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polyheadronman

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  1. Like
    polyheadronman got a reaction from JohnGarrison1870 in Exhausting "Refresh Actions" due to other card effect?   
    Also, the "refresh" action card never physically exhausts.  You never "tap" it.  Now this can mean that a player with their three regular actions exhausted can be stuck not being able to use certain gear and item cards.
  2. Like
    polyheadronman got a reaction from FireSpy in Han Solo Pilot ability question   
    I know this may be the wrong forum for this post, but I wanted to give feedback to those who helped.
     
    Things worked out great.
     
    "Juke and the Fat Han"
    Han with shield up, predator, Jan Ors and Rec Spec.
     
    Poe with Int/Astro, Juke, Comm Relay and R2-D2.
     
    98 pts gave me initiative in all games, and there were two where I needed it.  I came in second!
     
    Pros:  Han used his ability and predator all the time.  Being able to get another shot at a crap roll, or try and improve a mediocre one was huge.  I never had to TL (what's the point?), and used foc/ev every turn to great effect.  He was basically super tank.  In fact, he didn't burn once.
     
    Even went up against a nameless VT with rebel captive.  At first I hated attacking with Han (didn't want Poe to stress), but he is so tank, I would eat two stress and shed one.  Eat another, then shed (by green moves, obviously).  The dice were with me, so I didn't lose too much HP.  It ended in a mod win for my opponent, but it was fun!
     
    Poe was fantastic as well, and that Juke/Comm is the poop.  The T-70 breathes new life into the ship, even if it doesn't completely revitalize the old war horse, the T-65.
     
    Opponents seem unsure of who to attack first, as there is no clear target in this build.  They know Han will take forever but likely give them the Mod Win, but Poe is so deadly on the outskirts of the skirmish, plus his regen makes him almost as hard to kill, unless you  can get me into an odd rush of maneuvers which prevent that constant green maneuver/focus action combo.
     
    Tallon roll.  Nuff said.  Didn't use it much, but boy was it there when I needed it.  Poe makes a great blocker if you know your opponents moves well enough.  Regen Poe is not scared to get right in the thick of it.
     
    Cons:
    Two ships are susceptible to concentrated fire.  I came up against an X mini-swarm.  Wes, Wedge and Luke.  With Wedge lowering agility (Han killer) and Wes stripping tokens (watch that evade, Poe!), that was the toughest match of the day.  I sweat bullets for the first engagement, and lost all but four hull on Han over the course of the game, as Wedge consistently had me rolling 0 Agil.
     
    I brought it to a mod win after flying Poe into the formation to break it up.  Picked off Wes and Wedge after my opponent made a bad maneuver trying to keep formation, and chased regen Luke (I think he had R5-P9) around the board until time.
     
    Poe feels naked if you aren't focusing every turn.  Because Juke only works on one half of the combat round, he seems like a wasted investment on the other half if you don't have the eyeball to play with.
     
    Two ships are easy to run, but it is stressful.  You know that if you lose one, you are most of the way dead.
     
    Thanks again to those who helped out with my Han question, it really helped me out.  Fly Casual!
  3. Like
    polyheadronman got a reaction from alexbobspoons in Warhammer Quest vs LOTR LCG   
    One last thing to add:
     
    I know almost nothing about the WH universe, having never spent much time playing/reading/experiencing anything to do with it.  One thing FFG seems to have done very well is create a game that has an IP, yet players don't have to know a darn thing about it to experience the game and enjoy it.
     
    I love this game and still have no knowledge about the IP.  As long as players can understand the common archetypes and adversaries present in just about any fantasy themed world, they can get into the game.
     
    Hope that helps in getting your fiance to play.
  4. Like
    polyheadronman reacted to Parravon in Questions for organizing a small tournament   
    I think they found it creates a better point spread for determining the cut. With your round robin, and a 75-minute game time, that's going to take the best part of 8 hours to play through, including the final. You need to ensure that all the players are up for that, because that's quite a long day, even for X-Wing.
     
    I ran an eight player tournament that was only three rounds, and with the FFG points system, we had a clear points leader after the three rounds. And I didn't bother with a top pair match. I decided at the beginning that it was the player with the most points after three rounds was the winner. Even then, it took around five hours to run. 
  5. Like
    polyheadronman got a reaction from mearn4d10 in Questions for organizing a small tournament   
    Thanks very much for your help!
     
    I don't have an iOS device.  Only Android/Win10, but Cryodex should work.
     
    The round robin is long, but half of us have never played together, having only just met via webz. We thought it would give everyone a chance to meet and play each other at least once.  As you say though, the RR format would be time consuming for sure...
     
    I will give the official tourney rules a look and see how it maths out.  I didn't realize their format accounted for small groups! (clearly I'm not a competitive player)
  6. Like
    polyheadronman got a reaction from alexbobspoons in Show some love for WQACG   
    I got the game just before xmas and went out of my way to find the devs and thank them.  Too many people use the internet to complain, not nearly enough use it to praise.
     
    Looking forward to the next Adventure!
  7. Like
    polyheadronman reacted to Gazery in Attacking a face down enemy   
    As soon as you turn the card over, any relevant card effects will kick in. So if it has resilience it will reduce the damage done. If it is a pesky bat then any damage done will be ignored, because it can't take wounds in the shadows. It's a risk with attacking face down cards.
    And don't forget that you have to assign all damage counters to face down cards before you turn them over. So you can't deal a face down card one damage so that you get to turn it over and then decide what to do with the rest of the damage.
  8. Like
    polyheadronman reacted to John Constantine in Expansions   
    I do too, but how else would anybody hear about them if not from the news page of this very site?
  9. Like
    polyheadronman got a reaction from Redshirt0909 in Force Senstive Exile / Force Sensitive Emergent   
    I would think that this sort of player progression has not only been planned for by FFG, but would also be encouraged.  What I am curious about is how well the Specs "stack," and if this does not lead to OPing your Jedi.
     
    The one area where previous iterations of the IP have consistently failed is their representation of the Jedi.  They have always outgrown the other party classes and roles too fast.  I hope FFG has managed to smooth that wrinkle a bit.
  10. Like
    polyheadronman got a reaction from Alekzanter in Elite Minions   
    Here's another idea:
     
    My group is on the Wheel during Act 1 of Beyond the Rim.
     
    Because of the heightened security following a major rebel sighting,  I informed my group that they would only be able to carry sidearms.  No big weapons.  My E/BGH and BH/A have been on their best behaviour ever since, as the weapons that they depend so much on to give them their edge in combat are sitting in a locker on their ship.  Because of that, the rest of the party is also behaving, since their heavy hitters are (as far as they are concerned), unable to be back up.
     
    Now it doesn't matter that the party can still effectively hold their own with a little ingenuity and adaptive problem solving.  What really matters is that sometimes you can make enemies more powerful by taking away your party's resources, rather than buffing your enemies.'
  11. Like
    polyheadronman got a reaction from Alekzanter in Pour one out for my FLGS.   
    I have grown up in a rural Ontario town.  We had to drive twenty minutes to an hour over the years to get to different stores and get our gaming fixes, and the closer stores just didn't cut the mustard in terms of profitability, I think for obvious reasons.  This of course, was in the days before the internet, when Dragon Magazine and in-store calenders were our only indication of when new stuff was coming out.
     
    As an adult, I have become conscious of local economy and have continued to support FLGS's wherever I can.
     
    Recently in Hamilton, Ontario, we lost another one, and in this case, it was partly due to the web.
     
    Bayshore Hobbies had been a staple of the Hamilton gaming community for decades, and was run by a delightful woman and her husband, an avid strategy gamer, and each of them voracious tabletop gamers.  If you like, search Bayshore Hobbies, Hamilton on FB.  They still organize casual and themed game nights in different locations around the city.  They have photos of their final days, as well as notes and tributes from long time customers turned friends.  It was a true mom and pop store with the kind of staff that help guide people's lives when they need it most.
     
    As internet trade became more common and convenient, Rose lost business, as I think a lot of establishments in any industry did.  What made it harder and harder to compete though, was demoralization over price wars.  So many customers would come in and challenge the pricing of an item by finding a better price on the internet and demanding the owners to match/beat it, on threat of taking their money elsewhere.  After a while, seeing people come in and take pictures of their inventory and plug it into Google Goggles right there in front of her became too much.
     
    I'm sure there were other factors involved in the closing of the store, but ultimately the owner's love of the store was defined by the love of the hobby and their mutual affection for their customers.  I think it began to be a bitter exchange, and they decided to end it before it sucked the life out of the hobby.  As I said earlier, they still organize events, promote local designers and products, and generally haven't left the hobby, but the store itself is gone, and that is bitter sweet.
     
    I can understand stinky, elitist jerk establishments, and understand a desire not to support that economy.  I am a musician as well as a gamer, and there is no group more guilty of elitist, clique ridden arrogance and self-importance than the world of art and music.  I have been to many a music store full of self-righteous, egotistical music snobs and their over-priced, gouging wares (I'm looking at you Music Pro, Barrie).  If you can't bring yourself to give them money, don't.  I don't.
     
    All of that said, brick and mortar is an amazing thing.  The first time I took my son to a real gaming store, it was like walking into wonderland.  His eyes went wide and he stared at all the boxes, displays, minis and props that littered the room.  I was reminded that that must have been the look on my face the first time I went into a game store.  Having inherited a limited amount of AD&D books from my aunt and uncle, I was awe struck to see the massive display shelf of 2E resources at the far end of the room when I first set foot in the door.
     
    There are two reasons to support an FLGS.  One, you keep your money in your town, or at least in your region.  You help make things go round in your little corner of the world, and as I get older (I'm 37), I have been able to look beyond the selfish arrogance and ignorance of my youth and see how my dollars change the world, even in a minute way, by putting food on the tables of people in my community.  That's important to me now.
     
    Two.  At some point in your past, whether by inheriting books like I did, or walking past a classroom or cafeteria table at school, you started down this road.  At some point you were lost and outnumbered by a world where your interests were in the minority, and you started to speak a language that so few understood, it left you searching for a place to belong, where you could make your world a little bigger.  And then you found it.  You saw the marquee, or your cousin/friend, etc.  said there is a place for us, and you stepped inside.  Everybody there spoke your language, and everywhere you looked, there was MORE.  At that moment, you were reborn.
     
    And you kept going.  Maybe it wasn't for long.  Maybe the people there were on the ******-y side and you bought your items and that's all you ever did, but it was a kind of bastion.  A home free kind of retreat.  A wooby.  I loved going to the various stores in my part of the world.  It was like a secret club, and I knew the handshake.  You know those stories about iconic bands or artists where fans claim that they were down such a dark path and headed for the end, when so-and-so came into their lives with whichever album and saved them?  That's what an FLGS can do for us.
     
    In my town we have finally had a game store added to the mix, and my above point was proven.  A girl of about twelve expressed interest in D&D night, and so her mom, gramma, and sisters all came down and the owner ran a starter session.  Since then, this girl and her sister and a couple of friends she has recruited have come back week after week, and her mom has said how great it is to have her coming a little further out of the shell and finding her own.  When I show up to run our weekly EotE game, I am always glad to see that table show up, because however long it lasts, that girl has found a little sanctuary to explore this world and herself.  That is important to her, whether she knows it or not.
     
    That is not to say that everyone has an awesome time in a store.  I am sure that a store full of A-holes might have crushed the same girl.  Those should be the exception, not the rule.  That is up to us to change, by getting involved or at least expressing our opinions as customers and consumers, and ultimately, if need be taking our dollars elsewhere.
     
    If you have stuck with me until now, thank you.  I have been thinking about this over the last little while, and this topic gave me the muse to get it out.  I'm not trying to be soap-box-ish or lecture anyone, this is more of an Op-Ed kind of rant, and you may take it for what it is.
     
    My family and I try very hard to support local business in any capacity, and while we can't do it 100% of the time, we try very hard where we can to support the businesses we like and agree with, and spend no money at the places we don't.
     
    I'm always sad to see any small business close, but in this case, they made it.  They retired.  Life is good.  Good for them.
  12. Like
    polyheadronman got a reaction from Jaspor in Question re: starship combat. Who likes it? who doesn't? Why?   
    I'm starting this as an opinion poll.  Who likes starship combat?  Who doesn't?
     
    More importantly, how are you using or house ruling the system at your table?
     
    My group went through the beginner game krayt fang vs. TIE fighter encounter and everyone thought, "huh.  That wasn't as much fun as we thought it would be."
     
    Since then we haven't had any more, but as I am going to take them through the published adventures (core, GM screen and BtRim) they will likely encounter it again.
     
    Any advice to share, or stories would also be appreciated.
  13. Like
    polyheadronman got a reaction from kaosoe in Tales of the Hydian Way (podcast): On the Horizon   
    Can't wait to listen to the new episode!  Also, don't forget to support the Mad Adventurers through Patreon.
  14. Like
    polyheadronman reacted to KRKappel in AOR GMK Dead In The Water Reports   
    Hello EotE and AoR GMs! I'm really curious to get some player/GM feedback on the Dead in the Water adventure I wrote in the AOR GMK. If you have run the adventure, I'd be fascinated to hear your tales of triumph and despair, derailings, what worked really well, and what didn't, just to incorporate some fan feedback into whatever I might write in the future, adventure wise.
  15. Like
    polyheadronman got a reaction from thatwalshguy in Shopping and Destroying PC gear.   
    Nobody has touched on the big ******-y gun problem.
     
    You don't have to destroy the PCs gun.  I have a big game hunter with a +5 slugthrower of everything killing, and a BH/Assassin with a jetpack and a flame projector in the party.  When they start to do too much crazy, I have a few things I use to limit that.
     
    I like to put them very close and/or far away from the action when I can.  He invested in a long-range capable PC, so I shorten the distance.  It makes him duck for cover and squirm like a fish.  That way, I can put enemies within engaged, making his gun risky to use.  For the flame projector, keep the enemies far away.  That way, she has to risk getting close.
     
    I use dynamic battlefield elements to limit the swath of terror.  PCs are not the only ones who use cover, so I create terrain features and visual obstacles to cut off line of site.  That way, they can only take out one or two enemies before having to re-position.  Again, creating challenge and risk.  This also gives the rest of the group a chance to have an equal impact.
     
    Put them in situations where they are not allowed to carry their fave weapons.  A spaceport that enforces a hand gun only rule of law, or a settlement that abhors violence of any kind.  My PCs love their "signature" weapons like blank-ies.  Take their woobies away and watch how nervous they get.  That gives you opportunities as a GM to create encounters that force the group outside their comfort zones and thinking creatively.  It also has the effect of causing the players to diversify XP spending, so that they are better prepared to deal with adverse conditions next time.
     
    Use adversary talents!  Use lots of setback dice!  Give him great armour, superior weapons and Adversary 3!  Go overboard on Brawn and Agility and make him the impossible killing machine.  Create an encounter that HAS to be solved by other means, making the BFG 9000 a sideshow novelty at best.
     
    Last but not least, use the despair to disable the weapon.  It runs out of ammo.  It gets jammed. etc.  Disable it for one, two or even three rounds.  Give the adversary a chance to do some real damage or make an epic escape.  That way you are not being called out as a ****, because you have not taken away the weapon.  What you have done is make the challenge an ACTUAL CHALLENGE.
     
    However, one PCs weapon should not be the centerpiece and focus of each combat.  It just makes it boring for everyone else.
     
    If nothing else, be a **** and take away the shiny.  If it is seriously derailing fun and challenge, it is no longer fun and challenging.  Even the player will get bored with the kill everything stick after a while, so just speed up the process.  If breaking the gun is breaking the game for the little whiner, then perhaps that person needs to find a different group to play with.  Tell them that.  Your weapon is so awesome.  So great, that you are sucking the fun out.  Don't break the weapon, but outfit an adversary with the SAME weapon.  Then kill the PC instead.  You're not a **** because you did not destroy the weapon.  Turn about is fair play.
  16. Like
    polyheadronman got a reaction from Liloki in Balancing combat with non-combat oriented PCs   
    Sounds like you are too focused on one thing: combat.  Make sure you have an encounter that works for the scholar, one for the pilot, etc.  A non-combat group should have non-combat encounters.
     
    in the meantime:
    Use minion groups liberally.  Either bunch them up into one skilled roll (say, against the Marauder), or break up the rolls into the lesser skilled base rolls.  Make sure the adversaries are doing things other than just shooting so that the group has a chance to turn the tide of battle without risking life and limb.  Dynamic battlefields that supply obvious tactical advantage to the group like terrain features, higher ground, gunnery emplacements make it fun, interesting and creative.
     
    Suggest ways to use the party's non-combat skills to effect.  Use Leadership to demoralize, knowledge to gain insight, piloting or computers to send machinery plowing into the enemy.
     
    Encourage your players to work within their limitations and think creatively.  That's when the fun begins...
  17. Like
    polyheadronman reacted to segara82 in Shopping and Destroying PC gear.   
    In my last session our group was exploring the wreck of a Separatist warship floating in space. Our mechanic (with her brand new Int-implant) was having a ball with all the useable junk. In the end they ran into a few wrecked B1s and as the highlight of the evening into a pair of working and alerted Droidekas.
     
    Our mechanic tried to slice the wardroids every turn to shut them down or otherwise hinder them. She rolled well enough to at least stun one of them. Every time when she had threats left i let her test Resiliance or suffer strain damage. But on the last roll she had both a Triumph and a Despair. So she both managed to stun the droids for 2 rounds, but blew a fuse in her Implant (damaged but salvageable).
     
    Of course she had to roll Resilience but in the end failed and was knocked unconcious.
  18. Like
    polyheadronman reacted to Liloki in Shopping and Destroying PC gear.   
    In early sessions of my campaign, the shopping mandalorians would bog down sessions with half hour shopping adventures every few sessions. If was really boring for me and the other players so I off-loaded it all to downtime between game sessions. Basically, no more shop talk about which odds or ends to buy take place at the group table. That's what the campaign forums are for. Stuff that is Rarity 5 or less and not Restricted, they can easily find and acquire during downtime unless there's something going on in the campaign to affect that (with the Galactic Civil War now in full swing in my campaign's timeline, medical supplies are at a premium now as are munitions).
     
    Stuff that is Restricted or Rarity 6+ they need to make the checks to find the markets to acquire said items. But now they've decided what they're going after before the sessions instead of having rolling discussions over it at the table where it bores the crap out of 2/3 of the people there. Since I made these changes, personal character shopping has never taken more than 10 minutes tops and the rest of us at the table are a lot happier.
     
    As for wrecking their toys... I whole-heartedly support wrecking their gear once in awhile with Despair. There are damage levels for gear, so popping an occasional Despair most of the time just puts their favorite toy at Minor damage. That adds all of a Setback die until repaired. Any player that cries about that needs to grow up. On the off chance you get to pop two Despairs on their favourite gun it would go to Moderate (still works but adds a Difficulty die until repaired). That's a complication that their character has to deal with but can be addressed after the combat with repair checks that are not hard. Again, nothing so dire that they should be whining over. It will cost them some credits but otherwise is inconsequential beyond adding dramatic interest to a particular encounter or two.
  19. Like
    polyheadronman reacted to Jamwes in Shopping and Destroying PC gear.   
    I'm a big fan of doing shopping in down time. We just wrapping up the session and people are packing up? Waiting for people to arrive to start the game? Have time to talk with or email the GM between sessions? Ask the GM quick if you can buy stuff.
     
    You can even do "future" shopping. What I mean about that is this example, during the middle of a mission the players might come across some cash. The playing session might end with some loose ends to tie up quick during the next session then jump into the next mission quick, but the characters aren't in a natural down time between game sessions. Instead of waiting for the mission to end and taking up playing time shopping between missions, the player could ask the GM, "Can I go shopping for X gun the next time we have free time?" during down time between sessions. Then roll the dice and have them spend the money. Hold them to the results, good or bad. Then, the next time the party has adequate down time, the GM can narriate the player going out to pick up their new gear.
     
    As for the gun, well, gear is always a tricky situation. I can imagine a lot of players being upset if their prize gear was broken or stolen. However, it could set up a fun adventure. Gotta go track town the thief or find a mechanic who can fix it. In combat, you can disarm with a few advantages as well. Spend a couple more to have the weapon fall away from him so he has to spend time going after it. As the GM, you'll have to gauge the player's maturity levels. I don't mean that with any disrespect. What I mean to say is a novice player is more prone to never want their expensive gear to be messed with while a veteran player understands it's all part of the story. Do what you think is right for you and the play group to maximise fun.
  20. Like
    polyheadronman reacted to Shinagani in Shopping and Destroying PC gear.   
    Due to the style of our game we handle gear acquisition off screen, with a negotiation roll to determine price.
     
    But I do have a gun nut Bounty Hunter whose character is molded around his tricked out Heavy Blaster Rifle. I pulled the d*** move and robbed him of his sweet gun, but sometimes it's the only option that makes sense. He leapt out of a building, into an airspeeder (Clone wars style gunship) and one of the troops rushed him. Since I knew he would plug the guy point blank I had the trooper use his advantage to knock the heavy blaster rifle out of the gunship. So now we had the bounty hunter grappling hand to hand on the edge of a 1,000 foot fall - much more interesting than just rolling another ranged heavy check.
     
    It's definitely something I wouldn't recommend doing often, but being reminded that gear isn't permanent encourages players to carry alternative equipment, and appreciate the nice gear they can hold onto.
  21. Like
    polyheadronman got a reaction from Liloki in Shopping and Destroying PC gear.   
    Nobody has touched on the big ******-y gun problem.
     
    You don't have to destroy the PCs gun.  I have a big game hunter with a +5 slugthrower of everything killing, and a BH/Assassin with a jetpack and a flame projector in the party.  When they start to do too much crazy, I have a few things I use to limit that.
     
    I like to put them very close and/or far away from the action when I can.  He invested in a long-range capable PC, so I shorten the distance.  It makes him duck for cover and squirm like a fish.  That way, I can put enemies within engaged, making his gun risky to use.  For the flame projector, keep the enemies far away.  That way, she has to risk getting close.
     
    I use dynamic battlefield elements to limit the swath of terror.  PCs are not the only ones who use cover, so I create terrain features and visual obstacles to cut off line of site.  That way, they can only take out one or two enemies before having to re-position.  Again, creating challenge and risk.  This also gives the rest of the group a chance to have an equal impact.
     
    Put them in situations where they are not allowed to carry their fave weapons.  A spaceport that enforces a hand gun only rule of law, or a settlement that abhors violence of any kind.  My PCs love their "signature" weapons like blank-ies.  Take their woobies away and watch how nervous they get.  That gives you opportunities as a GM to create encounters that force the group outside their comfort zones and thinking creatively.  It also has the effect of causing the players to diversify XP spending, so that they are better prepared to deal with adverse conditions next time.
     
    Use adversary talents!  Use lots of setback dice!  Give him great armour, superior weapons and Adversary 3!  Go overboard on Brawn and Agility and make him the impossible killing machine.  Create an encounter that HAS to be solved by other means, making the BFG 9000 a sideshow novelty at best.
     
    Last but not least, use the despair to disable the weapon.  It runs out of ammo.  It gets jammed. etc.  Disable it for one, two or even three rounds.  Give the adversary a chance to do some real damage or make an epic escape.  That way you are not being called out as a ****, because you have not taken away the weapon.  What you have done is make the challenge an ACTUAL CHALLENGE.
     
    However, one PCs weapon should not be the centerpiece and focus of each combat.  It just makes it boring for everyone else.
     
    If nothing else, be a **** and take away the shiny.  If it is seriously derailing fun and challenge, it is no longer fun and challenging.  Even the player will get bored with the kill everything stick after a while, so just speed up the process.  If breaking the gun is breaking the game for the little whiner, then perhaps that person needs to find a different group to play with.  Tell them that.  Your weapon is so awesome.  So great, that you are sucking the fun out.  Don't break the weapon, but outfit an adversary with the SAME weapon.  Then kill the PC instead.  You're not a **** because you did not destroy the weapon.  Turn about is fair play.
  22. Like
    polyheadronman got a reaction from whafrog in Shopping and Destroying PC gear.   
    Nobody has touched on the big ******-y gun problem.
     
    You don't have to destroy the PCs gun.  I have a big game hunter with a +5 slugthrower of everything killing, and a BH/Assassin with a jetpack and a flame projector in the party.  When they start to do too much crazy, I have a few things I use to limit that.
     
    I like to put them very close and/or far away from the action when I can.  He invested in a long-range capable PC, so I shorten the distance.  It makes him duck for cover and squirm like a fish.  That way, I can put enemies within engaged, making his gun risky to use.  For the flame projector, keep the enemies far away.  That way, she has to risk getting close.
     
    I use dynamic battlefield elements to limit the swath of terror.  PCs are not the only ones who use cover, so I create terrain features and visual obstacles to cut off line of site.  That way, they can only take out one or two enemies before having to re-position.  Again, creating challenge and risk.  This also gives the rest of the group a chance to have an equal impact.
     
    Put them in situations where they are not allowed to carry their fave weapons.  A spaceport that enforces a hand gun only rule of law, or a settlement that abhors violence of any kind.  My PCs love their "signature" weapons like blank-ies.  Take their woobies away and watch how nervous they get.  That gives you opportunities as a GM to create encounters that force the group outside their comfort zones and thinking creatively.  It also has the effect of causing the players to diversify XP spending, so that they are better prepared to deal with adverse conditions next time.
     
    Use adversary talents!  Use lots of setback dice!  Give him great armour, superior weapons and Adversary 3!  Go overboard on Brawn and Agility and make him the impossible killing machine.  Create an encounter that HAS to be solved by other means, making the BFG 9000 a sideshow novelty at best.
     
    Last but not least, use the despair to disable the weapon.  It runs out of ammo.  It gets jammed. etc.  Disable it for one, two or even three rounds.  Give the adversary a chance to do some real damage or make an epic escape.  That way you are not being called out as a ****, because you have not taken away the weapon.  What you have done is make the challenge an ACTUAL CHALLENGE.
     
    However, one PCs weapon should not be the centerpiece and focus of each combat.  It just makes it boring for everyone else.
     
    If nothing else, be a **** and take away the shiny.  If it is seriously derailing fun and challenge, it is no longer fun and challenging.  Even the player will get bored with the kill everything stick after a while, so just speed up the process.  If breaking the gun is breaking the game for the little whiner, then perhaps that person needs to find a different group to play with.  Tell them that.  Your weapon is so awesome.  So great, that you are sucking the fun out.  Don't break the weapon, but outfit an adversary with the SAME weapon.  Then kill the PC instead.  You're not a **** because you did not destroy the weapon.  Turn about is fair play.
  23. Like
    polyheadronman got a reaction from cvtheoman in Shopping and Destroying PC gear.   
    Nobody has touched on the big ******-y gun problem.
     
    You don't have to destroy the PCs gun.  I have a big game hunter with a +5 slugthrower of everything killing, and a BH/Assassin with a jetpack and a flame projector in the party.  When they start to do too much crazy, I have a few things I use to limit that.
     
    I like to put them very close and/or far away from the action when I can.  He invested in a long-range capable PC, so I shorten the distance.  It makes him duck for cover and squirm like a fish.  That way, I can put enemies within engaged, making his gun risky to use.  For the flame projector, keep the enemies far away.  That way, she has to risk getting close.
     
    I use dynamic battlefield elements to limit the swath of terror.  PCs are not the only ones who use cover, so I create terrain features and visual obstacles to cut off line of site.  That way, they can only take out one or two enemies before having to re-position.  Again, creating challenge and risk.  This also gives the rest of the group a chance to have an equal impact.
     
    Put them in situations where they are not allowed to carry their fave weapons.  A spaceport that enforces a hand gun only rule of law, or a settlement that abhors violence of any kind.  My PCs love their "signature" weapons like blank-ies.  Take their woobies away and watch how nervous they get.  That gives you opportunities as a GM to create encounters that force the group outside their comfort zones and thinking creatively.  It also has the effect of causing the players to diversify XP spending, so that they are better prepared to deal with adverse conditions next time.
     
    Use adversary talents!  Use lots of setback dice!  Give him great armour, superior weapons and Adversary 3!  Go overboard on Brawn and Agility and make him the impossible killing machine.  Create an encounter that HAS to be solved by other means, making the BFG 9000 a sideshow novelty at best.
     
    Last but not least, use the despair to disable the weapon.  It runs out of ammo.  It gets jammed. etc.  Disable it for one, two or even three rounds.  Give the adversary a chance to do some real damage or make an epic escape.  That way you are not being called out as a ****, because you have not taken away the weapon.  What you have done is make the challenge an ACTUAL CHALLENGE.
     
    However, one PCs weapon should not be the centerpiece and focus of each combat.  It just makes it boring for everyone else.
     
    If nothing else, be a **** and take away the shiny.  If it is seriously derailing fun and challenge, it is no longer fun and challenging.  Even the player will get bored with the kill everything stick after a while, so just speed up the process.  If breaking the gun is breaking the game for the little whiner, then perhaps that person needs to find a different group to play with.  Tell them that.  Your weapon is so awesome.  So great, that you are sucking the fun out.  Don't break the weapon, but outfit an adversary with the SAME weapon.  Then kill the PC instead.  You're not a **** because you did not destroy the weapon.  Turn about is fair play.
  24. Like
    polyheadronman got a reaction from Ian2400 in Balancing combat with non-combat oriented PCs   
    Sounds like you are too focused on one thing: combat.  Make sure you have an encounter that works for the scholar, one for the pilot, etc.  A non-combat group should have non-combat encounters.
     
    in the meantime:
    Use minion groups liberally.  Either bunch them up into one skilled roll (say, against the Marauder), or break up the rolls into the lesser skilled base rolls.  Make sure the adversaries are doing things other than just shooting so that the group has a chance to turn the tide of battle without risking life and limb.  Dynamic battlefields that supply obvious tactical advantage to the group like terrain features, higher ground, gunnery emplacements make it fun, interesting and creative.
     
    Suggest ways to use the party's non-combat skills to effect.  Use Leadership to demoralize, knowledge to gain insight, piloting or computers to send machinery plowing into the enemy.
     
    Encourage your players to work within their limitations and think creatively.  That's when the fun begins...
  25. Like
    polyheadronman got a reaction from bradknowles in Balancing combat with non-combat oriented PCs   
    Sounds like you are too focused on one thing: combat.  Make sure you have an encounter that works for the scholar, one for the pilot, etc.  A non-combat group should have non-combat encounters.
     
    in the meantime:
    Use minion groups liberally.  Either bunch them up into one skilled roll (say, against the Marauder), or break up the rolls into the lesser skilled base rolls.  Make sure the adversaries are doing things other than just shooting so that the group has a chance to turn the tide of battle without risking life and limb.  Dynamic battlefields that supply obvious tactical advantage to the group like terrain features, higher ground, gunnery emplacements make it fun, interesting and creative.
     
    Suggest ways to use the party's non-combat skills to effect.  Use Leadership to demoralize, knowledge to gain insight, piloting or computers to send machinery plowing into the enemy.
     
    Encourage your players to work within their limitations and think creatively.  That's when the fun begins...
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