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Doughnut

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  1. Like
    Doughnut got a reaction from ZorinIchiona in Distinct gameplay?   
    I have been thinking in my brain meat what settings to run in Genesys. I've been working on a bunch of disparate setting projects. And I've been wondering, how to make different settings *feel* different? One of the problems I've encountered in the past with universal toolkit systems is that they end up feeling like the same game over and over. I had this problem when playing and then running Fate, after a while it didn't matter what setting we were playing, it just felt like Fate. Genesys I think has an advantage in this case in that the heavy focus of the narrative over everything coming down to a pass/fail roll.
    I am working on a cyberpunk setting, a weird west setting, and a fantasyland setting, and I can't shake the feeling that these games will end up feeling the same in play even though they have different settings, and tones.
    Also, I was considering an idea I've seen around a lot: a Cyberpunk world, and Fantasy MMORPG like //.hack or Sword Art Online. I endeavor to run this type of game one day, but over time I have considered running different systems for the different worlds. A more narrative, and deadly real world analog system for the Cyberpunk world, and a high fantasy rpg system for the MMORPG video game. The only thing I can think is to run a horror tone using fear mechanics in the real world with more social encounters. And run the MMORPG as more high fantasy hack and slash lots of combat, encounters.
    But again, if I wish to use Genesys for both the real world and the video game world of this setting how to make the different game modes feel distinct from one another? 
  2. Confused
    Doughnut got a reaction from DurosSpacer in Loot Table   
    For generating credits randomly found on bodies and such, I use my tried and true d%. I've used this method for years. You roll the 2d10 for %. I roll my d% the ten's place dice if 5 or less it's x10, if 6+ it's x100. Then the second dice is the number to multiply. So if I roll a 23 on my %, the tens place is 5 or less, so it's x10, and my ones place is 3, so I multiply 3x10: 30 credits. If I roll a 77, then it's 700 credits. This method allows for numbers 10-90 by tens, then 100-900 by hundreds, I also use 00 as 1000.
  3. Confused
    Doughnut got a reaction from Lord_Lele in Star Trek as a Setting   
    Yup! I gave up trying to run Genesys because it's too much work to convert entire settings,  and when I presented the idea to my players after a mock battle to show how the dice system worked they complained that it took too long to tabulate the dice, I suggested a roller app, but they didn't want to burn their phone battery at the table. As a GM there's just not enough material available without building most of it from the ground up to really dive head first into a setting as deep as Star Trek. Instead I ran my Star Trek campaign in Fate Accelerated/Core, and we had an amazing time! We're currently on an end of Season break from Star Trek, scheduled to resume for Season 2 in the spring.
  4. Like
    Doughnut got a reaction from drainsmith in Star Trek as a Setting   
    I am setting up a Star Trek Genesys game also. I am basing a lot of the gear choices off of Star Trek Adventures, because I want to run a Star Trek Adventures game, but I hate the Modiphius' 2d20 system. I am basing the weapons off of various gear from the Genesys sample settings. Like a Phaser type-1 is simply a laser pistol from the Science Fiction setting example, and I added a Stun setting
    Gear in Star Trek probably should be downplayed especially as rewards since in modern Trek nearly everything can be replicated, so all common gear should be 100% available as long as the characters have access to a replicator. Restricted gear like Romulan Ale or a Dominion plasma rifle could be used as motivators for gear. Combat probably should be downplayed a lot too since Star Trek combat (remakes, and Discovery notwithstanding) in most Star Trek battles even when the enemies start shooting at the officers, they stop and try to talk instead of shooting until the enemies are all dead.
    My campaign is also post-Voyager so I am adding in the option for players to play freed borg drones (based off of biodroids in the cyberpunk example), and toying with the idea of adding holographic crew members with mobile emitters (basically robots from sci-fi but without wounds, only strain). Otherwise most of the rules can be lifted from the existing sci-fi setting example, space opera setting example, and ship rules.
  5. Like
    Doughnut got a reaction from Erahard in Star Trek as a Setting   
    I am setting up a Star Trek Genesys game also. I am basing a lot of the gear choices off of Star Trek Adventures, because I want to run a Star Trek Adventures game, but I hate the Modiphius' 2d20 system. I am basing the weapons off of various gear from the Genesys sample settings. Like a Phaser type-1 is simply a laser pistol from the Science Fiction setting example, and I added a Stun setting
    Gear in Star Trek probably should be downplayed especially as rewards since in modern Trek nearly everything can be replicated, so all common gear should be 100% available as long as the characters have access to a replicator. Restricted gear like Romulan Ale or a Dominion plasma rifle could be used as motivators for gear. Combat probably should be downplayed a lot too since Star Trek combat (remakes, and Discovery notwithstanding) in most Star Trek battles even when the enemies start shooting at the officers, they stop and try to talk instead of shooting until the enemies are all dead.
    My campaign is also post-Voyager so I am adding in the option for players to play freed borg drones (based off of biodroids in the cyberpunk example), and toying with the idea of adding holographic crew members with mobile emitters (basically robots from sci-fi but without wounds, only strain). Otherwise most of the rules can be lifted from the existing sci-fi setting example, space opera setting example, and ship rules.
  6. Like
    Doughnut got a reaction from Daeglan in Transhuman Genesys   
    Transhumanism is an interesting setting idea because it divorces people from things like bodies and asks "what makes us human?" I would use archetypes to determine the base character of a person, and use sleeves as 'vehicles'. Vehicles would match the mechanics, imo to sleeving a bit better. I'd probably make a Tone rule saying that characters only have a strain threshold, no wound threshold. Then I'd toy with dropping the system strain from vehicles, and use the character's strain in place. Sleeves would be vehicles, so use hull trama for wound threshold instead of a character's.
  7. Like
    Doughnut got a reaction from c__beck in Fantasy Knowledge Skils?   
    While it's not grouped up under knowledges, isn't Streetwise already its own kind of special knowledge skill? I have added an arcane knowledge skill to represent knowledge of magics and other mystical things, using the modern definition of 'arcane'. I like Lore and Education as subdivisions of knowledge. I consider wilderness information and training under the survival skill.
     
    Just my 2 cp.
  8. Like
    Doughnut got a reaction from Rebelarch86 in House rules?   
    That's fair. It's not for everyone. I see house ruling as a way to customizing to your group.
  9. Like
    Doughnut reacted to jmoschner in Modelling Invulnerability   
    You might consider having them take strain instead of wounds from non-silver attacks (after soak, etc. is applied). Just make sure to always track strain for the NPCs.
    Or just deal with it narratively.
  10. Like
    Doughnut reacted to Fogemort in Magic Spell Types vs. Magic Spells   
    FWIW, I was thinking of using a hybrid system...
    There are both "fixed" spells and "free form" spells. Fixed spells have a limited effect and cannot be modified, but can be cast at one difficultly less than a similar free-form spell. Free form spells work as per the book. A spell caster can memorize some number of fixed spells per day based on skill and/or stat. The caster would have a spell book and would have to find or research spells to add to it, hopefully providing additional motivations to adventure.
    Using this system, "Magic Missile" would be an attack spell with a medium range that does 1 wound for each success. It is cast at easy difficulty and costs two strain. And that's it. The spell caster cannot increase the range or add effects or additional targets, but they can spend advantage in normal ways. If they wanted to free form an attack spell that included burn, they would have to free form cast it and it would have normal (i.e., rules as written) difficulty.
  11. Like
    Doughnut reacted to Khaalis in Magic Spell Types vs. Magic Spells   
    Personally I agree with the idea of limiting the spells to more specific versions of the parent power. That said, I'd provide for a lot more spell knowledge depending on the setting.
    I'm thinking Spells Known should be based on a combination of the magic knowledge skill (Lore on the GenCon sheet) and the governing Characteristic.  So a Wizard might know [INT Rating + LORE Ranks] spells. If you really have a lot of spells in the system maybe Double that. Obviously this could be tweaked for different styles of casters such as differentiating a Wizard from a Sorcerer (to use D&D terms). [EDIT] For sorcerer I might go with the more true freeform, but limited to Lore in Base Powers.
    Perhaps you could make it so you know INT in base spells powers (Attack, etc.) and LORE ranks in specific "spells" from that base power. You could also make each Base Power type its own casting skill and then you know Lore in "spells" from that power.  (As I see Magic skill as your pure ability to draw in and form the magic (aka casting) and the Lore skill as your general knowledge of the magic.)
    I'd create the spells so that their difficulty denoted their rank. So an Average spell requires 2 Ranks in the spellcasting skill. Create talents that allow you to reduce difficulties in certain conditions or on certain spells so you can technically cast spells higher than Difficulty 5. For instance add spellcasting characteristic to skill rank to determine maximum difficulties castable.
    As an example, take Harry Dresden or Harry Potter. Both of their spells are specific lists of specific effects. For instance Dresden doesn't have the Attack spell that he mods on the fly to do whatever he wants. Instead he has spells like Fuego, Flammamurus, Forzare, etc. However, with Dresden he has a LOT of known spells. The equivalent from Potterverse would be Hermione who also has a walking encyclopedic knowledge of spells. Harry not so much, but he can out cast her in pure power (aka Casting vs Lore).
    Anyway, just a few thoughts off the top of my head.
  12. Like
    Doughnut got a reaction from ZorinIchiona in Magic Spell Types vs. Magic Spells   
    I've been thinking about magic in Genesys a lot lately. Noodling beyond al dente on the subject. I think I've finally resolved how I am going to run magic, and I feel like the intent of the system proposes magic, and I gain that insight from the Gencon Genesys characters. Shoutout to Silverfox for the thread:
    I look at Leoric and look at his spells. He has actual spells like you'd expect to see in D&D. He doesn't just use Magic type: Attack he has "Arcane Spear" which is based on the Attack magic type of course. But he also has "Imbued Strike" a completely different spell, but still based on the Magic Type: Attack.
    The posts I've seen around about how to make magic feel more like other RPGs, I feel, is to follow this path.
    My proposal: make individual spells, with their own flavor and trappings, stealing trappings from Savage Worlds, of course. With this kind of customization you can determine, on a spell by spell basis what spells are available to which skills, not only that but you can restrict which additional effects may be available to specific spells, don't think a "Fireball" should be able to add the Ice Effect? No problem! Maybe Fireball doesn't get additional effects, it's just an attack with blast and deadly. Adding limitations like this could be a good reason to reduce the difficulty of the action by 1 difficulty, without changing the strain cost. Another complaint I've seen around is that it doesn't make 100% sense that heal is only a divine or primal magic type. What about a spell like 'Life Drain' that is traditionally an arcane spell that damages a target, but also heals the caster? It might look something like:
     
    Also, imposing a limit to how many spells a character can learn, may also help those who feel like the magic system is far too broad and open, like myself. Perhaps a limit like 'Spellcasters learn spells equal their Magic Skill rank.' That way they learn new spells when they gain a Skill Rank. Or 'Spellcasters learn spells equal to their Characteristic linked to their magic skill' so they'll probably learn more spells sooner, but then only gain more spells when their characteristic goes up. I'll also probably make a Talent like: Learn Spell. And even with the talent a caster at most will only learn 10 spells total, making casters pick and choose the spells they really want.
     
    This can help differentiate between spells, that way Telekinesis, Transmutation, and Detect Magic aren't all a single Utility spell roll, and feel like distinct spells.
     
    Overall I am pretty confident about this sort of limited spell based magic system from a roleplaying point of view as well as the intention of the Genesys magic design. But what do you think?
  13. Like
    Doughnut got a reaction from Richardbuxton in Musings on Magic and Monetization.   
    Spells cost 2 strain to cast, successful or not. Although the probabilities to generate enough advantage to recover that strain from the spell roll itself have pretty good odds. Even a starting character with say 3 Intellect and 1 Arcana has a 24% chance to generate at least 2 Advantage while casting the Attack spell with one modification. Of course the spell caster needs to choose whether or not to activate their Additional Effects with those advantage or recover the strain they spent on the spell, a risk reward scenario to be sure. But with a 65% chance for the spell to be successful I guess it depends on whether or not you succeed casting the attack spell to determine whether or not you wish to activate the additional effects.
    It's already been confirmed to players that Additional Effects on magic like Blast, works just like the item quality of the same name, so you'd need 2 advantage to activate it.
    The Anydice program with Genesys dice programmed in. Shout outs to CitizenKeen
     
    In my case it's my wish to align the PC's expectations more to the style of game where magic isn't the end all be all of all skill checks, because I can definitely see my group all doubling down on magic, then the whole campaign just becomes about "I cast the attack spell, I'll add blast" then next round "I cast the attack spell, I'll add range" then next round "I cast the attack spell, I'll add impact". Because that's the sort of gamers my friends are. So if I adjudicate the magic system to be something a little more limited, something more in line with the Genesys Gencon mage character spells (seriously, that character has two magic attack spells clearly defined based on the magic attack action), then my players will use it to narrate what their doing instead of just repeating that they are using the attack spell every round with various modifiers. Or my friends will argue "I narrated that my magic attack spell is a fire spell, it should catch things on fire." even if they didn't add the fire descriptor to the spell, and narratively it should catch things on fire even without the extra difficulty, because we are more used to full narrative systems where if you say a magic attack is fire based then it catches something on fire.
    Not to mention I enjoy writing spells and powers then trying to figure out how to build them in the confines of a rule system or toolkit.
  14. Like
    Doughnut got a reaction from Richardbuxton in Musings on Magic and Monetization.   
    As the GM of my group I think wall of fire should be as at will as fireball. Personally, I'd adjudicate that you can combine spell actions, maybe with an upgraded difficulty. Transforming a difficulty to a challenge die seems appropriate to be able to combine the attack and barrier magic actions. That way the barrier can do damage to anyone touching it. Not simply cause a burn, but actually be a persistent, concentrated wall of fire that if people move within short range of it take fire damage.
    Of course wall of fire is just an example, it could be a wall of thorns, for primal casters, or a wall of holy light for divine casters, but it could all be the same process. At least that's along the lines I am thinking of running it. Since I know it's going to come up in my game.
  15. Like
    Doughnut got a reaction from Forgottenlore in Magic Spell Types vs. Magic Spells   
    I've been thinking about magic in Genesys a lot lately. Noodling beyond al dente on the subject. I think I've finally resolved how I am going to run magic, and I feel like the intent of the system proposes magic, and I gain that insight from the Gencon Genesys characters. Shoutout to Silverfox for the thread:
    I look at Leoric and look at his spells. He has actual spells like you'd expect to see in D&D. He doesn't just use Magic type: Attack he has "Arcane Spear" which is based on the Attack magic type of course. But he also has "Imbued Strike" a completely different spell, but still based on the Magic Type: Attack.
    The posts I've seen around about how to make magic feel more like other RPGs, I feel, is to follow this path.
    My proposal: make individual spells, with their own flavor and trappings, stealing trappings from Savage Worlds, of course. With this kind of customization you can determine, on a spell by spell basis what spells are available to which skills, not only that but you can restrict which additional effects may be available to specific spells, don't think a "Fireball" should be able to add the Ice Effect? No problem! Maybe Fireball doesn't get additional effects, it's just an attack with blast and deadly. Adding limitations like this could be a good reason to reduce the difficulty of the action by 1 difficulty, without changing the strain cost. Another complaint I've seen around is that it doesn't make 100% sense that heal is only a divine or primal magic type. What about a spell like 'Life Drain' that is traditionally an arcane spell that damages a target, but also heals the caster? It might look something like:
     
    Also, imposing a limit to how many spells a character can learn, may also help those who feel like the magic system is far too broad and open, like myself. Perhaps a limit like 'Spellcasters learn spells equal their Magic Skill rank.' That way they learn new spells when they gain a Skill Rank. Or 'Spellcasters learn spells equal to their Characteristic linked to their magic skill' so they'll probably learn more spells sooner, but then only gain more spells when their characteristic goes up. I'll also probably make a Talent like: Learn Spell. And even with the talent a caster at most will only learn 10 spells total, making casters pick and choose the spells they really want.
     
    This can help differentiate between spells, that way Telekinesis, Transmutation, and Detect Magic aren't all a single Utility spell roll, and feel like distinct spells.
     
    Overall I am pretty confident about this sort of limited spell based magic system from a roleplaying point of view as well as the intention of the Genesys magic design. But what do you think?
  16. Like
    Doughnut reacted to lordannoyed in Distinct gameplay?   
    Dialogue definitely.   If you are working on a particular setting that has an established world, really try to incorporate what they say in that world.  If you are making something up, try to figure out how the people sound like and what makes them distinct.  Ya know who does this really well with games is Blizzard.  Love them or hate them, they establish certain phrases as battle cries and right before an intense moment you will see main characters use those lines.  I swear every time they do that it suckers me in.
    Determine if your characters have accents.
    What is their education level and how does that influence how they speak?  I'm currently playing a "Mad" scientist in Star Wars.  My character is not prone to action, he stops and thinks about everything around him, drawing in as much info as he can before acting.  His speech is slightly arrogant, bc he feels his intelligence makes him better than others and he doesn't ever use contractions in speech.
    Sometimes making something feel more real involves thinking of how the character you have interacting with the PC's is different from them.  Is he English?  Have him drop a "Cheers governor!"  Or a "There's a good chap."  Is he a reptile and the others are mammals?  Have him mention something subtly about that like "Wow, even new hatchlings handle that better than you."  Doesn't have to be every line, but once in awhile will rope them in.
  17. Like
    Doughnut got a reaction from SwivelDiscourse in Magic Spell Types vs. Magic Spells   
    I've been thinking about magic in Genesys a lot lately. Noodling beyond al dente on the subject. I think I've finally resolved how I am going to run magic, and I feel like the intent of the system proposes magic, and I gain that insight from the Gencon Genesys characters. Shoutout to Silverfox for the thread:
    I look at Leoric and look at his spells. He has actual spells like you'd expect to see in D&D. He doesn't just use Magic type: Attack he has "Arcane Spear" which is based on the Attack magic type of course. But he also has "Imbued Strike" a completely different spell, but still based on the Magic Type: Attack.
    The posts I've seen around about how to make magic feel more like other RPGs, I feel, is to follow this path.
    My proposal: make individual spells, with their own flavor and trappings, stealing trappings from Savage Worlds, of course. With this kind of customization you can determine, on a spell by spell basis what spells are available to which skills, not only that but you can restrict which additional effects may be available to specific spells, don't think a "Fireball" should be able to add the Ice Effect? No problem! Maybe Fireball doesn't get additional effects, it's just an attack with blast and deadly. Adding limitations like this could be a good reason to reduce the difficulty of the action by 1 difficulty, without changing the strain cost. Another complaint I've seen around is that it doesn't make 100% sense that heal is only a divine or primal magic type. What about a spell like 'Life Drain' that is traditionally an arcane spell that damages a target, but also heals the caster? It might look something like:
     
    Also, imposing a limit to how many spells a character can learn, may also help those who feel like the magic system is far too broad and open, like myself. Perhaps a limit like 'Spellcasters learn spells equal their Magic Skill rank.' That way they learn new spells when they gain a Skill Rank. Or 'Spellcasters learn spells equal to their Characteristic linked to their magic skill' so they'll probably learn more spells sooner, but then only gain more spells when their characteristic goes up. I'll also probably make a Talent like: Learn Spell. And even with the talent a caster at most will only learn 10 spells total, making casters pick and choose the spells they really want.
     
    This can help differentiate between spells, that way Telekinesis, Transmutation, and Detect Magic aren't all a single Utility spell roll, and feel like distinct spells.
     
    Overall I am pretty confident about this sort of limited spell based magic system from a roleplaying point of view as well as the intention of the Genesys magic design. But what do you think?
  18. Like
    Doughnut got a reaction from lbwoodard in Magic skills and characteristics   
    I've been thinking about ways I want to use magic skills in a setting I am working on. But I wanted to run this idea by the community noodlers. 
    Summary: different characteristics for different spells. 
    One of the biggest complaint about magic that I've seen about magic is that it's too broad. You can do nearly anything with a simple magic skill check. The CRB considers this, and offers suggestions to make higher difficulties for magic skill checks. 
    Working this problem through my brain I realized I don't like the idea of an Arcana skill user dumping everything into Intellect and then being a superhero capable of doing everything under the sun with an Arcana (Intellect) skill check. 
    My theoretical solution: different spells use different characteristics! Boom, nailed it. This will not only resolve my issue with casters being a one characteristic pony, but also force some interesting roleplaying narrative because the caster uses different characteristics for different ways of casting magic spells. 
    I can even use different characteristics for different spells for different skills.
    I posted this idea to a comment on reddit, but it's a good example.
    Say you're making an Avatar the Last Airbender/Legend of Korra type game. Bending is manipulation of elements through magic. For this game you might create the four elements (or more) as skills. Now, using the idea to change characteristics based on what spells you are using with those skills can definitely change the flavor of the casters and the skills as a whole. Earth bending skill that uses Brawn to cast the attack spell, but Willpower to cast the Barrier spell. Or Air bending skill that uses Agility for the Attack spell and Cunning for the Barrier spell. And so on. 
    Personally, I think I am going to develop this idea a bit further in my setting because I really like the versatility of magic, but I don't like the idea of making magic of a certain type all linked to the same characteristic. This simply reinforces the D&D-like fantasy tropes of the squish caster. I want my casters to be diverse, even the same skill using casters. I don't want all the wizards in my setting to be super smart and then have minor bonuses in another characteristic or two. 
    My setting is definitely going to use a type of magic called shadow magic. I can envision the Attack spell using Presence; a Shadow mage attacks outward with their inner force of personality, but Barrier might use something like Cunning, Shadow mages use deviousness to create barriers of darkness that obscure or confuse the opponents. 
    If I add an Elementalist magical tradition skill,  the Attack spell characteristic may be cunning for the ability to weave power into a damaging force through creativity, sort of like Green Lantern powers making elemental shaped constructs to lash out at enemies. Then an elementalist may use Agility to cast the Barrier spell, I can imagine the elementalist is waving their arms around producing a fire shield or a wall of air, and they need to move their arms quickly for the construct to keep the shape. 
    Religion is a central theme to my setting that I am creating. Perhaps the Attack spell will use Brawn for the Faith magic skill, the pious mages channel their divine might straight through their physical body, and their body must withstand the divine energy. Barrier might be the religious caster's characteristic that represent ls their faith: willpower, the divine shield is only as strong as the character's faith in their deity. 
    These are just some quick and dirty examples. Nothing is set in stone even for my campaign, and I definitely will be fiddling with this concept a lot more before the group sits down to play. 
    I am really happy with this idea though because then even casters of the same type, who use the same skill might focus on completely different characteristics, and thus be vastly different characters, but still are able to use the same kind of magic. A Paladin might focus more on Brawn to use that Faith skill Attack spell, as well as be a big beefy soldier type, than a Priest who spends more on Willpower or whatever I set the characteristic for the Heal spell, but they both still use the same magic skill.
     
    What do ye think? Usable? Flawed? Let me know! 
  19. Like
    Doughnut got a reaction from TheGMSource in Magic skills and characteristics   
    I've been thinking about ways I want to use magic skills in a setting I am working on. But I wanted to run this idea by the community noodlers. 
    Summary: different characteristics for different spells. 
    One of the biggest complaint about magic that I've seen about magic is that it's too broad. You can do nearly anything with a simple magic skill check. The CRB considers this, and offers suggestions to make higher difficulties for magic skill checks. 
    Working this problem through my brain I realized I don't like the idea of an Arcana skill user dumping everything into Intellect and then being a superhero capable of doing everything under the sun with an Arcana (Intellect) skill check. 
    My theoretical solution: different spells use different characteristics! Boom, nailed it. This will not only resolve my issue with casters being a one characteristic pony, but also force some interesting roleplaying narrative because the caster uses different characteristics for different ways of casting magic spells. 
    I can even use different characteristics for different spells for different skills.
    I posted this idea to a comment on reddit, but it's a good example.
    Say you're making an Avatar the Last Airbender/Legend of Korra type game. Bending is manipulation of elements through magic. For this game you might create the four elements (or more) as skills. Now, using the idea to change characteristics based on what spells you are using with those skills can definitely change the flavor of the casters and the skills as a whole. Earth bending skill that uses Brawn to cast the attack spell, but Willpower to cast the Barrier spell. Or Air bending skill that uses Agility for the Attack spell and Cunning for the Barrier spell. And so on. 
    Personally, I think I am going to develop this idea a bit further in my setting because I really like the versatility of magic, but I don't like the idea of making magic of a certain type all linked to the same characteristic. This simply reinforces the D&D-like fantasy tropes of the squish caster. I want my casters to be diverse, even the same skill using casters. I don't want all the wizards in my setting to be super smart and then have minor bonuses in another characteristic or two. 
    My setting is definitely going to use a type of magic called shadow magic. I can envision the Attack spell using Presence; a Shadow mage attacks outward with their inner force of personality, but Barrier might use something like Cunning, Shadow mages use deviousness to create barriers of darkness that obscure or confuse the opponents. 
    If I add an Elementalist magical tradition skill,  the Attack spell characteristic may be cunning for the ability to weave power into a damaging force through creativity, sort of like Green Lantern powers making elemental shaped constructs to lash out at enemies. Then an elementalist may use Agility to cast the Barrier spell, I can imagine the elementalist is waving their arms around producing a fire shield or a wall of air, and they need to move their arms quickly for the construct to keep the shape. 
    Religion is a central theme to my setting that I am creating. Perhaps the Attack spell will use Brawn for the Faith magic skill, the pious mages channel their divine might straight through their physical body, and their body must withstand the divine energy. Barrier might be the religious caster's characteristic that represent ls their faith: willpower, the divine shield is only as strong as the character's faith in their deity. 
    These are just some quick and dirty examples. Nothing is set in stone even for my campaign, and I definitely will be fiddling with this concept a lot more before the group sits down to play. 
    I am really happy with this idea though because then even casters of the same type, who use the same skill might focus on completely different characteristics, and thus be vastly different characters, but still are able to use the same kind of magic. A Paladin might focus more on Brawn to use that Faith skill Attack spell, as well as be a big beefy soldier type, than a Priest who spends more on Willpower or whatever I set the characteristic for the Heal spell, but they both still use the same magic skill.
     
    What do ye think? Usable? Flawed? Let me know! 
  20. Like
    Doughnut reacted to Nohwear in It's been three weeks, FFG   
    This game has a lot of potential, but it will flounder with out support.
  21. Like
    Doughnut got a reaction from widomknight in Malifaux Setting with genesys?   
    Very.
    The genre of Malifaux is weird west/steampunk-y with focus on neutral/neutral evil factions vying for control over resources.
    The tone is weird horror, but where CoC is cosmic/existential horror tone. Malifaux is far more 'down to Earth' as it were. In CoC humanity are playthings, or insects in the grand cosmic scheme. In Malifaux humanity is one of the larger threats the setting face, in fact some would argue that the various human factions are the antagonists of the setting. There are body horror tones, and things that bump in the night in Malifaux, but the things that go bump in the night take a vested interest in humanity, and humanity does the same to those things that bump in the night. The things that bump in the night are not unknowable cosmic entities; they're often definable creatures which are analogues to animals in the Malifaux dimension.
     
    A very brief Malifaux backstory: Humanity found a way to portal into a horror dimension where they mined some rocks called soul stones that are used for magic. The human factions set up a city on the other-side of the portal called "Malifaux". Various factions of humans are trying to gain control of the city and thus the mining of the soul stones, while fighting the denizens of the other dimension that look like monsters, demons, goblins, etc. Because power for power sake and all that.
  22. Like
    Doughnut got a reaction from DarthDude in How to handle immunities, resistances, and vulnerabilities to different damage types?   
    Roleplaying games have a long history of specific damage types being more or less effective against different creatures.
    I understand the narrative nature of the Genesys system eschewing many of these fiddly bits for the sake of simplicity, however damage types and immunity/resistance/vulnerability is still part of many genres: Skeletons are resistant to piercing damage, undead are vulnerable to a divine/holy elemental. Elemental creatures made from, thus immune, to one type of energy, while completely wrecked by its opposite.
    Fellow GMs and setting creators, how will you, if you plan to, handle this?
     
    I have some ideas of how I plan on handling this.
    Current D&D has a good approach on damage. Loosely define some damage types, and then there are four states of damage variation: Immune, take no damage from that damage type. Resistant, take half damage (probably round down) from that damage type. Vulnerable, take double damage from that damage type. Null state, damage is applied normally. I can see myself using this approach since it's intuitive and requires very little bookkeeping on my part, other than knowing what damage a type is and whether or not the target has any sort of modifier against it.
    Another way, instead of damage x0, x½, or x2, could grant additional defense or soak vs. a damage type. In a Modern setting where things like Bulletproof vests, or even Firefighter gear could easily represent a damage resistance to certain types of damage. A firefighter in full firefighter gear might have an additional soak against fire damage. So when they charge into a burning building to save someone they'd be more protected against fire specifically, but wouldn't be any more or less protected than normal against the rubble falling on them.
  23. Like
    Doughnut reacted to c__beck in How to handle immunities, resistances, and vulnerabilities to different damage types?   
    What I would suggest is to play around with soak.
    Vulnerability decreases soak by 3. Resistance increases soak by 3. Immunity means you ignore that damage type.
    I went with 3 because it's the high end of the suggested soak bonus for armour.
    Or, if you prefer a bit more dice rolling, have vulnerability add 2 boost dice to the attack, and resistance add 2 setback dice. This treats it more like defence. See page 198 for why defence is better than a set soak bonus; apply the reverse to vulnerability.
  24. Like
    Doughnut reacted to DarthGM in How to handle immunities, resistances, and vulnerabilities to different damage types?   
    If a creature is vulnerable to something, like silver, maybe you could apply Breach 1 to any attack made against it with a silver weapon.
  25. Like
    Doughnut got a reaction from Grimmerling in Magic Talents   
    There are a couple of force talents I translated to magic talents from EotE, AoR, and F&D:
     
    Quick Cast (Tier 5, Incidental) Once per session, the spellcaster character may suffer 2 strain to perform a magic action check as a maneuver (in addition to the 2 strain normally spent to make a magic action check). 
    Quick Cast is a copy of The Force is My Ally.
     
    Opportunity Spell (Tier 5, Maneuver) Whenever the spellcaster character misses an opponent with a combat check and generates 1 triumph or 3 advantage the character may spend this to perform a magic action check that targets one or more allies as a maneuver (they still must be able to perform maneuvers, and may not perform more than two maneuvers in a turn.)
    Opportunity Spell is a copy of Unity Assault
     
    Warmage (Tier 5, Passive) Upon missing an opponent with a combat check the character may spend 1 Triumph or 3 Advantage to perform a magic action check as a maneuver this turn (the character must still be able to perform maneuvers, and still may not perform more than two maneuvers in a turn.)
    Warmage is a copy of Force Assault
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