Jump to content

Pyremius

Members
  • Content Count

    76
  • Joined

  • Last visited


Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    Pyremius reacted to kmanweiss in Clarification on healing potion from F&D Unlimited Power   
    A finger is not trivial.  Joints, muscles, tendons, ligaments, bone, fat, skin, nails, nerves, vascular tissues, etc.  An arm may contain more mass, but the degree of complication is still just as great.  Sure, an ear or the tip of your nose are rather simple in comparison, but there is still a lot going on there.  I wouldn't put it past Star Wars tech levels to be able to regrow some fairly complicated tissues in order to replace body parts...in a lab, which the proper tech at hand.  The healing potion however can't just craft matter out of nothing.  It can heal tissue that exists, but it can't create new tissue beyond what the body can regenerate.
    Cleanly cut off arm, crudely stuck back in place and then drink the potion...I could see some fairly miraculous healing where the body regrafts the limb to itself.  Cut that ear, finger, nose, wingus off and throw it away.  Sorry, the body can't regenerate that much complicated mass.  The healing potion can stop the bleeding, create some scar tissue covering, and make sure you don't die, but that's about it because that is all the body can do on it's own.  The healing potion just expedites the healing process.
  2. Like
    Pyremius got a reaction from Desslok in Career-hopping specializations   
    I'd notice that FFG has consistently kept to a maximum of 6 specializations per career.  One idea is that certain things are primary to a career, and while still valuable, other things are not.  Another idea is that this is ultimately a multi-player game, and therefore it is good to allow each character to have some features that others do not have, so everyone has a chance to be valuable to the group.  Putting everything one player wants into a single career invalidates a lot of the value other players could be bringing to the group.  The use of XP taxes (buying in to additional specs, and the premium for going out-of-career) are a way to allow the player to come up with whatever personally-satisfying combination the want, while still allowing other players to contribute - they'll have more Skill ranks and Talents overall.
    I'd even question the idea that most pilots would be able to perform a barrel roll. Freighters aren't designed for those kinds of maneuvers, and one of the best ways to stay out of trouble is to not be noticed - and barrel-rolling a freighter is conspicuously absent from the list of "ways not to get noticed".  Adding it to the Ace/Pilot might make sense, although I'd want to make sure I'm taking off something equally valuable so the spec doesn't become too good compared to what other careers have access to.
  3. Like
    Pyremius reacted to EliasWindrider in Destiny Points and Equipment   
    The way I run it, they got to retcon that earlier they actually did buy the items (deduct credits retroactively) and then they get to keep it because they paid credits for it.
  4. Like
    Pyremius reacted to Daeglan in Destiny Points and Equipment   
    They should spend the credits for the item if you are gonna do that.
  5. Like
    Pyremius reacted to Arbitrator in Why do people hate Jedi?   
    If I have a 'problem player' there is a 9/10 chance that person is either going to want to play a Jedi (regardless of era), a Mandalorian or even worse, both. The former will usually then complain F&D is a bad book because it doesn't let them "be as powerful as the Jedi in the films." 
    I don't have an issue with them in the lore.
  6. Like
    Pyremius got a reaction from Archlyte in Dark Question: How much does a slave cost?   
    One advantage to slaves is their flexibility.  Since most droids are built to purpose (not overbuilt with unneeded capacity), teaching a droid is typically a destructive process - you have to take out the old skills so there's room for the new ones.  Sentients can typically add to their skillset, and any losses that do occur tend to be more superficially and thus easily recovered.

    Initiative is a double-edged sword, but slaves can much better react to change, reducing the overall costs in an unstable environment.  Droids will tend to follow their instructions, even if situational changes make the instructions useless or harmful.  In a mining accident there's a chance the slaves will notice in time and flee the danger site, while droids will keep working until they're crushed/burned/etc.
  7. Like
    Pyremius reacted to HappyDaze in Dark Question: How much does a slave cost?   
    I would keep them cheap individually, but have them sold in lots. They might be able to afford one, but they have to buy a six-pack...
  8. Like
    Pyremius reacted to thepopemobile100 in Getting Back into it... Will we see larger pt games?   
    We already have a larger point game called grand army. It's 1600 points.
    I don't want to see a point hike in standard play. It would harm list variety in factions as they currently stand and would make a larger barrier of entry for anyone interested
  9. Like
    Pyremius got a reaction from Daredhnu in Force Decks   
    Has anyone heard about plans to release decks for the various Force Powers?
  10. Like
    Pyremius got a reaction from Mark Caliber in Ideas needed - Abandoned Station   
    Sudden Depressurization - old materials can't handle the strain of suddenly being repressurized / affected by gravity. Bulkheads auto-closed when power returned and atmospheric pressure began rising at different rates. Mold - assuming the base didn't get a planned shutdown, there was probably still atmosphere after the environmental systems went offline.  Molds can be pretty hardy, and are now "waking up" and getting spread by the newly-started environmental systems. Partial atmosphere - the reserve tanks weren't full enough, and you've only got to make maneuvering difficult, but not enough to breathe. Mynock damage - they tore up / ate data lines, and entire sections of the base are non-responsive.  Even if the machinery's working, you have no access to cameras or sensor readings, and no remote control. Micro-leaks - air keeps getting pumped in, but with no sensors there's no way to tell the leak is in this area.  Hopefully they guess right enough to get the dead sector closed back off until repairs can be made. Multi-environment capability - one or more sectors defaults to an ammonia atmosphere on re-start (hopefully not the sector they're in at the time). Life-form sensor is malfunctioning, and believes the PCs need a different environment - starting an emergency purge & replace. Fire suppression system spontaneously activates (depressurizes to starve the fire).  
  11. Like
    Pyremius got a reaction from RLogue177 in Ideas needed - Abandoned Station   
    Sudden Depressurization - old materials can't handle the strain of suddenly being repressurized / affected by gravity. Bulkheads auto-closed when power returned and atmospheric pressure began rising at different rates. Mold - assuming the base didn't get a planned shutdown, there was probably still atmosphere after the environmental systems went offline.  Molds can be pretty hardy, and are now "waking up" and getting spread by the newly-started environmental systems. Partial atmosphere - the reserve tanks weren't full enough, and you've only got to make maneuvering difficult, but not enough to breathe. Mynock damage - they tore up / ate data lines, and entire sections of the base are non-responsive.  Even if the machinery's working, you have no access to cameras or sensor readings, and no remote control. Micro-leaks - air keeps getting pumped in, but with no sensors there's no way to tell the leak is in this area.  Hopefully they guess right enough to get the dead sector closed back off until repairs can be made. Multi-environment capability - one or more sectors defaults to an ammonia atmosphere on re-start (hopefully not the sector they're in at the time). Life-form sensor is malfunctioning, and believes the PCs need a different environment - starting an emergency purge & replace. Fire suppression system spontaneously activates (depressurizes to starve the fire).  
  12. Like
    Pyremius got a reaction from MasterZelgadis in Ideas needed - Abandoned Station   
    Sudden Depressurization - old materials can't handle the strain of suddenly being repressurized / affected by gravity. Bulkheads auto-closed when power returned and atmospheric pressure began rising at different rates. Mold - assuming the base didn't get a planned shutdown, there was probably still atmosphere after the environmental systems went offline.  Molds can be pretty hardy, and are now "waking up" and getting spread by the newly-started environmental systems. Partial atmosphere - the reserve tanks weren't full enough, and you've only got to make maneuvering difficult, but not enough to breathe. Mynock damage - they tore up / ate data lines, and entire sections of the base are non-responsive.  Even if the machinery's working, you have no access to cameras or sensor readings, and no remote control. Micro-leaks - air keeps getting pumped in, but with no sensors there's no way to tell the leak is in this area.  Hopefully they guess right enough to get the dead sector closed back off until repairs can be made. Multi-environment capability - one or more sectors defaults to an ammonia atmosphere on re-start (hopefully not the sector they're in at the time). Life-form sensor is malfunctioning, and believes the PCs need a different environment - starting an emergency purge & replace. Fire suppression system spontaneously activates (depressurizes to starve the fire).  
  13. Like
    Pyremius reacted to themensch in New Book Alert: Allies and Adversaries   
    I come from a time before hyperlinks.  🤭
  14. Like
    Pyremius got a reaction from Donovan Morningfire in Some doubts on Lightsaber Mods   
    Think of it this way - there is no "standard Ilum crystal".  Every crystal is unique, and neither the player nor the GM knows what that crystal's capabilities are (much less the character).  Each time your character tries to modify the crystal, they always succeed in learning something new about it - it's just sometimes they learn it's not quite as good as they had hoped.  Improving your Mechanics score doesn't make modifying the crystal easier, it stacks fate in your favor as to how powerful a crystal you really received.
  15. Like
    Pyremius got a reaction from ThreeAM in Advice Needed - Player wants to play exiled Black Sun operative   
    The problem I see is what will he be doing going forward?

    The best idea I've got is that as a relatively new recruit, he was involved in an operation that went wrong in all the ways that pushed his "nope" buttons - but managed to pull off the miracle that saved the operation.  After the dust settles, someone with a lot authority has to publicly reward the associate who saved the day, but said associate realizes they're in over their head and really don't want this kind of life.  A token reward and get cut loose with the message "don't interfere" going both directions mostly works.  He won't be able to call on Black Sun contacts, because they're under orders to honor his wish to be left alone - but they won't come trying to involve him, either.  If he decides to reach out and re-join they might be interested, although there will be some understandable concern about his willingness to follow through.
  16. Haha
    Pyremius reacted to penpenpen in Skill Check, Multiple try?   
    I'm kind of stuck on the mental image of the scenario where the brave adventurer swaggers up to the shopkeep, hands her a rose and asks for a discount and when refused, sulkingly snatches the rose back and hands it to his buddy who tries his line on her...
    But yeah, either let the players collaborate on a single roll or increase the stakes and diffculty for everyone who tries it.
    In fact, upgrading the difficulty would probably be a good mechanic, as by the time the third or fourth person waves that rose in her face the risk of her just being creeped out and calling the cops on them for harassment would probably be about the same as the rapidly increasing risk of a despair.
  17. Like
    Pyremius got a reaction from Underachiever599 in Creating Inquisitors   
    If you want a recurring villain, I think Underachiever599  has the right idea: don't let the PCs face him directly very often.  Since the Inquisitorious doesn't get involved until there's a reason, the first "encounters" should probably indirect.  Round one could be an ambush by local troops, with the Inquisitor observing from a distance to learn the PC's tactics.  Next up could be a capture mission, possibly using specialist troops or mercenaries.  Only after they've confirmed Force users are present and have started to learn a bit about the group's strengths and weaknesses, should the Inquisitor start getting involved directly - and they should always have a way out planned.  The important thing is for the Inquisitor to always have the initiative - not in combat, but in staging the encounters with the PCs.

    Assume the PCs will win any straight battle the Inquisitor initiates, and have a way to avoid losing.  "We can kill him in just 5 more rounds" sounds good . . . unless there's a pair of AT-AT's 3 rounds away (conveniently loud enough to hear/feel over the sounds of battle).  Disengage while "winning" so they can flee should become the party's MO, with a transition towards having the Inquisitor being the one to flee as the party get's more powerful - and then the Inquisitor changes tactics and starts going after the PC's support network.  Eventually the PCs should get fed up with the interference and go on the offense, trying to take the fight to the Inquisitor.  When they finally chase him down after cutting off his access to Imperial resources, you'll get the climactic battle with no more escape options* and the death of their nemesis.

    *Any opportunity to "lose" the body for a second round is, of course, acceptable.  With Darth Maul surviving Naboo part of canon again (And Anakin, for that matter), plausibility is not particularly necessary.
  18. Like
    Pyremius reacted to Roderz in Star Wars:Hunters on the Rim   
    I'm a big fan of the Wayfarer, I love the idea of finding some esoteric module for it or retrofitting an hangar bay for a couple of fighters. That said, our likely pilot@oneeyedmatt87 should definitely weigh in. The difference between 4 and 5 is pretty significant combat-wise I believe. I believe flight combat can sort of come up as much as we want it to. I'm equally happy with pretty much anything mentioned so far. My only caveat is steering away from the cliche a little, in not having a YT-1300.
  19. Like
    Pyremius reacted to HappyDaze in Skill Check vs. Role-Playing   
    You should extend that to other skills too. The player that whips out a handgun and fires off a few shots deserves a Boost on his Ranged (Light) check... right before you call the cops.
  20. Like
    Pyremius got a reaction from Edgehawk in Star Wars:Hunters on the Rim   
    The Lancer caps at 6 occupancy.  Some more spacious options would be YKL-37R Nova Courier (probably too good), YG-4210 Light Freighter, GX-1 Short hauler, or the ZH-25 Questor Light Freighter.  All of these carry at least 8, and I'll admit to liking the looks of all of them.  None are as fast as the Lancer, but a couple could be modded into the range of a stock Lancer.  I like th elooks of the Lancer also, but if we're looking at 6-8 people it might not be large enough.

    So far as character options go : I started playing a Sentinel for about 6 months before our GM moved for work, and played some sort of tech in a WEG d6 game ~25 years ago.  My suspicion is that I'll tend to gravitate in that direction if nobody else is taking a strong tech-focus so if that's what you want to do just remind me to keep my hands off your focus.   If I end up as the tech,  my preferred mission would probably be industrial espionage, or anything that requires our employer to provide us with prototype or rare gear (especially if we can keep it.)
     
    Edit: I've started reading through the books to see what jumps out at me.  One idea (of questionable value) is a Sullustan Modder/Operator with dreams of acquiring a 64-Y Swift 3 as his signature vehicle.  Rather than doing direct capture work, he would focus on patrol and mobile reinforcement for bigger jobs.  Current complications include: starting career (I don't know what direction I want to go for Spec 3+); cost (8K base, plus weapons and other mods); will we even be taking the kinds of jobs where having mobile heavy backup should be routine?
  21. Like
    Pyremius reacted to Jabby in Is anyone concerned about generic officers?   
    I’m probably going to still use named characters but also generics. Prolly a named-generec combo. That seems like the most effective use
  22. Like
    Pyremius got a reaction from crashnburninc in Slicing Remotely   
    My thoughts:
    Holonet Communicators:
    Bulky, power-hungry equipment, with exclusively point-to-point communication (laser, not radio).  Mid-stream interception is effectively impossible for two reasons: it's not broadcast, and it travels through hyperspace.  Connecting a rogue node is easy because it was originally a civilian system that was designed for growth; it only became a military tool when the Empire began restricting its use, and they haven't re-engineered the entire system (and replaced all the existing nodes).  The difficult part of setting up a rogue node is convincing anyone who notices the new connection to not bother assigning a Star Destroyer to check it out before you can relocate.  To flesh the design out a little further: the original design had core nodes with well-publicized "addresses": any new node would initially connect to one of them, and then download an up-to-date list of closer nodes to connect to.  Star Destroyers don't actually initiate communication directly with each other via Holonet: they connect back to fixed-location communication stations that have the processing power needed to update the target's location, and records of where the rest of the fleet was last located.  Potentially, it's not possible to use the Holonet while moving, whichever you prefer.  In either case, it would make sense that you can't initiate a Holonet transmission to a ship unless it hasn't moved since you last received its location.

    Wireless networks:
    Not normally used for security reasons.  With the ubiquity of computing equipment, the shear volume of people in society (if one person in a million is a computer-literate thief, how many are there in a society of hundreds of trillions?), and the phenomenal number of droids, any wireless channels into the typical network will be isolated in the strongest ways possible from anything of real value - with intrusion detection being an even higher priority (I don't have to keep you out of my network.  I only have to get you arrested/killed before you get to my data).  Pick your preferred explanation for why physical access equates to "slicing is possible".  The solution for "the guy in the chair" then is as described above: portable wireless interfaces.  Plug one into the target and you get to use your wireless network instead of theirs (bypassing their wireless security) on their physical network.  The downside (for the GM to exploit) is that there's now a rogue wireless signal in the area; depending on the security level it might have a chance of being noticed (possible setback dice, and a use for Despair).  One upside for the players is they can plug one in and then head in a different direction to keep attention away from the compromised computer.
  23. Like
    Pyremius got a reaction from Shaheed the Gand in Slicing Remotely   
    My thoughts:
    Holonet Communicators:
    Bulky, power-hungry equipment, with exclusively point-to-point communication (laser, not radio).  Mid-stream interception is effectively impossible for two reasons: it's not broadcast, and it travels through hyperspace.  Connecting a rogue node is easy because it was originally a civilian system that was designed for growth; it only became a military tool when the Empire began restricting its use, and they haven't re-engineered the entire system (and replaced all the existing nodes).  The difficult part of setting up a rogue node is convincing anyone who notices the new connection to not bother assigning a Star Destroyer to check it out before you can relocate.  To flesh the design out a little further: the original design had core nodes with well-publicized "addresses": any new node would initially connect to one of them, and then download an up-to-date list of closer nodes to connect to.  Star Destroyers don't actually initiate communication directly with each other via Holonet: they connect back to fixed-location communication stations that have the processing power needed to update the target's location, and records of where the rest of the fleet was last located.  Potentially, it's not possible to use the Holonet while moving, whichever you prefer.  In either case, it would make sense that you can't initiate a Holonet transmission to a ship unless it hasn't moved since you last received its location.

    Wireless networks:
    Not normally used for security reasons.  With the ubiquity of computing equipment, the shear volume of people in society (if one person in a million is a computer-literate thief, how many are there in a society of hundreds of trillions?), and the phenomenal number of droids, any wireless channels into the typical network will be isolated in the strongest ways possible from anything of real value - with intrusion detection being an even higher priority (I don't have to keep you out of my network.  I only have to get you arrested/killed before you get to my data).  Pick your preferred explanation for why physical access equates to "slicing is possible".  The solution for "the guy in the chair" then is as described above: portable wireless interfaces.  Plug one into the target and you get to use your wireless network instead of theirs (bypassing their wireless security) on their physical network.  The downside (for the GM to exploit) is that there's now a rogue wireless signal in the area; depending on the security level it might have a chance of being noticed (possible setback dice, and a use for Despair).  One upside for the players is they can plug one in and then head in a different direction to keep attention away from the compromised computer.
  24. Like
    Pyremius got a reaction from Archlyte in Slicing Remotely   
    My thoughts:
    Holonet Communicators:
    Bulky, power-hungry equipment, with exclusively point-to-point communication (laser, not radio).  Mid-stream interception is effectively impossible for two reasons: it's not broadcast, and it travels through hyperspace.  Connecting a rogue node is easy because it was originally a civilian system that was designed for growth; it only became a military tool when the Empire began restricting its use, and they haven't re-engineered the entire system (and replaced all the existing nodes).  The difficult part of setting up a rogue node is convincing anyone who notices the new connection to not bother assigning a Star Destroyer to check it out before you can relocate.  To flesh the design out a little further: the original design had core nodes with well-publicized "addresses": any new node would initially connect to one of them, and then download an up-to-date list of closer nodes to connect to.  Star Destroyers don't actually initiate communication directly with each other via Holonet: they connect back to fixed-location communication stations that have the processing power needed to update the target's location, and records of where the rest of the fleet was last located.  Potentially, it's not possible to use the Holonet while moving, whichever you prefer.  In either case, it would make sense that you can't initiate a Holonet transmission to a ship unless it hasn't moved since you last received its location.

    Wireless networks:
    Not normally used for security reasons.  With the ubiquity of computing equipment, the shear volume of people in society (if one person in a million is a computer-literate thief, how many are there in a society of hundreds of trillions?), and the phenomenal number of droids, any wireless channels into the typical network will be isolated in the strongest ways possible from anything of real value - with intrusion detection being an even higher priority (I don't have to keep you out of my network.  I only have to get you arrested/killed before you get to my data).  Pick your preferred explanation for why physical access equates to "slicing is possible".  The solution for "the guy in the chair" then is as described above: portable wireless interfaces.  Plug one into the target and you get to use your wireless network instead of theirs (bypassing their wireless security) on their physical network.  The downside (for the GM to exploit) is that there's now a rogue wireless signal in the area; depending on the security level it might have a chance of being noticed (possible setback dice, and a use for Despair).  One upside for the players is they can plug one in and then head in a different direction to keep attention away from the compromised computer.
  25. Haha
    Pyremius got a reaction from HistoryGuy in Lightsaber construction in endless vigil   
    The only thing unique about Anakin's lightsaber(s) appears to have been the multi-digit personal ID# he needed to know how many he'd previously lost/broken.
×
×
  • Create New...