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enentol

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Everything posted by enentol

  1. At this point, it would just be really nice to have an announcement of ANYTHING. Enemies Within came out 3 months ago now. Any book takes at least 3-6 months after being anounced to hit the shelves. So that means that it's going to be a roughly 6-9 month gap until the next supplement. Considering this is the only 40k RPG currently even receiving new material, let's hope for an announcement soon! (Fingers crossed for Enemies Without)
  2. 1. I've prepared all of Forgotten Gods and have so far run my party through the first third. It's got a great set-up and has been a lot of fun so far. 2. It follows the same story from the core book adventure and GM Kit, but in my opinion, it's written better. I feel that Dark Pursuits (Core Rulebook) is pretty crucial to read/play through to get a good grip on the themes, starting locale, and some of the characters of Forgotten Gods. The amount of background it sets is important and Forgotten Gods has a lot of call backs. The GM Kit Adventure, Desolation of the Dead, isn't as important, but I did use it to flesh out the short Gallowsway portion of Forgotten Gods. Having details on the locations is helpful, but most of Desolation's plot can be forgotten. I left Desolation out of my campaign, as it feels a bit disjointed compared to the rest. However, I do plan on revisiting and tweaking it as a sort of "cleaning-up loose ends" epilogue. 3. So far, for just the first 1/3 , my group has taken 3 sessions. So roughly 9-10 hours. Over all, it depends how many of the optional encounters you want to put in, but I would estimate at least 30 hours/10 sessions of content. MINIMUM. You could probably stretch this out to 12-15 sessions. 4. It's a solid mix of all three, combat/investigation/roleplay. Very balanced in its approach, with great set pieces in each part. From the book, the first part is probably more investigation/roleplay focused, the second part has some great opportunities for unique roleplay, and the final part looks to be roleplay/combat. Once again, they're balanced pretty well with combat/roleplay/investigation scattered throughout. 5. The amount of information for Thaur and the Oath Unspoken is actually quite impressive. I feel like there is definitely more than enough information and ideas to do multiple adventures in either location. Even the extra information on Desoleum is good. When combined with the Core Rulebook and GM Kit, the information on Hive Desoleum and the surrounding wastes is quite comprehensive. There's plenty of ideas for NPCs and encounters that could work in any adventure/campaign and some neat rules for things like enivronmental/damage effects of combat aboard voidships (or tunnels, or sewers, etc.). Lastly, having looked at them, the new homeworld "options" are quite minor, and more just like little tweaks to the Hive World and Voidborn homeworlds. Still, they're appreciated. 6. There's a decent mix of enemies, but mostly you'll be fighting humans/cultists. It borrows a lot of NPC stats from the main rulebook but has some interesting stuff thrown into the mix. Just don't be affraid to make some changes to stats if the profiles don't match what you have in mind. 7. All around, even if you don't plan on running the adventure, Forgotten Gods has great art, tons of information about the locales, characters, cultures, and organizations. Essentially, Forgotten Gods has a fun adventure and so much content that I wouldn't feel comfortable cramming it all into the story arc. Great stuff to borrow and use for a multitude of things. Overall, it seems like a great book. my players are definitely hooked. From a GM perspective, there is definitely a bit of work to put in to make it a smooth experience, but it really does seem like a lot of fun. I definitely felt that it's going to be a lot more fun than some of the other pre-made adventures. In my opinion, as a GM who plans to run this adventure and then create new adventures on Desoleum, it was definitely worth my $40.
  3. I've read through both previous adventures and I've run Dark Pursuits leading into Forgotten Gods. I feel that Dark Pursuits is pretty crucial to read/play through to get a good grip on the themes, starting locale, and some of the characters of Forgotten Gods. The amount of background it sets is important and Forgotten Gods has a lot of call backs. The GM Kit Adventure, Desolation of the Dead, isn't as important. I only used it to flesh out the short Gallowsway portion of Forgotten Gods. Having details on the locations is helpful, but most of its plot can be forgotten. Even the cult vs. cult part of Forgotten Gods can be ignored almost completely. I left Desolation out of my campaign, as it feels a bit disjointed compared to the rest. However, I do plan on revisiting and tweaking it as a sort of "cleaning-up loose ends" epilogue.
  4. I don't really think that's the case. From what I've read, my own opinion, and those of my group, I think it simly boils down to the fact that most people don't like playing as the "bad" guys.
  5. The amount of information for Thaur and the Oath Unspoken is actually quite impressive. I feel like there is definitely more than enough information and ideas to do multiple adventures in either location. Even the extra information on Desoleum is good. When combined with the Core Rulebook and GM Kit, the information on HIve Desoleum and the surrounding wastes is quite comprehensive. All around, even if you don't plan on running the adventure, Forgotten Gods has great art, tons of information about the locales, characters, cultures, and organizations. There's plenty of ideas for NPCs and encounters that could work in any adventure/campaign and some neat rules for things like enivronmental/damage effects of combat aboard voidships (or tunnels, or sewers, etc.). Essentially, Forgotten Gods has a fun adventure and so much content that I wouldn't feel comfortable cramming it all into the story arc. Great stuff to borrow and use for a multitude of things. There's just not any full maps. There is a couple of simple ones for key encounters - very similar to those found in Dark Pursuits. Lastly, having looked at them, the new homeworld "options" are quite minor, and more just like little tweaks to the Hive World and Voidborn homeworlds. Still, they're apprecaited. Overall, it seems like a great book. I'm looking forward to starting it for my players on Friday.
  6. If it's following past releases, its generally Core Rulebook + GM Kit, Adventure Book (3 months later), and Player's Handbook (2-5 months later). Forgotten Gods was right on track at 3 months and Enemies Within has been slated for Q1 2015. My guess would be mid-February to early-March. If we're really lucky, we could even see before the end of January, but that's not very likely. According to the "Upcoming" section, it hasn't even hit the printers yet.
  7. Looks very interesting... The idea of Ordo-themed supplements is a neat concept, but I really hope that splitting the "Players Guide" type content into three books isn't too frustrating later when players have to flip back and forth between all the books. Gotta say, I'm pretty excited!
  8. I wasn't really expecting much in terms of rules, etc., but like you say, seeing how they highlighted the new homeworld features in numerous posts, it seems a little disappointing. Regardless, I'm still excited to get my hands on the book. Hopefully someone can post a review of the adventures soon.
  9. I haven't seen the book yet, as Canadian retailers haven't really received their copies yet, but I'm a little disappointed if the Rogue Trader ship is a Homeworld option instead of a Background option. Why wouldn't they use a Rogue Trader Crew as a background option instead of a Homeworld? Surely it would add tons more flavour and could be uniquely different from the other options in the core rulebook? It seems like there would be so many different options if that were the case. A Voidborn character with the Rogue Trade Crew background could be someone born into servitude on the ship, where as a Highborn Crew member could be one of the Rogue Trader's trusted officers or even a disgraced Rogue Trader him/herself? Seems like a missed opportunity...
  10. I’m going to play the devil’s advocate about the whole situation here: I’m thoroughly enjoying Dark Heresy Second Edition, and so are my players. Truthfully, I came into the 40k RPGs pretty late. I never played the original Dark Heresy, I never played Rogue Trader, nor Deathwatch, nor Black Crusade. I did however, play a few sessions of Only War, and the whole time I thought to myself: “You know what, this is great. An Inquisition version of this would be perfect.” I was pretty happy when that’s pretty much what I got. My group and I went into DH2 with open minds and we’ve been loving it so far. It’s a system with as much depth as you want to give it. Some people criticize the system for not pushing far enough in a new direction, but for people coming into the 40k RPG line for the first time, it’s great where it is. Knowing that I can also grab most of the supplements from DH1 or RT and have them fit pretty easily is awesome. Sure, the rulebook may have some typos and the occasional error, but coming from a background in Call of Cthulhu, you get used to that kinda thing awfully quick. If you’re arguing about some sections or profiles being “cut-and-paste”, go check out some other publishers’ books. In some cases, we’re talking about ENTIRE BOOKS “updated” with cut-and-paste while only changing a few stats. Also, once again, having just entered Dark Heresy and the 40k line now, I really couldn’t tell you what has been copied over. DH2 will be exactly what you want to make of it. For me, it’s a strong framework for some excellent narrative and combat experiences. For my players, they love the fantastic character creation, the classless leveling, and you know what? Even the setting. Calixis had more than half a decade to be fleshed out. We’ve had one book so far. Give Askellon time to grow. Once again, this book is what you make of it.
  11. No problem! I'm glad you like it so far! Please let me know how it goes or if you have any questions or feedback. My best piece of advice is to give your players really noticeable chances to search out services and products during missions. The more chances they have to upgrade their hub, the more invested they'll be. Good luck!
  12. EDIT: New version below! A common problem that has plagued many of my games, as well as those of my friends, is the issue of how to manage downtime – the awkward pauses between missions and adventures. Often, players feel forced into narrative and social situations without the feeling of any real, lasting impact. I was really unsure of whether to post this topic in House Rules or General Discussion, but as I didn't actually make any new mechanics myself, I figured it was better suited here. Additionally, the larger discussions about managing player downtime, creating social interactions, and building player "bases" would probably find a better audience here. The Mission Hub: I started toying with the idea of a meaningful, mechanically-impactful mission “hub” that would help utilize player downtime, foster socialization, and create a few alternative goals for players to keep in mind during their adventures. The hub that I created quickly allowed my players to create and build relationships (inter-player as well as with NPCs) and develop and pursue new side-missions. Additionally, as you’ll hopefully see, this hub also served to help contextualize Second Edition’s new Influence mechanics – inspiring players to pursue Influence generation and flesh out Reinforcement options. For my players, their hub has reinforced the feeling of a living, breathing game-world and has fostered a true feeling of freedom and player agency. I figured that I would share the details with you. A PDF document is found in the link below. This document includes a narrative overview of the hub that I’ve created, a few sample locations, as well as a few sample characters to populate these spaces. I've also included a few tips and ideas for GMs on how to best use these spaces and how player interaction with these areas can create lasting impacts to gameplay. Download: I’m not sure if you can attach files to a post, so I’ve provided a Dropbox link. I’ve made the document into a handy, printable, booklet-type format. Any comments, feedback, or discussion is much appreciated. New link below!
  13. Thank you for a constructive answer. Knowing the historical context of the rule helps tremendously. I was really hoping that there was just something I had missed in my readings, but it's nice to know I wasn't - and why.
  14. I completely get that. It's definitely a lot harder to hit a flailing cultist lightly than to just go all out. What I'm trying to get at is that a player can't just prod, jab, or tap an enemy with a weapon such as a Shock Maul to trigger effects like Shocking. It seems like unless you attack with a -20 penalty (Stun) or purchase a talent, you can't attempt to use the shocking trait of a shock maul without risking a potentially lethal hit. If using Stun or Takedown, you don't actually get to use the Shock Maul's Shocking trait... It would be the same effect as if you would attack them with your fists or the but of a pistol... Seems a bit odd...?
  15. I've poured through the book a couple of times now, but I'm trying to find if there is a way to hold back close combat weapon damage or to "pull a punch". Essentially, is there a way to choose to strike/tap someone with weapons (say a Shock Maul) to inflict minimal damage but to still trigger certain weapon effects? There is the combat action "Stun", but it causes a -20 penalty to do something that a shock maul can do anyways during a standard attack. Is there a way to simply choose to hold back and do less damage? I could have sworn that I read something, but I can't find it now.
  16. Logged into the forums just now to create a thread on this very topic. The glue for my entire book has let go. It's only being held together by the stitching and the front and rear covers. The book is literally falling apart. Really disappointed, as I've only had it for a little over a week, and I've only opened it a handful of times. This thing has disintegrated from only light use. I've sent an email to customer service, and I'm also waiting a response.
  17. I was kinda guessing that this may have been an issue leftover from Beta. I'll probably just house rule it so that the option for background aptitude is "Defence" for non-Psyker characters, or nothing for Psyker characters, since they'll pick up the extra "Psyker" aptitude anyways.... Thoughts?
  18. It just seems like the aptitudes clearly benefit players choosing a psyker rather than a non-psyker from that background: Non-psyker apitude choice: Defence or nothing Psyker aptitude choice: Defence or pick any one characteristic aptitude of your choice That's not to say that defence doesn't have it's uses, it just seems like a weird disparity between the choices available between Psykers and non-Psykers here. Simply put, I just really don't understand the choice of offering Psyker as an apptitude at all...
  19. I'm really hoping that someone can help clarify something for me. I was browsing through the Character Creation section and something still stands out to me as odd. For the Adeptus Astra Telepathica background, you get the choice of either "Defence" or "Psyker" as a Background Aptitude. It seems like the "Psyker" aptitude is useless on it's own. Any skill (eg. Psyniscience) or talent that uses "Psyker" as an aptitude also also requires the character to be a Psyker or to have a Psy Rating. However, if you choose the Psyker Elite Advance, you immediately get the Psyker aptitude anyways. Essentially, taking the "Psyker" Background Aptitude to make a non-Psyker character is useless, but taking it and then making a Psyker character gives you the Psyker aptitude again (essentially a free characteristic aptitude of choice). This seems a little bizarre... It seems like non-Psykers with the Adeptus Astra Telepathica background have the choice between Defence or something useless to them, but Psykers get the choice between Defence or any other characteristic aptitude... Am I missing something here?
  20. I've posted this in the Only War section as well, but figured that there might be more experience here… I'm running an Only War campaign and my PCs got wrapped up in this huge cult/conspiracy involving the high command for their regiment's home system. They "solved" the crisis but have now been captured by the Inquisition. They all really like the idea of moving to a Dark Heresy style game with more investigation and freedom. I'd like for an Inquisitor to take them on as acolytes (as their actions have shown that they can handle themselves), but would it be too much of a **** move to take away all their fancy armour and weapons and have them start from the bottom up? The best I can think of is to tell them is that all of their Imperial-issued gear would attract too much attention and/or its all evidence in the Inquisition's investigation. The problem is that some of them are quite attached to their gear: ie. Commissar with his power sword and bolt pistol, Weapon Specialist with his meltagun, Heavy has a heavy bolter….. they're all wearing carapace armour…. They're all excited for a more investigative-horror-survival type game, but how do I strip their gear without pissing them off? I'm just worried that every combat situation will be a joke.
  21. I'm running an Only War campaign and my PCs got wrapped up in this huge cult/conspiracy involving the high command for their regiment's home system. They "solved" the crisis but have now been captured by the Inquisition. They all really like the idea of moving to a Dark Heresy style game with more investigation and freedom. I'd like for an Inquisitor to take them on as acolytes (as their actions have shown that they can handle themselves), but would it be too much of a **** move to take away all their fancy armour and weapons and have them start from the bottom up? The best I can think of is to tell them is that all of their Imperial-issued gear would attract too much attention and/or its all evidence in the Inquisition's investigation. The problem is that some of them are quite attached to their gear: ie. Commissar with his power sword and bolt pistol, Weapon Specialist with his meltagun, Heavy has a heavy bolter….. they're all wearing carapace armour…. They're all excited for a more investigative-horror-survival type game, but how do I strip their gear without pissing them off? I'm just worried that every combat situation will be a joke.
  22. I would definitely award a fate point to whoever delivered the killing blow. For most people, Space Marines are only legends. The majority of people will never see one over the course of their entire lives. Whole planets look up to them as gods. For an individual to kill one would be a pretty big deal.
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