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The Grand Falloon

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  1. Like
    The Grand Falloon reacted to Tonbo Karasu in Monoculture - What if it wasn't so japanese?   
    FFG certainly seem to be introducing such influence already.  Look at this Phoenix card, for example of Korean styling:

  2. Like
    The Grand Falloon got a reaction from MonCalamariAgainstDrunkDriving in Removing strife from oportunities   
    Characters should be cautious about unmasking, but it's definitely not something they should never do!  The societal rules of Rokugan are one of the chief obstacles to overcome.  Part of the fun is working around them, but every so often, don't you just want to smash through them?  Unmasking is how you do that.  That obnoxious courtier keeps blocking your every move with a polite word in the right ear, and that smug little grin?  And now he's here in your favorite sake house, telling amusing stories about you to your drinking buddies?  How they all laugh at you, while he smiles at you, and says, "Oh, my old friend! It's all in jest!"  After all, you wouldn't want to make a scene, would you?
    To Jigoku with that!  Make a scene! Unmask, shove that twerp to the ground and challenge him to a duel, right here, right now.  If he's afraid of your blade, fists will do fine!  He can try to delay it, or insist on seeking permission from his lord, or ask for a second, but by doing so, he shows himself for a coward.
    Unmasking is supposed to be a way to move the story forward.  There are plenty of examples in movies and TV where entire stories come out of such loss of face.  In one episode of Firefly, Captain Reynolds gets angry and punches a rich snob at a fancy party, and as such, is expected to fight him with a sword the next day. Unmasking!
    Any secret love affair needs to have an unmasking!  Nobody wants a well-reasoned, stoic declaration of sturdy affection from your Earth Ring.  You roll that in Fire, and you keep every Strife symbol you can get!  Someone on these forums once lamented that you run the risk of unmasking any time you kiss a pretty girl.  I say, if you can kiss a pretty girl without unmasking, you're doing it all wrong!
     
  3. Thanks
    The Grand Falloon reacted to Myrion in Earth Stance too strong?   
    He compared it to Air. It's making Earth stance weaker than other stances, not just weaker than it was before.
  4. Like
    The Grand Falloon got a reaction from Tonbo Karasu in New GM. What's broken or OP?   
    Make the increased Deadliness of a finishing blow optional. Problem solved. If you use that increased Deadliness, it's pretty obvious to everyone that you were striking to kill. That also solves the issue with Deceitful Strike, which is that there's no mechanical "trying to kill" vs "not trying to kill".
    Unless that increased Deadliness becomes optional or you add some houserules to the Iaijutsu techniques, it's basically impossible to have an Iaijutsu duel to first blood.
  5. Like
    The Grand Falloon reacted to sidescroller in New GM. What's broken or OP?   
    See? This statement right here. Range bands don't work. 
  6. Like
    The Grand Falloon got a reaction from whafrog in 2 Custom talents I use to make tougher minions   
    I would modify Linked to some sort of "massed fire," and rule that they can only hit each target once.  Make them dangerous to the whole group, but they can't focus-fire multiple hits to one PC.
  7. Like
    The Grand Falloon got a reaction from yoink101 in 2 Custom talents I use to make tougher minions   
    I would modify Linked to some sort of "massed fire," and rule that they can only hit each target once.  Make them dangerous to the whole group, but they can't focus-fire multiple hits to one PC.
  8. Like
    The Grand Falloon reacted to Daeglan in Stumbled upon this interesting read...   
    It would not have been so difficult if they have planned out the trilogy ahead of time with a satisfying ending in mind from the beginning. But JJ does not plan.  Which is I suspect why none of his stuff has a satisfying conclusion. a cool idea is as far as he thinks ahead of time. 
  9. Like
    The Grand Falloon got a reaction from DarthDude in Sell me on FFG's game versus West End Games' Star Wars RPG.   
    I was skeptical of the new dice at first, then I played around with the system a little, played the starter set a little bit with my usual crew of casual gamers, and thought, "this is pretty good."

    Then I played Shadows of a Black Sun with a few dedicated nerds.  You know, the crazy kind of people who will actually read and understand the rules?  And I discovered something unexpected.

    This is the fastest system I've ever played.  Seriously.  These guys were jumping right in, taking cover, spending maneuvers properly, passing boost and setback dice around, and we finished the adventure in about an hour.  I've never done that before.  You need players who are excited about the system, and don't need a lot of guidance every session, but it can move really fast.

    Regarding the "cash grab" argument:  Each core book is a complete game.  Don't buy them all at once.  Force and Destiny right now is $40 on Amazon, probably $60 at your local game store.  I'll admit the dice are pricey at $15 a set, but see if some of your players can't pitch in a set.  We're working with 2 sets right now and it's been plenty, so that's $90 if you're going the expensive route.  If you hit up Amazon and the dice app instead, you're looking at $45.  For a product you can use for years and years.

    Seriously, I mean it about not getting all three Core books at once.  When I run this game, I'm running one game specifically.  I have two parallel campaigns going right now (Edge of the Empire and Force and Destiny), with a little bit of crossover.  So yeah, the Jedi might show up in the Edge of the Empire game once in a while, and the Droid Outlaw Tech helped the Force users out, but in my case it's definitely a crossover, not a combined game.  They're thematically very different.  After we wrap up some storylines, we may combine the two into an Age of Rebellion campaign with elements from all three games, but it will be an Age of Rebellion game.
  10. Like
    The Grand Falloon reacted to dreenan in Removing Stims   
    So in the end it always comes down to the same conclusion. If you are a GM with a certain mindset to a setting you need a bunch of players who think the same as you or do not care.
    And that´ is the overalll rule for all the (heated) discussions here, right? If everybody has fun on the table you are doing it right. If not you find a common ground.
  11. Like
    The Grand Falloon got a reaction from Stethemessiah in Removing Stims   
    Gotta say, I really liked Whafrog's take on the whole thing. I ran it by some of my players, added some stuff and tweaked some others. Here's my current take on it. I'll see how it goes. I should mention that I don't normally require a Destiny flip for using Dark Side pips.
     
    Stimpacks: Gone. Replaced by…
    Rallying Surge: Once per encounter, as a maneuver, make a Simple (Difficulty 0) Resilience Roll.  Heal a number of wounds equal to 3+ Net Successes, and recover Strain equal to Advantage. You may spend your Rallying Surge on an Engaged ally, instead rolling either Leadership, Medicine, or Coercion.  Each use of Rallying Surge on a given character increases the Difficulty by 1.
    Heal/Harm Power: TBD
    Stimpack Specialization works basically as written. Your Rallying Surges heal 1 extra wound per rank of Stimpack Specialization. 
    Exceeding Wound Threshold: A PC or Nemesis who exceeds his Wound Threshold is no longer immediately Incapacitated.  Instead, he upgrades the Difficulty of all checks by 1, and will become Incapacitated when he exceeds his WTx2. Note that every time he suffers wounds above his Threshold, he still suffers a Critical Injury.  Such a character is advised to retreat or surrender.
    Exceeding Strain Threshold: As with wounds, a PC or Nemesis who exceeds his Strain Threshold is not incapacitated, but will become so when he exceeds STx2.  However, while above ST, he may not willingly suffer Strain, and is Disoriented (suffers 1 Setback die to all rolls).
    A Character who exceeds both WT and ST becomes Incapacitated.
    Force Pips: Using the Force while over Strain Threshold is difficult.  A Light Side Force-user may still use Dark Pips, but instead of suffering Strain, they must flip a Destiny Point and take two Conflict for each Dark Pip used.
    A Dark-sider who wishes to use White Pips must flip Destiny, and suffer a Wound for each White Pip he wishes to use.
     
  12. Like
    The Grand Falloon got a reaction from Stethemessiah in Removing Stims   
    The concern isn't a matter of game balance.  The concern is that it's not very Star Wars to be in a blaster fight and everyone is getting shot up, and they're all jamming needles in themselves like junkies under a bridge. Dropping behind a stack of crates while the medic makes a Medicine roll for a round is a little more palatable, and more like something we see in action movies.
  13. Like
    The Grand Falloon got a reaction from Archlyte in Abstract Wealth   
    I know, we’ve had a lot of attempts at Abstract Wealth.  Well, I’m taking my own crack at it.  It’s probably pretty similar to what’s come before.  Also, it’s still very much in the concept phase. 
    Basic Idea: Everyone has a Wealth Rating, which represents what they can easily buy.  I’m thinking that for most characters, it would start at 2.  Anything they might purchase has a Cost, based on the order of magnitude of its listed cost.  the Difficulty of the Cost would basically be how many digits are in its listed cost, -1.  So anything that costs 1-9 credits has a difficulty of Simple (no difficulty dice).  Anything 10-99 would have a difficulty of 1, 100-999 difficulty 2, and so on.  In most circumstances, characters can buy goods below their Wealth Rating without much worry.  Probably don’t even roll, unless they’re buying enough to bump it up a notch.  When a character wants to buy something that equals his Wealth Rating, he’ll need to roll his Wealth Dice, upgraded by his ranks in the Negotiation skill (Not calculated as skills usually are.  If he has Wealth 2 and Negotiation 4, he rolls 3 Yellow, not 2 Yellow, 2 green.  There is some precedent for this with the Mass Combat rules).  If he succeeds, he gets the item, and does not have to adjust his Wealth.  If he fails, he can buy the item, but his Wealth Rating will be reduced by 1 until time passes (GM fiat.  Maybe at the end of a story arc, or until the group finds a significant windfall).  If the character wants to buy something one difficulty higher than his Wealth, he again needs to roll.  If he Succeeds, he gets the item, and his Wealth is reduced, as above.  If he fails, he just can’t afford it. Anything two or more ranks higher than his Wealth Rating, he just can’t purchase without taking Obligation.  Or maybe spending Duty?  I dunno, I haven’t really gotten into AoR.  Perhaps add a Setback die if the item listed cost starts with 5 or more.  So something that costs 600 credits would have a Difficulty of PPS.
    That’s the basic framework.  I’m thinking there should also be Windfall, for when you find a significant, but temporary amount of cash or easily tradable goods.  Windfall can be used to make purchases without reducing your Wealth, or can be invested to permanently increase your Wealth later.  Still at the drawing board on all that.  Also still working out the effects of Threat, Advantage, and so forth.
    Whaddya think, am I on the right track here?
    Edit: Font was weird.
  14. Haha
    The Grand Falloon got a reaction from Rimsen in Stealing data from a Player's Brain Implant   
    I like the dreamscape idea. I don't think a brain implant should be hackable by traditional means. This is me taking some creative liberties, but I think the brain would act almost as an encryption key.  If Dave's brain wrote the data, you need Dave's brain to interpret it. So you need some way to scan his thoughts, and then get his brain to actually access that data.
    Hence the dreamscape. Basically start the session with him already in a weird situation. Have occasional weird glitches in reality. But also a little droid that shows up to help out, and drop hints that something is wrong.  This droid is the representation of his brain chip's security, which is super weak until he gets it upgraded.  I'm basically imagining Clippy, from Microsoft Word. Just an annoying little droid with googly eyes that pops out of nowhere and asks if he needs help with something.
    "HI! I'm CL1-PI! It looks like you're trying to open The Lost Temple of Darth MacGuffin, can I help you with that?"
    "What? No, I'm not trying to do that, I need to give a speech, but I'm naked!"
    "Are you sure? What do your notes say?"
    "'Professor Dave: a Dissertation on Opening the Lost Temple of Darth MacGuffin.' Why would I give a speech on this? And where was I keeping these notes?"
    "It sure is a mystery!"
  15. Like
    The Grand Falloon reacted to wilsch in Removing Stims   
    I'll chime in with an experience and GMing preference similar to Whafrog's. 
    My table, 4 years strong this month, has players who are really into Star Wars and love FFG's dice, but have shown very little interest in any of the game's more structured elements. From the start we used limited custom talents, so house rules have been easy to implement.
    Frankly, I think the array of weapons and armor would perfectly fit a Borderlands adaptation in its variety. For my group, though, a blaster's a blaster -- it may be bigger or smaller or maybe high-quality but details beyond relevance to the story don't interest them.
    Nobody minded the removal of Stims. Early on, I allowed Strain expenditures to mitigate damage but realized even that was too much -- so weapon damage consists of Boost, while Soak and Armor are replaced with simplified parameters for Setback. Everything's contained within a dice roll, which feels right for our group, and the modified scale of damage to WT/HT corresponds to my old Strain mitigation setup. (Enemy Wound/Trauma is lowered for pacing.) A few additional rules cover the rest of combat.
    Players like to get out of scrapes and focus on problem-solving with their entire spectrum of skills, so it works well for us.
  16. Like
    The Grand Falloon got a reaction from kaosoe in Stealing data from a Player's Brain Implant   
    Ooh, that's even better. Introduce him as the character starts to figure out he's in his own mind. "I'm CL1-PI, a security routine for your brain implant! Someone is trying to access secure data, I'll help you protect it!"
    Heck, get the other players involved. Give them each a weird avatar to play in this guy's mindscape.
  17. Haha
    The Grand Falloon got a reaction from Bellona in Stealing data from a Player's Brain Implant   
    I like the dreamscape idea. I don't think a brain implant should be hackable by traditional means. This is me taking some creative liberties, but I think the brain would act almost as an encryption key.  If Dave's brain wrote the data, you need Dave's brain to interpret it. So you need some way to scan his thoughts, and then get his brain to actually access that data.
    Hence the dreamscape. Basically start the session with him already in a weird situation. Have occasional weird glitches in reality. But also a little droid that shows up to help out, and drop hints that something is wrong.  This droid is the representation of his brain chip's security, which is super weak until he gets it upgraded.  I'm basically imagining Clippy, from Microsoft Word. Just an annoying little droid with googly eyes that pops out of nowhere and asks if he needs help with something.
    "HI! I'm CL1-PI! It looks like you're trying to open The Lost Temple of Darth MacGuffin, can I help you with that?"
    "What? No, I'm not trying to do that, I need to give a speech, but I'm naked!"
    "Are you sure? What do your notes say?"
    "'Professor Dave: a Dissertation on Opening the Lost Temple of Darth MacGuffin.' Why would I give a speech on this? And where was I keeping these notes?"
    "It sure is a mystery!"
  18. Like
    The Grand Falloon got a reaction from P-47 Thunderbolt in Stealing data from a Player's Brain Implant   
    Ooh, that's even better. Introduce him as the character starts to figure out he's in his own mind. "I'm CL1-PI, a security routine for your brain implant! Someone is trying to access secure data, I'll help you protect it!"
    Heck, get the other players involved. Give them each a weird avatar to play in this guy's mindscape.
  19. Like
    The Grand Falloon got a reaction from Stethemessiah in Stealing data from a Player's Brain Implant   
    Ooh, that's even better. Introduce him as the character starts to figure out he's in his own mind. "I'm CL1-PI, a security routine for your brain implant! Someone is trying to access secure data, I'll help you protect it!"
    Heck, get the other players involved. Give them each a weird avatar to play in this guy's mindscape.
  20. Haha
    The Grand Falloon got a reaction from Stethemessiah in Stealing data from a Player's Brain Implant   
    I like the dreamscape idea. I don't think a brain implant should be hackable by traditional means. This is me taking some creative liberties, but I think the brain would act almost as an encryption key.  If Dave's brain wrote the data, you need Dave's brain to interpret it. So you need some way to scan his thoughts, and then get his brain to actually access that data.
    Hence the dreamscape. Basically start the session with him already in a weird situation. Have occasional weird glitches in reality. But also a little droid that shows up to help out, and drop hints that something is wrong.  This droid is the representation of his brain chip's security, which is super weak until he gets it upgraded.  I'm basically imagining Clippy, from Microsoft Word. Just an annoying little droid with googly eyes that pops out of nowhere and asks if he needs help with something.
    "HI! I'm CL1-PI! It looks like you're trying to open The Lost Temple of Darth MacGuffin, can I help you with that?"
    "What? No, I'm not trying to do that, I need to give a speech, but I'm naked!"
    "Are you sure? What do your notes say?"
    "'Professor Dave: a Dissertation on Opening the Lost Temple of Darth MacGuffin.' Why would I give a speech on this? And where was I keeping these notes?"
    "It sure is a mystery!"
  21. Like
    The Grand Falloon got a reaction from Edgehawk in Stealing data from a Player's Brain Implant   
    I like the dreamscape idea. I don't think a brain implant should be hackable by traditional means. This is me taking some creative liberties, but I think the brain would act almost as an encryption key.  If Dave's brain wrote the data, you need Dave's brain to interpret it. So you need some way to scan his thoughts, and then get his brain to actually access that data.
    Hence the dreamscape. Basically start the session with him already in a weird situation. Have occasional weird glitches in reality. But also a little droid that shows up to help out, and drop hints that something is wrong.  This droid is the representation of his brain chip's security, which is super weak until he gets it upgraded.  I'm basically imagining Clippy, from Microsoft Word. Just an annoying little droid with googly eyes that pops out of nowhere and asks if he needs help with something.
    "HI! I'm CL1-PI! It looks like you're trying to open The Lost Temple of Darth MacGuffin, can I help you with that?"
    "What? No, I'm not trying to do that, I need to give a speech, but I'm naked!"
    "Are you sure? What do your notes say?"
    "'Professor Dave: a Dissertation on Opening the Lost Temple of Darth MacGuffin.' Why would I give a speech on this? And where was I keeping these notes?"
    "It sure is a mystery!"
  22. Like
    The Grand Falloon got a reaction from P-47 Thunderbolt in Stealing data from a Player's Brain Implant   
    I like the dreamscape idea. I don't think a brain implant should be hackable by traditional means. This is me taking some creative liberties, but I think the brain would act almost as an encryption key.  If Dave's brain wrote the data, you need Dave's brain to interpret it. So you need some way to scan his thoughts, and then get his brain to actually access that data.
    Hence the dreamscape. Basically start the session with him already in a weird situation. Have occasional weird glitches in reality. But also a little droid that shows up to help out, and drop hints that something is wrong.  This droid is the representation of his brain chip's security, which is super weak until he gets it upgraded.  I'm basically imagining Clippy, from Microsoft Word. Just an annoying little droid with googly eyes that pops out of nowhere and asks if he needs help with something.
    "HI! I'm CL1-PI! It looks like you're trying to open The Lost Temple of Darth MacGuffin, can I help you with that?"
    "What? No, I'm not trying to do that, I need to give a speech, but I'm naked!"
    "Are you sure? What do your notes say?"
    "'Professor Dave: a Dissertation on Opening the Lost Temple of Darth MacGuffin.' Why would I give a speech on this? And where was I keeping these notes?"
    "It sure is a mystery!"
  23. Like
    The Grand Falloon got a reaction from KveldUlfr in Reasons for changing schools   
    Okay, I don't think changing schools is a good idea, but I also believe in finding the ways something could work.  I've had a lot of harebrained schemes that get pooh-poohed, but, dangit, I'm gonna try anyway.  So here's my thoughts:
    Changing schools should be exceedingly rare.  A Kakita marrying into the Akodo family is still a duelist, not a general.  In most instances, you would want to just learn a few skills or techniques consistent with the family you joined.  That's fine.  Actually changing schools should require a complete commitment to their ways.
    I would do this by just switching to the new school's curriculum.  A rank 2 Bushi who completely commits to the new school would begin using their curriculum at Rank 3.
    Now, a few notes.  I don't think I would ever allow someone to become a shugenja.  I may allow a shugenja to become a courtier, but probably not a bushi.  Monks are a whole new can of worms that I would be very leery of.  For "available techniques," it's a little tricky.  The GM should decide if they keep their original techniques, or if they must switch to the new ones.  The player should not be allowed to choose (but should be informed).  For example, most Shugenja have Rituals, Shuji and Invocations, while most Courtiers have Kata, Rituals and Shuji.  A shugenja who became a courtier would never be able to learn another invocation if they had to switch to Kata, so they should probably keep their original techniques available.  They might pick up a stray Kata from their new curriculum, but that shouldn't be too troublesome.  Of course, without Invocations on their curriculum, they'll advance very slowly each time they take one.
    As to School Abilities, I would never, ever, EVER allow a single character to have two of them.  Absolutely out of the question. Most school abilities come in two parts.  The first is not rank-dependent, the second is dependent, but usually comes with diminishing returns.  Consider the Hida Defender.  He ignores the Cumbersome quality of armor he wears, and may reduce the severity of crits by his Armor+Rank.  Both cool abilities.  As he goes up in Rank, that Crit Resistance goes up slowly.
    Now consider the Hiruma Scout.  After Attacking, he can change stances, which is considered by many to be a broken technique.  If he does so, he can raise the TN to hit him by large critters by his school rank.  Potentially very helpful, but also extremely circumstantial.  So a Hida who became a Hiruma would wear heavy armor without penalty, could switch stances after attacking, would be extremely crit resistant, and if fighting something big, could raise his TN to be hit. That's too much.  Far too much.
  24. Like
    The Grand Falloon got a reaction from whafrog in Removing Stims   
    I've been a big fan of Savage Worlds for... yikes, I just realized it must be almost 15 years now.  I really like their system, which has Shaken 1-3 wounds, and Incapacitated.  The Apocalypse games usually use something a bit less hit-pointy.
    While I can't speak for Whafrog, I really appreciate L5R's distinction that Fatigue is NOT the same thing as being wounded. Star Wars Wounds and D&D Hit Points have always been a combination of fatigue and wounds, and the line between them changes a lot from table to table.  I've played in numerous D&D games where someone takes a lot of damage and the DM says, "the dark knight runs you through!" Nevermind that the guy with a sword through his guts still has half of his Hit Points remaining.
    So I try to say that anything that only causes "damage" isn't really a serious wound. Taking 15 damage from an orc doesn't necessarily mean he cut you, it means his axe slammed into your shield hard enough that your arm nearly gives out from the impact. A Stormtrooper causing 12 damage with his blaster rifle didn't shoot you, but the blaster bolt passed close enough to your skin that it managed to burn you, or hit the wall next to you, exploding and showering you with sparks.  When Leia took that shot to the shoulder on Endor, that was a Critical Injury, not just "taking damage." Vader and Obi-Wan's duel on the Death Star caused them both to take a lot of "damage," but no Crits as far as I see. I would say that the characters in the movies take a lot of "hits" and "damage" that don't really look like much on screen.
    One of the reasons I like Whafrog's take is that it reminds me of The Angry GM's "fighting spirit" rules (not a big fan of his writing style, but I like his ideas). It gives a space between "I'm fine, I'm fine, I'm fine, I'm down." There's a clear point at which the player knows that if he keeps fighting, his character may die. If my PCs all get knocked out, I'm not just going to kill their characters. That feels cheap.  However, if a character is over his WT and wants to keep pushing, now it's on him and the player.  He knows the risk, and he's taking it rather than surrender or retreat.
    It also gives us a way to kill Nemeses without GM fiat or murdering an unconscious person. We just finished Chronicles of the Gatekeeper (spoiler alert), and part of the final conflict is supposed to be choosing whether to pull your punches and not kill the boss, or to go ahead and finish him.  Which means the GM needs to call out to the players, "Oh, by the way, if you defeat him with Wounds, he'll die, because that's just how we're playing this fight." With Whafrog's rule applied to a Nemesis, the boss is taking a Critical Injury every time he gets hit past a certain point, which means killing him through Crits becomes a distinct possibility.
  25. Like
    The Grand Falloon got a reaction from Inquisitor Tremayne in Removing Stims   
    Gotta say, I really liked Whafrog's take on the whole thing. I ran it by some of my players, added some stuff and tweaked some others. Here's my current take on it. I'll see how it goes. I should mention that I don't normally require a Destiny flip for using Dark Side pips.
     
    Stimpacks: Gone. Replaced by…
    Rallying Surge: Once per encounter, as a maneuver, make a Simple (Difficulty 0) Resilience Roll.  Heal a number of wounds equal to 3+ Net Successes, and recover Strain equal to Advantage. You may spend your Rallying Surge on an Engaged ally, instead rolling either Leadership, Medicine, or Coercion.  Each use of Rallying Surge on a given character increases the Difficulty by 1.
    Heal/Harm Power: TBD
    Stimpack Specialization works basically as written. Your Rallying Surges heal 1 extra wound per rank of Stimpack Specialization. 
    Exceeding Wound Threshold: A PC or Nemesis who exceeds his Wound Threshold is no longer immediately Incapacitated.  Instead, he upgrades the Difficulty of all checks by 1, and will become Incapacitated when he exceeds his WTx2. Note that every time he suffers wounds above his Threshold, he still suffers a Critical Injury.  Such a character is advised to retreat or surrender.
    Exceeding Strain Threshold: As with wounds, a PC or Nemesis who exceeds his Strain Threshold is not incapacitated, but will become so when he exceeds STx2.  However, while above ST, he may not willingly suffer Strain, and is Disoriented (suffers 1 Setback die to all rolls).
    A Character who exceeds both WT and ST becomes Incapacitated.
    Force Pips: Using the Force while over Strain Threshold is difficult.  A Light Side Force-user may still use Dark Pips, but instead of suffering Strain, they must flip a Destiny Point and take two Conflict for each Dark Pip used.
    A Dark-sider who wishes to use White Pips must flip Destiny, and suffer a Wound for each White Pip he wishes to use.
     
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