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CaptainRaspberry

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  1. Like
    CaptainRaspberry got a reaction from Aggressor97 in Rebel pay scale   
    An easy way to do it might be to adopt the requisition system from Deathwatch. Just translate "requisition points" directly into credit values and issue the group 1,000 RP at the start of every mission. You can increase this number as the group gains more clout within the Alliance. Then they use the RP to buy whatever gear they can get from the quartermaster, with the expectation that all gear will be returned in not-broken condition after the mission is over.
     
    However, your troops should still get paid. First, ascertain who they're actually employed by -- if they work directly for SpecForce, that's who signs their paychecks. If they're a privateer crew or a cell that works through a handler, their money comes through that one contact. Have a base payment per player of 100 or 500 or 1,000 credits, however much you're comfortable giving them. They get that with every completed mission.
     
    But that's just up front. Let them know that, as soldiers of the Alliance, they're also entitled to back-pay they receive at given intervals. This should be a much more and based on their contribution rank, either as a group or individually. Maybe throw a little extra in there based on rank, if you're tracking that. Portions of their back-pay is traditionally given out every three months, four months, six months, usually whenever they're scheduled to get leave. The full amount is given to them at the end of their tour. If they go AWOL, they get nothing of what's left. If they die, a pro-rated amount is sent to their next of kin.
     
    That may all be a little complicated, but that's how I think it should work.
  2. Like
    CaptainRaspberry got a reaction from SEApocalypse in This is the worse possible news for the game :(   
    Just stopping by to say goodbye to the RPG team. They were lovely folks, always helpful when contacted for questions or playtesting issues. I sincerely hope they land on their feet.
    I'm definitely mourning what appears to be the de-facto end of the SWRPG line. I haven't been a big fan of the compilation books, but that hasn't stopped me from buying them and understanding why some people probably love them. If Starships and Speeders comes out (which by all appearances it will) I'll definitely get it. I was very much looking forward to at least one sequel-era sourcebook, and I hope beyond hope that it was in development and might still see the light of day.
    Unfortunately, I always figured this day would come. RPGs are a niche market among gamers, no matter how popular D&D might be in a given news cycle. At least we got a fairly complete game line out of the deal, with enough material that I feel confident kitbashing or adapting the system to whatever I need. Combined with what we got from Genesys, I'm looking forward to many more years with this game. I doubt I'll follow the license to another publisher, if that happens.
    So good luck, and may the Force be with you. If you'll excuse me, I'm off to spend my Christmas money to pick up the L5R books I'm missing...
  3. Thanks
    CaptainRaspberry reacted to KungFuFerret in Please Stop Calling them Grey Jedi.   
    I know I'm tilting at windmills here, as it's become such a commonly used term that my hopes are doomed to failure, but I will try anyway!   But hey, as EVERY...SINGLE...STAR WARS thing tells us, Hope is everything!  It will save the day with it's ability to.....hope at stuff!  Because hope is just that powerful, and it has NOTHING at all to do with fanservice name dropping to New Hope in an effort to appease the fanbase!!  So here's hoping it will work!
    Seriously, don't call people who want to play with Dark side powers and actions but not be a bad guy Grey Jedi.   They are not "grey" Jedi.   This is someone wanting to gain the positive benefits of the term Jedi, in common usage and understanding, (someone who is powerful, but also a force for good in the universe), but also without having to actually adhere to their philosophies and doctrine of behavior.     The Jedi Code is very clear on what someone has to do to be a Jedi, and doing things that contradict that, mean you are NOT a Jedi.   Also, someone who is basically a Sith, but tries to not say they are a murderhobo, because of some token mention of the Jedi codes, and occasionally not killing and enslaving the people around them, equally doesn't make them a "Grey Jedi" from the other direction.  They are simply a less homicidal psychopath, than the other homicidal psychopaths they are around.  
    It's like trying to say you are a carnivorous vegan.  Or a murderous pacifist.   They are terms that are by definition, contrary and mutually exclusive.   
     
    That is all, proceed to ignore me and continue calling them that anyway!  Because I know you all will!   *tilts at a windmill one last time*
  4. Like
    CaptainRaspberry got a reaction from StriderZessei in Lightsaber Crystals (and where to find them)   
    Very cool. I admit that I tend to use Disney's version of crystals, where the color is a result of the tuner's personality rather than the quality of the crystal itself, but this is an excellent resource. Not only is it good for figuring out where crystals can be found, but it's good for ideas on homebrew crystals you can make for your table.
  5. Like
    CaptainRaspberry got a reaction from Archlyte in Player Character and the Terrible, Horrible, No-Good, Very Bad Day (Character/Setting Creation)   
    I've done this before with varying degrees of success. In general, my approach is an informal "sit around and chat" approach to character creation. We go through the process one step at a time and think out loud; I'll also feed my players some relevant details about my campaign. For example, if I tell them where the campaign will be starting (like a specific planet) and say each player should have a connection with it. Then, based on whatever the players come up with, I might do a quick narrative scene where they get the chance to feel out their character.
    As an example, using Edge of the Empire:
    Step one is choosing a background, so I would ask everyone to consider where in the galaxy their character comes from. Are they from an upper-class family that fell on hard times, or maybe they specifically had a fall from grace? Did they grow up in slums or the wilderness, where everything they had they fought for? Did they live an otherwise unremarkable life, except for one choice or mistake that got them in trouble with the authorities? At this stage, I encourage them to think as generally as possible, while writing down any ideas they have. Step two is choosing their Obligation, and that involves some specific thinking. With the general idea about a background, I ask them to think of what problems they might be facing. If nobody has a firm idea what they want their Obligation to be (which I describe to new players as "the part of your character's past they can't escape from, no matter how hard they try") I suggest picking two or three that sound promising, writing them down, and moving on. Step three is choosing a species, which is pretty straightforward already. I ask them to tie it back to what they thought for a background, maybe pinning down details about where they're from or what happened to push them to the fringes. Step four is choosing their career and first specialization, at which point I ask whether the character's previous life had any bearing on what they do on the edge of the galaxy, and if not, how they responded to their new situation—bearing in mind their Obligation, if they already picked one. Steps five through nine are all pretty straightforward, so we just go through one at a time. We spend more time on Motivations than any other single part, but I also have a house rule that makes Motivations more relevant in social encounters. I say that their first Motivation should address either where they came from in their background or where they hope to go, while the second can either address the other part of that or introduce something new and/or surprising about the character. We also hammer down any lingering details, like Obligation and anything they want to have written in stone about their background. (I tell them they're free to leave as much of their background fuzzy as they like, but anything they don't fill in with details I will.) So by the end, I've got a pretty good idea of who the characters are and what hooks I can include in the first session. And if the opportunity comes up to roleplay a little, I take it.
  6. Like
    CaptainRaspberry got a reaction from edisung in Creating Minions/Rivals/Nemesis   
    For rules, the EotE GM kit comes with some rules for creating nemeses.
  7. Like
    CaptainRaspberry got a reaction from DurosSpacer in Using the Force to increase Soak   
    For point #2, there are certain Force powers that specify in the language on the power tree that only one Force die can be committed, and others that lack that language. Enhance lacks that language. It also doesn't say that you can commit multiple Force dice if the language isn't present. So... by RAW, you can commit multiple Force dice, but maybe each one takes one Action?
     
    And actually, for point #1, I can't find where it says that committing a Force die is an Action anywhere in the book. It does say that, if the Force power requires an Action, then committing is an Action, but it doesn't say what to do with powers like Enhance, where it's usually a Force die added to a different check.
  8. Like
    CaptainRaspberry got a reaction from Ghostofman in What options did Jedi have to settle disputes?   
    Their role as negotiators/mediators was almost entirely driven by the Republic. When Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan went to Naboo, it was at the behest of the chancellor. The Jedi served as the leaders of the Grand Army of the Republic by request of the Senate. Virtually all the times we see the Jedi intercede in any affair, it's because a request was made by the government of the Republic to the Jedi Council.
    So in that sense, they have the weight of the Republic behind them. They can't pass laws, authorize spending, or impose sanctions, but they're acting as the representatives of those who can. Jedi involvement is respected, in part because of their martial skill and their command over a mystical power no one else really understands. So when it seems like an official Republic delegation won't be respected, they call on the Jedi.
    For what it's worth, recent stories—particularly in the comics—have indicated that the Jedi aren't entirely comfortable with this role. Not so much the "acting as good-faith mediators" part, but the "being used by the Senate for their own purposes" part.
  9. Like
    CaptainRaspberry reacted to penpenpen in Jedi Order, 6000 years old?   
    The point that you keep on missing is that "first" might be relative.
  10. Haha
    CaptainRaspberry reacted to Jedi Ronin in Compare/Contrast Saga Edition and FFG Star Wars   
    Clearly armor being accurately simulated a long time ago in a galaxy far far away is essential to which Star Wars roleplaying system you pick. The ramifications are immense. Choose carefully. 
  11. Like
    CaptainRaspberry got a reaction from Jedi Ronin in Jedi Order, 6000 years old?   
    We've also seen that the Jedi Order has this nasty habit of being wiped out on occasion. It could be that this "Prime Jedi" was the Luke/Rey of that iteration, after some period of time during which the previous iteration of Jedi met their end and this person had to rebuild. Heck, there's reason to doubt that the Prime Jedi's iteration is even the same iteration that we saw in the prequels.
    To copy @penpenpen: "Ahch-To was the first Jedi temple. Ossus was the first Jedi temple. Both of these statements are true."
  12. Like
    CaptainRaspberry got a reaction from Underachiever599 in Jedi Order, 6000 years old?   
    That was my point, yeah.
  13. Thanks
    CaptainRaspberry got a reaction from Goken91 in How long to play beginner box?   
    It took my group two sessions. We have five-hour sessions, which usually translates to four hours of actual gameplay.
    If you're thinking of adding on the "In the Palace of the Emerald Champion" online module, that took an additional three sessions.
  14. Haha
    CaptainRaspberry got a reaction from Bayushi Tsubaki in Courtiers in combat?   
    Wait a minute.
    Your lord is letting you faff about in combat without a yojimbo you can boss around?
    Sounds like it's time for some protest-seppuku.
    In all seriousness, I think a Performance check would serve in that case. Your goal could be to agitate your foes and keep them off-balance, or else to pump up your fellow samurai—maybe by composing the battle poem in the moment. I think you could also make actual combat rolls, just from more defensive stances. (I'm AFB right now, so I don't remember if "Fanning the Flames" requires the Fire stance or not.)
  15. Haha
    CaptainRaspberry reacted to Edgehawk in Can the clones breed?   
    Slow down, dude. It was just a kiss...
  16. Like
    CaptainRaspberry got a reaction from Underachiever599 in Jedi Order, 6000 years old?   
    We've also seen that the Jedi Order has this nasty habit of being wiped out on occasion. It could be that this "Prime Jedi" was the Luke/Rey of that iteration, after some period of time during which the previous iteration of Jedi met their end and this person had to rebuild. Heck, there's reason to doubt that the Prime Jedi's iteration is even the same iteration that we saw in the prequels.
    To copy @penpenpen: "Ahch-To was the first Jedi temple. Ossus was the first Jedi temple. Both of these statements are true."
  17. Like
    CaptainRaspberry got a reaction from Daeglan in Jedi Order, 6000 years old?   
    We've also seen that the Jedi Order has this nasty habit of being wiped out on occasion. It could be that this "Prime Jedi" was the Luke/Rey of that iteration, after some period of time during which the previous iteration of Jedi met their end and this person had to rebuild. Heck, there's reason to doubt that the Prime Jedi's iteration is even the same iteration that we saw in the prequels.
    To copy @penpenpen: "Ahch-To was the first Jedi temple. Ossus was the first Jedi temple. Both of these statements are true."
  18. Like
    CaptainRaspberry reacted to Stan Fresh in Jedi Order, 6000 years old?   
    See also: the Roman Empire fell in both 476 AD and 1453 AD.
  19. Like
    CaptainRaspberry reacted to penpenpen in Jedi Order, 6000 years old?   
    Also, consider the following:
    China was founded 70 years ago.
    China was founded more than 2000 years ago.
    Both of these statements are true.
  20. Like
    CaptainRaspberry reacted to KungFuFerret in Jedi Order, 6000 years old?   
    Normally I would assume he meant it to mean "a really **** long time" just like most everyone else.  But this is Star Wars, and fans are insane about the details of this crap.  Normally I wouldn't care, but there is a significant scale of difference in time if you say years versus generations.    Perhaps he didn't mean 25k years, but 1000 generations of time, is significantly more than 1000 years.  More than an order of magnitude in difference.   So if the topic is "how long was the Republic around" and we have conflicting source materials, all we can do is work with what is provided in the source materials.    If he had meant over a thousand years, he could've just said that.  Anyone with a reasonable understanding of language would assume he meant "a long time, somewhere over 1000 years, hence why he said it that way."   But generations is significantly longer, and since that difference adds up to 4x the time this new canon establishes (roughly 6k) it is worthy of note I think.   
    Again, this is all irrelevant really, as it's all just "stuff that happened before".  The only stuff that really matters for the purposes of the franchise are the events going forward.  The rest is literally just flavor text, and something not really on the minds of the people making up the new stories.
  21. Like
    CaptainRaspberry got a reaction from GroggyGolem in What options did Jedi have to settle disputes?   
    Their role as negotiators/mediators was almost entirely driven by the Republic. When Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan went to Naboo, it was at the behest of the chancellor. The Jedi served as the leaders of the Grand Army of the Republic by request of the Senate. Virtually all the times we see the Jedi intercede in any affair, it's because a request was made by the government of the Republic to the Jedi Council.
    So in that sense, they have the weight of the Republic behind them. They can't pass laws, authorize spending, or impose sanctions, but they're acting as the representatives of those who can. Jedi involvement is respected, in part because of their martial skill and their command over a mystical power no one else really understands. So when it seems like an official Republic delegation won't be respected, they call on the Jedi.
    For what it's worth, recent stories—particularly in the comics—have indicated that the Jedi aren't entirely comfortable with this role. Not so much the "acting as good-faith mediators" part, but the "being used by the Senate for their own purposes" part.
  22. Thanks
    CaptainRaspberry got a reaction from LazerSwordsman in What options did Jedi have to settle disputes?   
    Their role as negotiators/mediators was almost entirely driven by the Republic. When Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan went to Naboo, it was at the behest of the chancellor. The Jedi served as the leaders of the Grand Army of the Republic by request of the Senate. Virtually all the times we see the Jedi intercede in any affair, it's because a request was made by the government of the Republic to the Jedi Council.
    So in that sense, they have the weight of the Republic behind them. They can't pass laws, authorize spending, or impose sanctions, but they're acting as the representatives of those who can. Jedi involvement is respected, in part because of their martial skill and their command over a mystical power no one else really understands. So when it seems like an official Republic delegation won't be respected, they call on the Jedi.
    For what it's worth, recent stories—particularly in the comics—have indicated that the Jedi aren't entirely comfortable with this role. Not so much the "acting as good-faith mediators" part, but the "being used by the Senate for their own purposes" part.
  23. Like
    CaptainRaspberry got a reaction from QorDaq in Best way to learn the differences quickly?   
    There's no substitute for reading the rules, certainly. But if you're already familiar with the Star Wars RPG, you already know most of it. There's no change to what the symbols mean, and the dice even have the same distribution. You'll know the hardest parts of the system, including using advantages, threats, triumphs, and despairs. Instead, here's a list of areas where you can focus on the few key differences:
    You'll need to learn how Story Points are different from Destiny Points. Read up on how archetypes and careers work. Archetypes aren't necessarily the same as species, and while careers are similar to how they are in Star Wars, there are a few important changes. You'll need to familiarize yourself with how players buy talents, i.e., build a talent pyramid. Most of the skills are the same or similar, but there are a few handy sidebars in the book that describe why some skills might get simplified and grouped together while others are split up into new skills. ("Computers" becoming "Hacking" and "Sysops" is one example.) One of the major changes I actually really like and have incorporated into my Star Wars games is the beefed-up social encounter rules. You'll want to read those. And of course, if your planned setting uses magic, you'll want to read that part and decide how you want magic to work in your game. Otherwise, you're pretty much ready to go.
  24. Like
    CaptainRaspberry got a reaction from Bojanglez in Best way to learn the differences quickly?   
    There's no substitute for reading the rules, certainly. But if you're already familiar with the Star Wars RPG, you already know most of it. There's no change to what the symbols mean, and the dice even have the same distribution. You'll know the hardest parts of the system, including using advantages, threats, triumphs, and despairs. Instead, here's a list of areas where you can focus on the few key differences:
    You'll need to learn how Story Points are different from Destiny Points. Read up on how archetypes and careers work. Archetypes aren't necessarily the same as species, and while careers are similar to how they are in Star Wars, there are a few important changes. You'll need to familiarize yourself with how players buy talents, i.e., build a talent pyramid. Most of the skills are the same or similar, but there are a few handy sidebars in the book that describe why some skills might get simplified and grouped together while others are split up into new skills. ("Computers" becoming "Hacking" and "Sysops" is one example.) One of the major changes I actually really like and have incorporated into my Star Wars games is the beefed-up social encounter rules. You'll want to read those. And of course, if your planned setting uses magic, you'll want to read that part and decide how you want magic to work in your game. Otherwise, you're pretty much ready to go.
  25. Thanks
    CaptainRaspberry got a reaction from DangerShine Designs in Best way to learn the differences quickly?   
    There's no substitute for reading the rules, certainly. But if you're already familiar with the Star Wars RPG, you already know most of it. There's no change to what the symbols mean, and the dice even have the same distribution. You'll know the hardest parts of the system, including using advantages, threats, triumphs, and despairs. Instead, here's a list of areas where you can focus on the few key differences:
    You'll need to learn how Story Points are different from Destiny Points. Read up on how archetypes and careers work. Archetypes aren't necessarily the same as species, and while careers are similar to how they are in Star Wars, there are a few important changes. You'll need to familiarize yourself with how players buy talents, i.e., build a talent pyramid. Most of the skills are the same or similar, but there are a few handy sidebars in the book that describe why some skills might get simplified and grouped together while others are split up into new skills. ("Computers" becoming "Hacking" and "Sysops" is one example.) One of the major changes I actually really like and have incorporated into my Star Wars games is the beefed-up social encounter rules. You'll want to read those. And of course, if your planned setting uses magic, you'll want to read that part and decide how you want magic to work in your game. Otherwise, you're pretty much ready to go.
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