyone is interested, comment below!
  3. Crystal Geyser

    Whats the most crazy/weird custom made weapons

    A Pirate Prince in a Black Crusade game I was running summoned and bound a greater daemon and forced it to forge a unique weapon for him inside of his ship's Warp Drive Reactor. The weapon was a Legacy Weapon, a Greatsword crafted from slivers of metal from the hulls of each ship he had destroyed. When I rolled for the daemon to craft the weapon, I also rolled for Perils on the Warp once per Crafting Roll by the Daemon to see what special power the sword got, consulting the following chart: WARP-FORGED WEAPONS Sometimes, a simple daemon weapon or legacy weapon isn’t enough. The boldest of warpsmiths and hereteks may in fact decide that they must have a weapon forged within the warp itself, channel the raw firmament of that psychic dimension into the creation of their instruments of death. How this is done can vary – a pirate captain may craft a cutlass inside the warp drive reactor of his own flagship, while a Chaos Space Marine may make a pact with a daemon for a weapon crafted in the legendary Forge of Souls. Regardless of how the weapon is acquired, use the following mechanics: When crafting a Weapon, use the Crafting Guidelines in the Black Crusade Core Rulebook. The character makes skill checks until they reach the required number of Successes. These skill checks suffer a penalty or bonus equal to the weapon’s acquisition rarity (with no modifier for quantity). For every skill check, roll once for Time Interval (days, weeks, etc, as per usual). Additionally, for every time Interval, roll once on the Perils of the warp table. If the crafter survives the process, the weapon gains a corresponding trait. Additionally, all Warp-Forged Weapons gain the Tainted Quality, meaning they add their wielder’s Corruption Point Bonus to the weapon’s Damage. PERILS OF THE WARP EFFECTS 01-05: The Gibbering: The weapon itself is a thing of alien geometries, its proportions and angles fading in and out of possibility while those that look upon it are drive to paranoia and insanity. Those wounded by it suffer an even worse fate. The weapon gains the Hallucinogenic (X) quality, with a value equal to the number of degrees of Success scored on the relevant crafting Test. Unlike usual, Respirators and sealed armor do not provide a bonus to the test, although Hexagrammic Wards or other items that provide bonuses against psychic mental effects do. 06-09: Warp Burn: Multicolored hellfire flickers along the weapon’s edge, and ranged weapons spit forth shrieking orbs of burning warp-stuff. The Weapon gains the Flame Quality – if the weapon already possessed the Flame Quality, it now gains the Warp Weapon Quality. 10-13: Psychic Concussion: The weapon releases thunderous cracks of energy when impacting against its target. The weapon gains the Concussive (X) Quality, with a value equal to the number of degrees of Success scored on the relevant crafting Test. 14-18: Psy Blast: The weapon unleashes roiling waves of telekinetic force that ripple out from their target in a shockwave to strike those nearby. If the weapon is a ranged weapon, it gains the Blast (X) Quality, with a value equal to the number of degrees of Success scored on the relevant crafting Test. If the weapon already possessed the Blast Quality, increase the blast Radius by 1. If the weapon was a Melee Weapon, the wielder gains the Whirlwind of Death Talent when using the weapon – however, instead of making one attack per foe, the character makes one attack, and on a success the attack automatically hits every foe. If the wielder already possessed the Whirlwind of Death Talent, he gains a +10 when making the Whirlwind of Death maneuver with this weapon, and benefits from the previous modifications. 19-24: Soul Sear: Warp Power scorches through the target’s flesh, twisting and mutating it vilely. A character wounded by this weapon suffers a number of Corruption Points equal to the damage inflicted – remember, most Minor NPCs are killed or transformed into mewling spawn by 10 Corruption Points. 25-30: Locked In: The wounds inflicted by the weapon form barriers around the target’s mind, rendering them paralyzed. The weapon gains the Snare (X) Quality, with X equal to the number of degrees scored on the relevant crafting Test. Unlike usual Snare Weapons, ranged weapon does not require any special ammunition, and melee weapons also benefit from this trait. Instead of a strength test, a Willpower Test is required to escape the weapon’s paralytic effect. 31-38: Chronologic Incontinence: The weapon seems to exist in all places at once, ghostly-after images of the weapon rippling through the air. Melee Weapons grant their wielder the Blademaster and Wall of Steel when using this weapon. If the character already possesses either of these talents, they get a +10 bonus to Weapon Skill Tests made with the weapon. Ranged Weapons gain the Storm and Twin-Linked Quality. If the weapon already possesses either of these quality, they get a +10 bonus to Ballistic Skill Tests made with the weapon. 39-46: Psychic Mirror: The weapon’s machine-spirit is a malleable and reflective thing, and in combat it twists and morphs its shape to counter the machine-spirits of its foes, adapting itself to counter it’s user’s foes. If a Melee Weapon, the weapon gains the Defensive and Flexible Qualities. If a ranged weapon, it gains the Gyro-Stabilized Quality. 47-55: Warp Whispers: People wounded by the weapon have their minds assailed by the voices of daemons, whispering terrible secrets to their victims. The weapon gains the Mind Eater Daemon Weapon Trait, although it is not a Daemon Weapon. 56-58: Vice Versa: The weapon transforms in it’s wielder’s hand to reflect a weapon wielded by a foe he is directly engaged with – i.e., both character are in combat and can see each other without obscurity. The character gains a weapon with a profile equal to one weapon on his foe’s person – this weapon must be of the same type (i.e. a ranged weapon can only replicate a ranged weapon). The new weapon retains any unique abilities it previously possessed, and returns to its original form when its double has been slain. 59-67: Dark Summoning. The weapon gains one trait from the Daemon Weapon Tables, rolled for randomly based on what kind of Daemon was summoned. 68-72: Rending the Veil: The character swings the weapon through the air, and every slice rips a tear in reality staring right into the heart of the warp. Whenever the character makes his or her first attack action with the weapon, the weapon grants its wielder the Fear 1 Trait, or +1 to any fear trait they already possess. If the wielder ever inflicts Zealous Hatred, the Fear level and bonus is increased by 1. 73-78: Blood Rain. The weapon constantly bleeds a film of warp-tainted blood, and those wounded by it are horridly corrupted. The weapon gains the Toxic Quality, with a level equal to the number of degrees scored on the crafting check. Any Psykers wounded by the weapon’s Toxic quality automatically cause Perils of the Warp if they use Psychic powers for 1d5 rounds after being wounded, due to the warp-charged matter infecting their vital fluids. 79-82: Cataclysmic Blast: This has no benefit, as rolling this effect during the crafting process would destroy the materials involved. 83-86: Mass Possession: The weapon gains two traits from the Daemon Weapon Tables, rolled for randomly based on what kind of Daemon was summoned. Reality Quake: The weapon buckles reality itself, and the laws of physics are shorn apart by the sharpness of its edge. Whenever the character makes a successful attack with the weapon, it gains a randomly determined quality from the following list: Concussive, Crippling, Devastating, Flame, Hallucinogenic, Haywire, Razor Sharp, Shocking, Toxic, Warp Weapon (roll a d10 to determine which). The rating of these traits is equal to the degrees of success scored on the crafting check. Grand Possession: The weapon gains three traits from the Daemon Weapon Tables, rolled for randomly based on what kind of Daemon was summoned. Annihilation: The crafter is instantly destroyed, as are his materials. As such, this result confers no benefit.
  4. Crystal Geyser

    Should I warn my players?

    Sorry it's been so long! I'm planning to have Episode 2 up this weekend.
  5. Crystal Geyser

    Should I warn my players?

    I've started a new thread here: https://community.fantasyflightgames.com/topic/231600-the-journals-of-acolyte-alvarez/ I've also posted the first episode here: I’ve had a number of requests to post the exploits of the Dark heresy Campaign I ran last year. Hopefully you may find them entertaining. Acolyte Alvarez licked his aged, dry lips and adjusted the autoquill in his hand. The parchment beneath his fingers felt dry, rough. Seated across from him, lounging in the old wooden chair in the stateroom of the Nostradamus, was a young man clad in the traditional officer’s garb of the Departmento Munitorum Commissariat. His unruly black hair, however, stuck out like he’d just been hit by a stun baton, but his eyes twinkled with a kind of malicious delight. Sitting across from him gave Alvarez the sensation of standing too close to a roaring flame – a roaring flame that felt inches from reaching out and burning his soul as well as his flesh. Of course, none of this was a surprise to Alvarez – he’d been warned to expect these unnatural phenomena around the rogue psyker. He hadn’t been warned that there’d be three of them. Three identical copies of the same lad, seated around the table with him. He scratched down a few notes on his parchment – the slight sound of insect-like clicking as one of the boys rolled his neck, the way that their pupils expanded beyond their irisises in the low lighting, making their eyes look black as ink. The boy seated across from Alvarez reached down and stroked the wolf. Alvarez nearly jumped out of his seat. That wolf definitely hadn’t been there before. It bared metal fangs at him. The boy laughed. His tongue seemed far too long. “How did you find me?” the boy asked, grinning. Alvarez cleared his throat. “An anonymous order for a few hundred Munitorum-standard Commissariat issue jackets doesn’t go unnoticed, even in Inquisitorial channels. Lord Locke flagged you immediately.” “Ah, Locke,” the boy sighed. “I assume you’ll want an explanation?” “For the jackets?” Alvarez shook his head. “There are more pressing questions on my mind at the moment.” The boy raised his eyebrow. “Where shall I start then, old man?” Alvarez readied his quill. “At the beginning.” +++From the journals of Adept Konrad Alvarez, Ordo Xenos+++ It was the 940.M41. The Second War for Armageddon was only a scant year away, yet the galaxy still reeled from the conflict in the Ultima Segmentum that had nearly thrown the entire Imperium into a civil war on a scale rivaling that of the Horus Heresy – the Badab War. There are those who claim that the Tyrant of Badab was defeated, and his turncoat Red Corsairs crushed – lies. It’s been little more than a year since the Wolf of Fenris was taken. Emboldened by the example of Huron Blackheart, Chaos cults rise up in droves across the Segmentum, requiring a forceful hand of intervention by the Imperial Inquisition. Turn now to the Nisroc Subsector, in the Isiah Sector of the Ultima Segmentum. Inquisitor Mathayus Penn of the Ordo Hereticus had set his sights on the small, hot mining world of Scarth. Scarth’s history was an unfortunate one – catalogued during the Great Crusade by the Adeptus Mechanicus, Scarth, an aquatic world at the time, was found to possess vast quantities of the mineral corcase aethex, an ore utilized in the production of experimental warp drives. However, thanks to the leviathan sea life and hostile weather, Mechanicus efforts to construct outposts on the world for the purposes of mining the athex failed drastically. The Mechanicus constructed an array of solar lances around the system’s sun to artificially accelerate its death, projecting bursts of heat and radiation that were intended to raise the planet’s climate just enough to become inhospitable to the life within its seas. In true Mechanicus fashion, however, the devices were forgotten and, it seems, never deactivated. These days, Scarth is a barren radioactive desert world littered with the bones of ancient beasts. The miners live in void-shielded, hermetically-sealed habs, digging away in hardsuits to get at the veins of athex running below the surface. Perhaps that’s why the psyker birth rate has skyrocketed to such a degree that the Black Ships have arranged to visit the planet for the second time this century – an unprecedented event. Penn knew the matter of extracting this many renegade psykers from such a hostile world, for the second time in a generation, would be a potentially delicate task. For this reason he recruited an acolyte cell to watch over the proceedings For the purposes of interacting with the pskers themselves, he recruited Lukas Ulrich, a former student of the Schola Progenium. Well, “recruited” perhaps isn’t the right word. “Blackmailed” is so tasteless, however, and it’s not like the Inquisition wouldn’t have found out about his…abilities anyway. Joining the team was the beautiful Beatrix Alexander, a noble-born lass. Apparently her father was recently murdered by a rival house – a pity. On the other side of the spectrum, the far less beautiful Althea “Thea” Mahliassan lay. Raised on the icy death world of Lydrurgea, inducted into the Imperial Guard and then discharged, Thea had been living the mercenary life for some time, and she’d earned scars to show for it. Like Ulrich, it was her other, more renegade abilities that drew Penn’s eye, and Mathayus, a self-identified Radical, saw no point in squandering her talents. Finally, rounding out the team came Quint, a iron-jacket assassin from the forges of Kazpbar IX, a dominion of the Mechanicus. The team was assembled on Kazpbar, where Penn met with them along with Mercedes Tiller, the captain of the Nostradamus, a chartered transport vessel that Penn had contracted to transport his new operatives. Introductions were awkward, to say the least, especially when Thea and Ulrich detected each others’ psionic abilities. Penn explained that their job was to watch over the tithing and ensure that it went off without difficulty. The trip to Scarth was uneventful, but the arrival was not. As one of the Nostradamus’s Arvus Lighters descended to the surface, the acolyte cell spied the crumbling, crenellated tower of a blackened void shield generator. Donning void suits, they exited the lander, and recovered the remains of a tech-priest who had evidently bee working on the generator before it went down. The sudden blast of exposure to the planet’s heat and radiation had burned the priest down to the bone, melting his implants and augmentations to quicksilver. It was during this examination that gunshots sounded, and the acolytes found themselves suddenly attacked by a band of mutants! Horrible rad-filth armed with knocked-together guns and patched void-suits sprung from the sands and opened fire on the acolyte cell – however, a few well-placed headshots from Quint and Alexanders’ hunting rifles, along with some bolts of psychic flame from Ulrich and a brutal barrage of lasbolts from Thea put most of them down. The last remaining mutant turned tail and ran for it, sprinting back into the desert under the cover of night. Quint went to work using his technical expertise to repair the shield generator and the townspeople came out to greet and thank them. The cell immediately made way for the local Arbite precinct for access to a vehicle, and were able to use their Inquisitorial connections to wrangle a outrider scout vehicle out of the Arbite motor pool. The desk sergeant, a young Arbite named Novus, was very put out. Before long the cell had caught up to the mutant, who in the heat of the rising sun had nearly expired. A short interrogation later, and the mutant revealed that he and the others were members of a twist clan called the “Gold Diggers”. While the young Ulrich sniggered at the name, the cell quickly deduced the twists were camped out in the ruins of an old gold mine that had dried up decades before. When asked why he’d helped sabotage the town’s shield generator, the mutant revealed that it had been to steal parts from it to power the twist clan’s own shield. The mutant was brought back to the Arbites precinct and locked up, much to Novus’ chagrin, and the acolytes made their way to the Gold Diggers’ base of operations. Two twist guards were spotted outside – Alexander and Quint took them out at range using their precise sharpshooter training without making a sound. Ulrich ran his hands over Alexander’s body – Thea gave the teenage boy a sharp glare when his hands perhaps strayed a bit too far – and where his palms passed, her flesh and armor turned the color of the sand. Invisible to the untrained eye, the chameleon’ed Alexander snuck into the mine. Alexander discovered a cavernous array of catwalks and gantries in the mine, armed by many guards, and travelled down them to the bottom. At the bottom of the cave she spotted a concealed door guarded by two more mutants, who she executed silently with her sidearm. Sneaking into the chamber beyond, she discovered a primitive shrine – a throne made of packets of some kind of green crystalline powder, upon which sat a mutant barbarian-queen. Evidently, this woman was in charge of whatever operation the twists were running. Alexander returned to report back to the cell what she had seen, and the acolyte cell decided apprehending the leader would be best done not through stealth, but brute force. With concealment broken, the entire acolyte cell rushed in. One of the mutant guards opened fire up with his autogun as Ulrich dodged from the cover of the catwalks. Ulrich rasied his hands at the guard and directed a mineral worm into his mind, forcing him to relive the past few seconds. As the autogun jammed, the guard twisted it in his hand over an over again, yelling swears. Meanwhile, Alexander and Thea drew their mono-swords and stormed down the gantries, hacking mutants apart while Quint brought fire support from his elevated position. It was then that Thea revealed what she referred to as her “fearful aura”. The mutants and acolytes alike were struck with a sudden blast of horror at the woman’s grey-skinned face, pallid and cruel. Ulrich, a psyker himself, kept his composure, but Alexander passed out and Quint rushed for the exit. The mutant in front of Thea promptly voided his stomach all over her, and when she stabbed him in the gut with her mono-blade, he only continued to wretch. As Quint dashed to make his escape he was cornered by none other than the ganger queen herself, clad in bones and leathers over a ratty yellow void suit. She lashed out at him with a wickedly curved hunting knife, slashing open his gut. Alexander, who by this time had regained consciousness, drew her laspistol and shot the ganger square in the eye, blinding her and knocking her out. The mine cleared, the acolyte cell returned to the town, clearing the filters on their rebreathers to keep out the stink of baking vomit. Thea strapped the ganger queen, along with as many packets of drugs from her throne as she could carry, to her tower shield for transport. On the ride back, Quint realized that he didn’t possess a micro-bead like everyone else and promptly ripped the hand vox out of the outsider. Back at town, the acolytes interrogated the mutant leader, and she revealed that she’d been running a drug ring with a local noble named Sykes. Sykes was the head of a corcase athex mining guild and also one of the town’s water farmers – his real fortune was made from sending crewed airships into the tumultuous stormy skies to harvest water from the irradiated atmosphere. Sykes had supplied her with the case, and she had dealed it. This case, a crystalline powder derived from corcase athex, could cause supernatural phenomena in the user, a high from beyond the planes. Evidently, they needed to pay this Sykes a visit. The cell travelled to his manor, after leaving the twist leader with Novus the Arbite. At the mansion, they discovered the ground and second story packed with disheveled-looking miners sleeping on cots and bedrolls. Sykes himself was nowhere to be found, but in his chambers they discovered a data-slate containing his ledgers and a journal. The slate revealed that Sykes had spent the money from the athex on beetle tents, food, security fences, and autogun turrets – evidently he was plotting to establish a fortified compound within the desrt. He journal was packed with mad scribblings, warning of a coming darkness, and that his people needed to flee lest they be taken. The portents, the cell realized, were prophecies of the coming of the Black Ship. Sykes and his miners had become renegade psykers from their exposure to corcase athex, and they were planning an exodus, funded by the distribution of a supernatural substance. This was a cult – a cult of witches. This was exactly the sort of thing that Penn had been on the watch for. It should be noted that while this occurred, Quint had decided to survey the area and had skirted round to the back of the building. There he had found Syke’s parked water zepelllin and, detaching its gas supply, ran a hose through a window into the manor to pump the gas into the building. The psykers began to grow woozy, and Ulrich and Thea, fearing that Quint intended to kill the psykers, ushered them out onto the lawn. There, they encountered a strange individual. A aged pale man with fiery red hair limped up to the manor but stopped at the sight of the cell. Thea and Ulrich immediately pegged him as a psyker – his aura had that distinctive feel to it. They assumed he was one of Sykes’s wards, and began to interrogate him. When the conversation grew heated, and one of them – no one remembers who – reached for a laspistol, the psyker threw up a blinding flash of light and made a run for it. Thea tackled him, and poor Red ended up strapped to Thea’s tower shield. Alvarez’s note: I later asked Lord Inquisitor Locke if I could speak to Acolyte Red about this incident, but my request was denied. Apparently his extensive injuries and cybernetic augmentations make it difficult for him to speak, and Locke tries to avoid mentioning Penn’s cell whenever possible for fear that Red will accidentally set something on fire again. The cell bungled Red into the back of the outsider vehicle and began to drive away. Quint, in a bizarre desire to “remove an evidence”, drew his laspistol and shot the house through an open window as they left. The manor, filled with gas from the zepellin, exploded. All of the psykers passed out inside, including those milling around on the lawn, died fiery deaths as their souls were delivered to the God-Emperor of Mankind for eternal judgment. Ulrich, Thea, and Alexander stared at Quint with open mouths as they realized that their one objective – ensure the tithing of psykers – had just been terminated by one of their own cell operatives. The boy grinned and chuckled, taking a glass of amasec from the table and swishing it around before taking a sip. He looked over at Alvarez. “Want one?” he asked. Alvarez nodded, and one of the lad’s doppelgangers stood and made his way to the liquor cabinet for another glass. “So this Quint…” Alvarez said. “He singlehandedly failed the entire mission objective?” “In his defense, it was an accident. He thought the psykers were clear. He likes to trust his gut instinct.” Alvarez laughed. “Shocking. Now I see why I’ve never come across any mention of him in any of the Inquisitorial annals.” “Well, actually,” the lad said, “That’s not the real reason.” “?” Alvarez asked, accepting the drink from the boy’s clone. From the imbedded micro-auspices in his palms he ran a hypersonic diagnostic of its chemical composition – pure, it seemed. He drank. It was good. “No,” the boy said, stretching his legs out. “No, Quint was off the rails to begin with, but he got a lot worse later on – well, you’ll see why we had to put him down.” “You killed him?” Alvarez asked. The boy nodded. “But…” Alvarez frowned. “I thought you said he likes to trust his gut.” “Oh, he does.” The boy finished his drink and put it down on the table. The wolf growled, and he reached a hand down to stroke the animal’s neck. “Death didn’t really stick to him.”
  6. I’ve had a number of requests to post the exploits of the Dark Heresy Campaign I ran last year. Hopefully you may find them entertaining. Acolyte Alvarez licked his aged, dry lips and adjusted the autoquill in his hand. The parchment beneath his fingers felt dry, rough. Seated across from him, lounging in the old wooden chair in the stateroom of the Nostradamus, was a young man clad in the traditional officer’s garb of the Departmento Munitorum Commissariat. His unruly black hair, however, stuck out like he’d just been hit by a stun baton, and his eyes twinkled with a kind of malicious delight. Sitting across from him gave Alvarez the sensation of standing too close to a roaring flame – a roaring flame that felt inches from reaching out and burning his soul as well as his flesh. Of course, none of this was a surprise to Alvarez – he’d been warned to expect these unnatural phenomena around the rogue psyker. He hadn’t been warned that there’d be three of them. Three identical copies of the same lad, seated around the table with him. He scratched down a few notes on his parchment – the slight sound of insect-like clicking as one of the boys rolled his neck, the way that their pupils expanded beyond their irisises in the low lighting, making their eyes look black as ink. The boy seated across from Alvarez reached down and stroked the wolf. Alvarez nearly jumped out of his seat. That wolf definitely hadn’t been there before. It bared metal fangs at him. The boy laughed. His tongue seemed far too long. “How did you find me?” the boy asked, grinning. Alvarez cleared his throat. “An anonymous order for a few hundred Munitorum-standard Commissariat issue jackets doesn’t go unnoticed, even in Inquisitorial channels. Lord Locke flagged you immediately.” “Ah, Locke,” the boy sighed. “I assume you’ll want an explanation?” “For the jackets?” Alvarez shook his head. “There are more pressing questions on my mind at the moment.” The boy raised his eyebrow. “Where shall I start then, old man?” Alvarez readied his quill. “At the beginning.” +++From the journals of Adept Konrad Alvarez, Ordo Xenos+++ It was the 940.M41. The Second War for Armageddon was only a scant year away, yet the galaxy still reeled from the conflict in the Ultima Segmentum that had nearly thrown the entire Imperium into a civil war on a scale rivaling that of the Horus Heresy – the Badab War. There are those who claim that the Tyrant of Badab was defeated, and his turncoat Red Corsairs crushed – lies. It’s been little more than a year since the Wolf of Fenris was taken. Emboldened by the example of Huron Blackheart, Chaos cults rise up in droves across the Segmentum, requiring a forceful hand of intervention by the Imperial Inquisition. Turn now to the Nisroc Subsector, in the Isiah Sector of the Ultima Segmentum. Inquisitor Mathayus Penn of the Ordo Hereticus had set his sights on the small, hot mining world of Scarth. Scarth’s history was an unfortunate one – catalogued during the Great Crusade by the Adeptus Mechanicus, Scarth, an aquatic world at the time, was found to possess vast quantities of the mineral corcase aethex, an ore utilized in the production of experimental warp drives. However, thanks to the leviathan sea life and hostile weather, Mechanicus efforts to construct outposts on the world for the purposes of mining the athex failed drastically. The Mechanicus assembled an array of solar lances around the system’s sun to artificially accelerate its death, projecting bursts of heat and radiation that were intended to raise the planet’s climate just enough to become inhospitable to the life within its seas. In true Mechanicus fashion, however, the devices were forgotten and, it seems, never deactivated. These days, Scarth is a barren radioactive desert world littered with the bones of ancient beasts. The miners live in void-shielded, hermetically-sealed habs, digging away in hardsuits to get at the veins of athex running below the surface. Perhaps that’s why the psyker birth rate has skyrocketed to such a degree that the Black Ships have arranged to visit the planet for the second time this century – an unprecedented event. Penn knew the matter of extracting this many renegade psykers from such a hostile world, for the second time in a generation, would be a potentially delicate task. For this reason he recruited an acolyte cell to watch over the proceedings For the purposes of interacting with the pskers themselves, he recruited Lukas Ulrich, son of Lord Commissar Wilhelm Ulrich, and a former student of the Schola Progenium. Well, “recruited” perhaps isn’t the right word. “Blackmailed” is so tasteless, however, and it’s not like the Inquisition wouldn’t have found out about his…abilities anyway. Joining the team was the beautiful Beatrix Alexander, a noble-born lass. Apparently her father was recently murdered by a rival house – a pity. On the other side of the spectrum, the far less beautiful Althea “Thea” Mahliassan lay. Raised on the icy death world of Lydrurgea, inducted into the Imperial Guard and then discharged, Thea had been living the mercenary life for some time, and she’d earned scars to show for it. Like Ulrich, it was her other, more renegade abilities that drew Penn’s eye, and Mathayus, a self-identified Radical, saw no point in squandering her talents. Finally, rounding out the team came Quint, a iron-jacket assassin from the forges of Kazpbar IX, a dominion of the Mechanicus. The team was assembled on Kazpbar, where Penn met with them along with Mercedes Tiller, the captain of the Nostradamus, a chartered transport vessel that Penn had contracted to transport his new operatives. Introductions were awkward, to say the least, especially when Thea and Ulrich detected each others’ psionic abilities. Penn explained that their job was to watch over the tithing and ensure that it went off without difficulty. The trip to Scarth was uneventful, but the arrival was not. As one of the Nostradamus’s Arvus Lighters descended to the surface, the acolyte cell spied the crumbling, crenellated tower of a blackened void shield generator. Donning void suits, they exited the lander, and recovered the remains of a tech-priest who had evidently been working on the generator before it went down. The sudden blast of exposure to the planet’s heat and radiation had burned the priest down to the bone, melting his implants and augmentations to quicksilver. It was during this examination that gunshots sounded, and the acolytes found themselves suddenly attacked by a band of mutants! Horrible rad-filth armed with knocked-together guns and patched void-suits sprung from the sands and opened fire on the acolyte cell – however, a few well-placed headshots from Quint and Alexanders’ hunting rifles, along with some bolts of psychic flame from Ulrich and a brutal barrage of lasbolts from Thea put most of them down. The last remaining mutant turned tail and ran for it, sprinting back into the desert under the cover of night. Quint went to work using his technical expertise to repair the shield generator and the townspeople came out to greet and thank them. The cell immediately made way for the local Arbite precinct for access to a vehicle, and were able to use their Inquisitorial connections to wrangle a outrider scout vehicle out of the Arbite motor pool. The desk sergeant, a young Arbite named Novus, was very put out. Before long the cell had caught up to the mutant, who in the heat of the rising sun had nearly expired. A short interrogation later, and the mutant revealed that he and the others were members of a twist clan called the “Gold Diggers”. While the young Ulrich sniggered at the name, the cell quickly deduced the twists were camped out in the ruins of an old gold mine that had dried up decades before. When asked why he’d helped sabotage the town’s shield generator, the mutant revealed that it had been to steal parts from it to power the twist clan’s own shield. The mutant was brought back to the Arbites precinct and locked up, much to Novus’ chagrin, and the acolytes made their way to the Gold Diggers’ base of operations. Two twist guards were spotted outside – Alexander and Quint took them out at range using their precise sharpshooter training without making a sound. Ulrich ran his hands over Alexander’s body – Thea gave the teenage boy a sharp glare when his hands perhaps strayed a bit too far – and where his palms passed, her flesh and armor turned the color of the sand. Invisible to the untrained eye, the chameleon’d Alexander snuck into the mine. Alexander discovered a cavernous array of catwalks and gantries in the mine, armed by many guards, and travelled down them to the bottom. At the bottom of the cave she spotted a concealed door guarded by two more mutants, who she executed silently with her sidearm. Sneaking into the chamber beyond, she discovered a primitive shrine – a throne made of packets of some kind of green crystalline powder, upon which sat a mutant barbarian-queen. Evidently, this woman was in charge of whatever operation the twists were running. Alexander returned to report back to the cell what she had seen, and the acolyte cell decided apprehending the leader would be best done not through stealth, but brute force. With concealment broken, the entire acolyte cell rushed in. One of the mutant guards opened fire up with his autogun as Ulrich dodged from the cover of the catwalks. Ulrich rasied his hands at the guard and directed a mineral worm into his mind, forcing him to relive the past few seconds. As the autogun jammed, the guard twisted it in his hand over an over again, yelling swears. Meanwhile, Alexander and Thea drew their mono-swords and stormed down the gantries, hacking mutants apart while Quint brought fire support from his elevated position. It was then that Thea revealed what she referred to as her “fearful aura”. The mutants and acolytes alike were struck with a sudden blast of horror at the woman’s grey-skinned face, pallid and cruel. Ulrich, a psyker himself, kept his composure, but Alexander passed out and Quint rushed for the exit. The mutant in front of Thea promptly voided his stomach all over her, and when she stabbed him in the gut with her mono-blade, he only continued to wretch. As Quint dashed to make his escape he was cornered by none other than the ganger queen herself, clad in bones and leathers over a ratty yellow void suit. She lashed out at him with a wickedly curved hunting knife, slashing open his gut. Alexander, who by this time had regained consciousness, drew her laspistol and shot the ganger square in the eye, blinding her and knocking her out. The mine cleared, the acolyte cell returned to the town, clearing the filters on their rebreathers to keep out the stink of baking vomit. Thea strapped the ganger queen, along with as many packets of drugs from her throne as she could carry, to her tower shield for transport. On the ride back, Quint realized that he didn’t possess a micro-bead like everyone else and promptly ripped the hand vox out of the outrider. Back at town, the acolytes interrogated the mutant leader, and she revealed that she’d been running a drug ring with a local noble named Sykes. Sykes was the head of a corcase athex mining guild and also one of the town’s water farmers – his real fortune was made from sending crewed airships into the tumultuous stormy skies to harvest water from the irradiated atmosphere. Sykes had supplied her with the case, and she had dealed it. This case, a crystalline powder derived from corcase athex, could cause supernatural phenomena in the user, a high from beyond the planes. Evidently, they needed to pay this Sykes a visit. The cell travelled to his manor, after leaving the twist leader with Novus the Arbite. At the mansion, they discovered the ground and second story packed with disheveled-looking miners sleeping on cots and bedrolls. Sykes himself was nowhere to be found, but in his chambers they discovered a data-slate containing his ledgers and a journal. The slate revealed that Sykes had spent the money from the athex on beetle tents, food, security fences, and autogun turrets – evidently he was plotting to establish a fortified compound within the desrt. He journal was packed with mad scribblings, warning of a coming darkness, and that his people needed to flee lest they be taken. The portents, the cell realized, were prophecies of the coming of the Black Ship. Sykes and his miners had become renegade psykers from their exposure to corcase athex, and they were planning an exodus, funded by the distribution of a supernatural substance. This was a cult – a cult of witches. This was exactly the sort of thing that Penn had been on the watch for. It should be noted that while this occurred, Quint had decided to survey the area and had skirted round to the back of the building. There he had found Syke’s parked water zepelllin and, detaching its gas supply, ran a hose through a window into the manor to pump the gas into the building. The psykers began to grow woozy, and Ulrich and Thea, fearing that Quint intended to kill the psykers, ushered them out onto the lawn. There, they encountered a strange individual. A aged pale man with fiery red hair limped up to the manor but stopped at the sight of the cell. Thea and Ulrich immediately pegged him as a psyker – his aura had that distinctive feel to it. They assumed he was one of Sykes’s wards, and began to interrogate him. When the conversation grew heated, and one of them – no one remembers who – reached for a laspistol, the psyker threw up a blinding flash of light and made a run for it. Thea tackled him, and poor Red ended up strapped to Thea’s tower shield. Alvarez’s note: I later asked Lord Inquisitor Locke if I could speak to Acolyte Red about this incident, but my request was denied. Apparently his extensive injuries and cybernetic augmentations make it difficult for him to speak, and Locke tries to avoid mentioning Penn’s cell whenever possible for fear that Red will accidentally set something on fire again. The cell bungled Red into the back of the outsider vehicle and began to drive away. Quint, in a bizarre desire to “remove an evidence”, drew his laspistol and shot the house through an open window as they left. The manor, filled with gas from the zepellin, exploded. All of the psykers passed out inside, including those milling around on the lawn, died fiery deaths as their souls were delivered to the God-Emperor of Mankind for eternal judgment. Ulrich, Thea, and Alexander stared at Quint with open mouths as they realized that their one objective – ensure the tithing of psykers – had just been terminated by one of their own cell operatives. The boy grinned and chuckled, taking a glass of amasec from the table and swishing it around before taking a sip. He looked over at Alvarez. “Want one?” he asked. Alvarez nodded, and one of the lad’s doppelgangers stood and made his way to the liquor cabinet for another glass. “So this Quint…” Alvarez said. “He singlehandedly failed the entire mission objective?” “In his defense, it was an accident. He thought the psykers were clear. He likes to trust his gut instinct.” Alvarez laughed. “Shocking. Now I see why I’ve never come across any mention of him in any of the Inquisitorial annals.” “Well, actually,” the lad said, “That’s not the real reason.” “Oh?” Alvarez asked, accepting the drink from the boy’s clone. From the imbedded micro-auspices in his palms he ran a hypersonic diagnostic of its chemical composition – pure, it seemed. He drank. It was good. “No,” the boy said, stretching his legs out. “No, Quint was off the rails to begin with, but he got a lot worse later on – well, you’ll see why we had to put him down.” “You killed him?” Alvarez asked. The boy nodded. “But…” Alvarez frowned. “I thought you said he likes to trust his gut.” “Oh, he does.” The boy finished his drink and put it down on the table. The wolf growled, and he reached a hand down to stroke the animal’s neck. “Death didn’t really stick to him.” I hope you enjoyed the beginnings of the antics of Lukas, Thea, Beatrix and Quint. I intend to post the full campaign, most likely one "session's" worth of archives per week, so be sure to tune in!
  7. Crystal Geyser

    Should I warn my players?

    You know what? You've inspired me to write down the story of the whole campaign. We finished late last year, but I'll post it in chunks, probably in a new thread. I hope you all enjoy it.
  8. Here’s a (very much) WIP series of modifications to the Rogue Trader Core Ruleset. I’m interested in what you other players and GM might have to add or comment. Hope you find it interesting! ROGUE TRADER – THE SECOND EDITION MOD The following rules are intended to alter and modify the basic Rogue Trader Core Rulebook to provide a more controlled and realistic game experience. Many of the changes made are done so in order to alter player progression and create a more evenly distributed power level. Character Creation Xenos characters may use human career paths to represent their xenos counterparts. Each Race has a certain number of Human Career Paths they may utilize, with the following titles: Ork: Kaptin (Rogue Trader), Nob (Arch-Militant), Tradeboy (Seneschal, requires Blood Axes or Bad Moons Klan), Pilot (Void Master) Kroot: Warsphere Pilot (Void Master) Dark Eldar: Archon (Rogue Trader), Courtesan (Seneschal), Reaver (Void Master) Tau: Water Caste Diplomat (Seneschal), Air Caste Pilot (Void Master) Spending Experience Characteristics At character creation, each character chooses three Characteristics to be Favored, three Characteristics to be Neutral, and three Characteristics to be Opposed. The choices made by the player ought to reflect the character’s natural strengths and weaknesses. If the character gained a bonus or a penalty to a stat from their homeworld selection or race, one of their Favored Stats must be the one enhanced by their homeworld or race, and one of their Opposed Stats must be the one penalized by their homeworld or race. One of the character’s Favored Characteristics must be chosen from their Career Path’s Rank Advance Scheme (these Stats have 100 XP as their base cost for the first advance). One of the character’s Opposed Stats must be chosen from their Career Path’s Rank Advance Scheme (these Stats have 500 XP as their base cost for the first advance). Advancing a Favored Characteristic uses the following progression scheme for each +5 points: 100/250/500/750. Advancing a Neutral Characteristic uses the following progression scheme for each +5 points: 250/500/750/1000. Advancing an Opposed Characteristic uses the following progression scheme for each +5 points: 500/750/1000/1250. Skills Skills that utilize a True Characteristic for their Skill Test cost the following: Trained=100/+10=200/+20=300. Skills that utilize a Neutral Characteristic for their Skill Test cost the following: Trained=200/+10=300/+20=500. Skills that utilize an Opposed Characteristic for their Skill Test cost the following: Trained=300/+10=500/+20=1000. Talents Talents are divided into two Tiers – Primary Talents, and Secondary Talents. A Primary Talent may have Skill or Characteristic requirements, but does not have another Talent as a Prerequisite. A Secondary Talent is any Talent that has another Talent as its prerequisite. For example, Swift Attack, which grants two melee attacks, would be a Primary Talent, while its successor, Lightning Attack, which grants three melee attacks, would be a Secondary Talent because it requires the character to have first purchased Swift Attack. The costs of a Talent are based on what Characteristic or Skill Prerequisite the Talent has – in the case of a Talent without a Characteristic Prerequisite, the GM should use their sound judgment. True Talents cost 200 for Primary Talents and 250 for Secondary Talents. Neutral Talents cost 250 for Primary Talents and 500 for Secondary Talents. Opposed Talents cost 500 for Primary Talents and 1000 for Secondary Talents. Profit Factor Acquiring Gear using Profit Factor is no longer a test-against mechanic. Instead, it is a point-buy system. When determining how many points of Profit Factor an item costs, calculate its acquisition modifier. If the item has a positive acquisition modifier, its price is considered negligible and as such is free for the characters to purchase. If its price has a negative modifier, then for every -10 penalty to the Acquisition Test, the item costs 1 point of profit factor. When calculating an item’s price, do not utilize the quantity modifiers. Items must always be purchased individually. For example, say a Rogue Trader wishes to acquire a Best-craftsmanship power sword. A Power Sword is Very Rare (-20), and the modifier for Best Craftsmanship is -30. As such, the item would have a total acquisition modifier of -50. Instead of making an Acquisition Test, however, the players instead spend 5 points of profit factor from their pool to acquire the sword. Profit Factor, for the purposes of Rogue Trader, is measured on a scale of 1 to 100. A certain reserve of profit factor is always required to help maintain the dynasty’s off-world holdings, provide food for the ship’s crew, perform regular maintenance on the character’s gear, and the like. As such, a character can only purchase an item of a certain rarity if the group possesses a high enough profit factor threshold. The thresholds are listed below. 30PF: Scarce 40PF: Rare 50PF: Very Rare 60PF: Extremely Rare 70 PF: Near Unique 80 PF: Unique For example, if this Rogue Trader wished to purchase his Power Sword for 5 profit factor, he would need at least 50 profit factor due to the Rarity of the item. Selling an item only redeems ½ of its profit factor value. A starship hull costs a number of Profit Factor equal to the hull’s ship points. Any star ship component that costs ship points costs that many point of profit factor. However, selling a starship only redeems 1/10 of this amount. Crafting Items Alternatively, if a player wished, they can acquire the components to craft an item themselves for one point cheaper than it would cost to purchase the item. The item takes one week to craft for every point of profit factor that it would have cost had the components not been purchased separately. At the end of each week, have the crafting character make a relevant skill test. A successful skill tests indicates that the week’s effort improves the time, whereas a failed test adds another week to the total crafting time. Corruption and Insanity Corruption Points: Accumulated Corruption draws the soul of the character further and further away from the grace of the Emperor, opening their spirit to the invitations of malefic daemons. As the character falls further into debasement, the Emperor will turn away his patronage from the character until the character can no longer call upon his blessing. In addition to the usual rules for Corruption Points, namely Mutations and Malignancies, whenever a player wishes to spend or burn a Fate Point, the character rolls against their current number of Corruption Points (trying to roll ABOVE the number of corruption points they currently possess). If they pass the test, the effect of the spent or burnt fate point occurs as normal – if they fail, the effect of the fate point does not occur, but the fate point itself is still lost, either temporarily or permanently. Additionally, when making a Willpower Test to resist the influences of a creature with the Daemonic Trait (such as seduction by a Slaaneshi Daemon or possession by an Unclean Spirit), the character suffers a penalty equal to his current Corruption Point total. Insanity Points: Insanity Points drive the character further and further from his grasp on sanity. All Intelligence, Perception, Willpower and Felloswhip Tests suffer a -10 Penalty for every Degree of Madness a character possesses past the first, in addition to any other penalties from Mental Traumas and Disorders.
  9. Crystal Geyser

    Black Crusade Sector Generator Thread

    It seems Cognizar's map is down, but nevertheless I've got some new planets for the Sector! SKABRYTE It’s been a year since the Orks landed. They took out the spaceport, retrofitted it into some kind of manufactorum. We couldn’t stand against them – there were just too many. Most of the survivors have retreated into the underhive, nobles and gang scum alike. It’s almost amusing, really, watching the puffed-up parrots from the high spires still squabbling over palaces of shattered rebar and collapsing rockrete. Don’t they realize that this world is no longer their kingdom? A few weeks ago, one of the nobles tried to get together a possee to raid his holdings on the surface – said we could have whatever was still left in his collection, if only he could get his hands on some trinkets. Old family heirlooms, apparently. Go figure. If that’s what matters to him. ‘Cept you don’t go up onto the surface anymore. The glacier that the hive sits on keeps moving around, like there’s something…living…under it. Earthquakes are common – do you call them earthquakes if there’s no land, just ice? Anyways, you’d be lucky to make it a few miles without freezing or falling to your death, and that’s if you’re lucky. If you aren’t, then the Guests get you. I remember the first time I saw one of them. I had gone up to the surface – not to stick my head out for some fresh air, mind you, I’m not barking. No, some dolt recruit in the gang pissed off the higher ups, and it ended up being my job to deal with him. As we took the old chain-fed conveyor shuttle up I told him if he got a head start he might be able to make it to another burrow by nightfall. When we reached the surface, the entrance was surrounded with ice sculptures of lords and ladies in fancy dress – top hats, coattails, ball gowns, you name it. I figured it was just some prank, kicked him out into the snow, and went back down. I went up again week later – the security cams by the main entrance had frozen up and the boss needed me to take a gander at them. The statues were still there. So was the lad I kicked out there last week. It looked like they’d been…dancing with him. As I stared into his frozen, blue eyes, I knew he hadn’t survived it.
  10. Crystal Geyser

    Red Corsairs or the Black Legion?

    Thanks for all the help!
  11. Crystal Geyser

    Red Corsairs or the Black Legion?

    Sounds like a plan! My question is, if the Black Legion and Alpha Legion primarily operate in the Segmentum Obscurus, how is it that they could make it all the way to the Ultima Segmentum?
  12. Crystal Geyser

    Red Corsairs or the Black Legion?

    Thanks for the helpful note about the Armageddon War! Essentially, the Chaos Space Marine warband in the region, regardless of legion, will be looking to acquire an artifact capable of banishing and binding daemons - an artifact that the acolytes themselves are also hunting. Would the Black Legion or the Alpha Legion be more likely to be invested in such an artifact? I was thinking the Red Corsairs might be looking to use it to create a demonically possessed space hulk to add to their fleet, but if the Black Legion were here maybe they'd look at it as a way of using daemonic auxiliaries as reinforcements?
  13. Hey all, I'm GMing a Dark heresy campaign set in the Ultima Segmentum, and I was planning on having a small warband of Chaos Space Marines show up and get involved in the plot. Originally I was planning on having them be Black Legion, but seeing as the Eye of Terror is in the Segmentum Obscurus then it would make more sense to use a group of Red Corsairs from the Maelstrom, which is in the same segmentum? If so, I could then position the campaign roughly thirty years after the Badab War, during the time period when the Red Corsairs were mainly a fragmented force of raiders that was beginning to grow into a much larger fleet. That being said, the Black Legion could easily be off casts from a Black Crusade that reached the Ultima Segmentum due to some warp shenanigans. Which warband do you think makes more sense?
  14. Hey all, I'm just curious as to what other GMs here do to balance profit factor. I've GMd three long-term Rogue Trader campaigns over the past few years and always find that after a certain period, the players inevitably end up that they can all afford things like best quality terminator armor, best force fields, etc. etc. Do you other Gms run into this problem? If so, do you take steps to debuff PF to prevent this or do you prefer to just increase enemy power level accordingly to compensate?
  15. Crystal Geyser

    Should I warn my players?

    Introductions aside, I'll probably update this threat again over Christmas, as real life syndrome is being incredibly time consuming at the moment.
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