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archon007

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  1. I like to encourage my players in to being co-authors of the story we are telling. So I ask them lots of questions. After awhile the players get use to it and start answering before I even have to ask. How exactly do you do that? What does that look like? How does that happen? What are you trying to accomplish? What does success look like to you? What do you do? Can you describe what (your action) you are doing? How do you go about accomplishing that? How do you know that piece of information?
  2. This. I don't think despair takes away your success. I narrate it as either your flurry of shots hits your intended target and unfortunately your ally or your shot tears through your intended target and also hits your ally. Keep in mind combat isn't 6 second rounds like D&D. I often remind my players the combat is a sequence of exchanges of blows or fire. You might fire of several shots before having a clear line of fire at your target. You can narrate the despair as: As your wookie ally swings his vibroaxe at the stormtrooper sergeant you line up the perfect shot. Just as you squeeze the trigger the sergeant uses the wookie as a carpet shield absorbing several blaster bolts before your shots also strikes the sergeant in the chest and shoulder. Both take damage of X.
  3. Anyone else thought of adding "Activating Auto-fire triggers the weapons out of ammo condition". Sure you can fire off a lot of shots and damage but you better be stocked with Extra Reloads. Makes it powerful but the player has to use it sparingly because they are using up a resource and spending their maneuver to reload.
  4. I think the biggest issue is the Gm not knowing what failure looks like ahead of time. Which can lead to a lot of issues and a lot of unneeded rolls. In the climbing example. If they are using a ladder, failure could mean no progress. If the are climbing up the ladder trying not to make noise, failure could mean they made noise. If they are climbing a wet slippery mountain ledge failure could mean they lose their grip and fall. Honestly, failure can really mean anything, but what's most important is that the GM and players know what base success and failure looks like before a roll is made. If failure of a roll doesn't have a clear consequence or isn't fun and exciting there is no need to call for a roll. As to the original question. No Success and No Failures = no success, a failure. It's the same as if the roll came up 1 failure and 0 successes.
  5. I think the biggest issue is the Gm not knowing what failure looks like ahead of time. Which can lead to a lot of issues and a lot of unneeded rolls. In the climbing example. If they are using a ladder, failure could mean no progress. If the are climbing up the ladder trying not to make noise, failure could mean they made noise. If they are climbing a wet slippery mountain ledge failure could mean they lose their grip and fall. Honestly, failure can really mean anything, but what's most important is that the GM and players know what base success and failure looks like before a roll is made. If failure of a roll doesn't have a clear consequence or isn't fun and exciting there is no need to call for a roll. As to the original question. No Success and No Failures = no success, a failure. It's the same as if the roll came up 1 failure and 0 successes.
  6. http://starwars.wikia.com/wiki/Lightsaber_crystal
  7. You can allow canceling of Triumph & Despair that's the easiest fx.
  8. The first thing I would recommend is take a deep breathe. Second, talk to your group. There is nothing worse than feeling this way then spend a bunch of time creating a campaign that no one wants to play. Just sit down with them and ask them what type of game they want to play. They might surprise you and give you all the ideas and inspiration you need.
  9. I don't like this because it should be the GM that makes the consequences for the players actions. I would suggest if your players have issues playing moral "good" characters then either you as the GM aren't making the world around them have consequences for those actions or maybe they want to play a different game than you are running. Maybe they want to play a darkside campaign?
  10. Generally it's impossible to make written rules that can recreate iconic movie fights. If you are trying to do this by making your own iconic fight you don't need rules you tailor the encounter accordingly. The easiest way to do this is give a high soak value and and defense armor and talents. The system as written can do the job with some tweaking. Some iconic just can't be made with a rule system, but as the GM you can tweak the system to create that type of encounter.
  11. but that 1/3 chance of a failure could mean a 8 damage blaster not hitting at all so that's an effective soak of 8 instead of 1.
  12. If you watched Star Wars Clone Wars or Rebels you see the dark underbelly of Coruscant. There is no perfect society without an underbelly of crime.
  13. I've always done Vigilance vs Stealth to see if the ambushers are noticed and used threat to give setback to the ambushees initiative. If the ambushee wins the check they see the ambusher even though they still might have cover, etc and roll standard initiative.
  14. I think you have to accept the system is an adjustment for you and the players. When I first started I had a few players that loved it, some that where so-so and 1 regular player quit over the system. It also seems there might be some "trust" issues and rule lawyering from your players. This isn't the best system if the players think the GM is out to get them. I only mention this because you said you had to argue about the dud grenade.
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