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djext1

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  1. Like
    djext1 got a reaction from ZorinIchiona in So is this the lazy answer to more FFG RPG's?   
    I think after playing with the narrative system in the Star Wars books, a lot of people (myself included) really wanted a generic system which uses the narrative dice.  Much like savage worlds, when you have the core rules in place, the door is wide open for both "official" and "fanmade" settings which are endless.  The star wars IP limited FFG as to what they could and couldn't do with material.  With this Genesys system, they can provide much more support in the digital realm for GMs and players which would be awesome.
    I can't wait to see what floodgate this book opens   
  2. Like
    djext1 got a reaction from RedJediKnight in So is this the lazy answer to more FFG RPG's?   
    I think after playing with the narrative system in the Star Wars books, a lot of people (myself included) really wanted a generic system which uses the narrative dice.  Much like savage worlds, when you have the core rules in place, the door is wide open for both "official" and "fanmade" settings which are endless.  The star wars IP limited FFG as to what they could and couldn't do with material.  With this Genesys system, they can provide much more support in the digital realm for GMs and players which would be awesome.
    I can't wait to see what floodgate this book opens   
  3. Like
    djext1 got a reaction from SEApocalypse in So is this the lazy answer to more FFG RPG's?   
    I think after playing with the narrative system in the Star Wars books, a lot of people (myself included) really wanted a generic system which uses the narrative dice.  Much like savage worlds, when you have the core rules in place, the door is wide open for both "official" and "fanmade" settings which are endless.  The star wars IP limited FFG as to what they could and couldn't do with material.  With this Genesys system, they can provide much more support in the digital realm for GMs and players which would be awesome.
    I can't wait to see what floodgate this book opens   
  4. Like
    djext1 got a reaction from TechnoGolem in So is this the lazy answer to more FFG RPG's?   
    I think after playing with the narrative system in the Star Wars books, a lot of people (myself included) really wanted a generic system which uses the narrative dice.  Much like savage worlds, when you have the core rules in place, the door is wide open for both "official" and "fanmade" settings which are endless.  The star wars IP limited FFG as to what they could and couldn't do with material.  With this Genesys system, they can provide much more support in the digital realm for GMs and players which would be awesome.
    I can't wait to see what floodgate this book opens   
  5. Like
    djext1 got a reaction from benskywalker in So is this the lazy answer to more FFG RPG's?   
    I think after playing with the narrative system in the Star Wars books, a lot of people (myself included) really wanted a generic system which uses the narrative dice.  Much like savage worlds, when you have the core rules in place, the door is wide open for both "official" and "fanmade" settings which are endless.  The star wars IP limited FFG as to what they could and couldn't do with material.  With this Genesys system, they can provide much more support in the digital realm for GMs and players which would be awesome.
    I can't wait to see what floodgate this book opens   
  6. Like
    djext1 got a reaction from Richardbuxton in So is this the lazy answer to more FFG RPG's?   
    I think after playing with the narrative system in the Star Wars books, a lot of people (myself included) really wanted a generic system which uses the narrative dice.  Much like savage worlds, when you have the core rules in place, the door is wide open for both "official" and "fanmade" settings which are endless.  The star wars IP limited FFG as to what they could and couldn't do with material.  With this Genesys system, they can provide much more support in the digital realm for GMs and players which would be awesome.
    I can't wait to see what floodgate this book opens   
  7. Like
    djext1 got a reaction from TheGMSource in So is this the lazy answer to more FFG RPG's?   
    I think after playing with the narrative system in the Star Wars books, a lot of people (myself included) really wanted a generic system which uses the narrative dice.  Much like savage worlds, when you have the core rules in place, the door is wide open for both "official" and "fanmade" settings which are endless.  The star wars IP limited FFG as to what they could and couldn't do with material.  With this Genesys system, they can provide much more support in the digital realm for GMs and players which would be awesome.
    I can't wait to see what floodgate this book opens   
  8. Like
    djext1 got a reaction from Disgruntled in So is this the lazy answer to more FFG RPG's?   
    I think after playing with the narrative system in the Star Wars books, a lot of people (myself included) really wanted a generic system which uses the narrative dice.  Much like savage worlds, when you have the core rules in place, the door is wide open for both "official" and "fanmade" settings which are endless.  The star wars IP limited FFG as to what they could and couldn't do with material.  With this Genesys system, they can provide much more support in the digital realm for GMs and players which would be awesome.
    I can't wait to see what floodgate this book opens   
  9. Like
    djext1 got a reaction from themensch in Interpreting the dice   
    http://feeds.feedburner.com/Order66  Go here and give a listen to the 2 part celebrity skype game.  It's a great example of how to interpret the dice. Once you and your group start doing it, the easier it gets.  This is what helped me as GM understand what can and can't do with various results, including prodding players to come up with thier own ideas for what happens.
  10. Like
    djext1 got a reaction from kaosoe in Edge of Empire system in other settings   
    My wish is that FFG would make a generic narrative dice system core book, then sell setting books for ALL THE THINGS!!  Basically a narrative dice system GURPS.   Then the sky's the limit on settings.  Kung fu, sci fi, western, steampunk, fantasy, superheroes, horror, modern, cyberpunk, zombie, etc etc etc...  
  11. Like
    djext1 got a reaction from TXRyanLee in Edge of Empire system in other settings   
    My wish is that FFG would make a generic narrative dice system core book, then sell setting books for ALL THE THINGS!!  Basically a narrative dice system GURPS.   Then the sky's the limit on settings.  Kung fu, sci fi, western, steampunk, fantasy, superheroes, horror, modern, cyberpunk, zombie, etc etc etc...  
  12. Like
    djext1 got a reaction from progressions in Game Master Improv   
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7GqPt8dKOGQ   This one from Dicestormers I enjoyed. 
  13. Like
    djext1 got a reaction from bradknowles in Game Master Improv   
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7GqPt8dKOGQ   This one from Dicestormers I enjoyed. 
  14. Like
    djext1 got a reaction from themensch in Game Master Improv   
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7GqPt8dKOGQ   This one from Dicestormers I enjoyed. 
  15. Like
    djext1 got a reaction from kaosoe in Combat: Personal weapons vs. Vehicle   
    Ha!
  16. Like
    djext1 got a reaction from Raistlinrox in Un-red Core Books   
    I was actually pleasantly surprised to find my copy being a sort of darker red, almost brick red with gray text. I always thought the bright red was hideous looking. I much more prefer the warmer tones :-)
  17. Like
    djext1 reacted to Doc, the Weasel in Age of Rebellion Talent Sheets   
    I have prepared the talent sheets for Age of Rebellion, as well as made some updates to the Edge of the Empire sheets.
     
    You can find them at the Begging for XP site:
    http://beggingforxp.com/2014/star-wars-talent-sheets/
     
    Enjoy.
     
  18. Like
    djext1 reacted to TXRyanLee in Good Roleplay Habits   
    Sorry about the novel. Not sure where I got this, but this is one of the best lists. - Ryan

    ONE:  Do Stuff

    Job One for you as a player is to do stuff; you should be thinking, at all times – “What are my goals? And what can I do to achieve them?” You are the stars of a very personal universe, and you are not going to get anywhere by sitting on your arse and waiting for adventure to come and knock on your door.

    Investigate stuff. Ask questions. Follow leads. No-one needs you to point out that this is an obvious plot thread while you do it. Mix up scenes, talk to people, get up in their grill. If you’re not playing the sort of character that would do such a thing, find something you can affect, and affect it.

    If you keep finding yourself pushed to the back of scenes and twiddling your thumbs – why is such a boring character hanging around with the sort of people that Get Stuff Done?

    Be active, not passive. If you learn nothing else from this article, bloody learn this.

    TWO: Realize that your character does not exist outside of the things you have said.

    You can write as many pages of backstory as you like, mate, but they don’t factor in one bit to the game unless you show them happening. Are you a shrewd businessman? Cool. Do some business, shrewdly, in front of everyone else. Are you a hot jazz saxophonist? Play the saxophone. Are you a wild elf struggling through social interactions with civilised people? Struggle through those interactions! Don’t go off and sit in a tree, you prick!

    This ties back into the first point, really; you only exist through your actions. It is not the responsibility of other players to read your backstory, and their characters cannot read minds. Well. Some of them can, but you know what I mean. They shouldn’t have to.

    So display your talents, your traits, your weaknesses, your connections. Take every opportunity to show, and not tell, the other people at the table what your character is about.

    THREE: Don’t try to stop things.

    Negating another player’s actions is fairly useless play; it takes two possible story-changing elements and whacks them against each other so hard that neither of them works. For example, your fighter wants to punch some jerk, but your monk’s against it, so he grabs the fighter’s hand. In game terms, nothing’s happened. All you’ve done is waste time, and we don’t have infinite supplies of that.

    Instead, go with the flow. Build. If the fighter wants to break someone’s nose, what happens after that? Does your monk rush to help the jerk up? To admonish the fighter? To apologise to the jerk’s friends, before trouble really kicks off? To save the fighter in the big brawl that ensues, even though he was going against your will? Or to throw the biggest guy in the tavern right at him, to really teach him a lesson? Those are all examples of interesting stories. Stopping him from doing anything whatsoever isn’t.

    Don’t negate, extrapolate. (See, that rhymes, so it’s easier to remember)

    FOUR: Take full control of your character.

    “My character wouldn’t do that” is a boring excuse, a massive NO to the game’s story on a fundamental level. It’s a point-blank refusal to participate.

    Instead of being bound by pre-conceived notions of what your character would and would not do, embrace complications and do it, but try to work out why. Why is your Rogue doing this mission for the church? Does he have ulterior motives? Is it out of a sense of companionship with the rest of the party? Characters in uncomfortable situations are the meat and drink of drama.

    (Do you remember that great story about that hobbit who told Gandalf to screw himself, and sat at home picking his hairy toes all day before his entire village was swallowed up by the armies of darkness? No. No you bloody don’t. So put on your backpack and get out there, Frodo)

    If you keep finding yourself having to explain your actions, or not wanting to go along with group decisions because of your character’s motives… well, sweetheart, maybe your character’s motives are wrong. They’re not written in stone. The group’s the thing, not your snowflake character, and if they’re not working, drop them off at the next village and maybe try playing someone more open to new ideas. Maybe work with the group to build a character that fits in.

    Your character is part of the story; this is not your character’s story.

    FIVE: Don’t harm other players.

    Oh ho, here’s a jolly thief that nicks stuff from the other party members! And their Sleight of Hand roll is so high that no-one will ever notice! Gosh, what a jape.

    Forget that guy. No-one likes that guy. (That guy generally plays Kender, and I am fully of the opinion that Kender should be promptly genocided out of all RPGs. I don’t think genocide is a crime if we’re talking about Kender.) If you steal from other players, you are exerting power over them in a really messy, underhanded sort of way. If they find out, what are they going to do? Are you going to force them to escalate? Is it fair if they kill you for it? Is that fun for them?

    Similarly, attacking other players is awful, too. I’m okay with this where systems fully support and encourage this, of course – something like Paranoia or Dogs in the Vineyard – but, Christ guys, give it a rest. I am hard-pressed to think of a way where such a thing improves the game; if your group is fine with it, discuss it beforehand. But keep me out of it.

    There are a whole load of things out there to steal from and beat up and kill that won’t get offended when you do it to them, so go bother them first.

    SIX: Know the system, don’t be a jerk about it.

    If you know a system, you are easier to GM for, because you know your character’s limitations. You can calculate the rough odds of a particular action succeeding or failing, just like in real life. You can make prompt assessments of situations and act accordingly, because you understand the rules of the world.

    (New players, of course, get a free pass on this one. But do make an effort to learn the rules, obviously, if you’re keen on sticking around in the hobby.)

    But for the love of God, don’t rules-lawyer. Do not do that. It is not hard to work out, because here is a simple guide – if you are arguing over a rule for more than twenty seconds, you are a rules lawyer. You are the Health and Safety Inspector of roleplaying games, and you need to stop talking, because you are sucking the fun out of the game.

    There are times when the rules are wrong, and that’s fine, but I’m hard-pressed to think of that time the guy remembered the rule and we all laughed and had a great time because he made the GM change it.

    SEVEN: Give the game your attention. If you can’t give your full attention, step away from the table.

    Hey! What’s that you’re playing, on your phone there? Oh, is it Candy Crush Saga? That’s funny, all these dice and character sheets gave me the impression that we were playing a tabletop role-playing game, I must be terribly mistaken.

    It is hard to think of a way to be more dismissive of someone’s game than playing a different game during it. If you find yourself getting so bored by what’s going on you’re resorting to playing a game on your phone, or reading a book, or checking Facebook, then step away from the game. You are draining the group with your very presence. I would rather have an empty chair than someone who wasn’t paying attention, because I don’t have to entertain an empty chair.

    And of course, it’s up to the GM to offer an entertaining game. This is not one-sided. But going back to point one, act whenever you can. Give them something to work with. Unless you’re paying them money to do this, they are under no obligation to dance like a monkey for you just because they’re behind the screen.

    EIGHT: If you make someone uncomfortable, apologize and talk to them about it.

    I have a rule in my games, and that rule is: “Nothing sexes anything else.” Simple. Clean. Elegant. No sexual conduct; it’s weird, often. I’ve had seduction attempts, obviously, and that’s fine. I’ve had characters deeply affected by ****. I’ve even had someone negotiate time with a skin-thief alien to reanimate a cat for the purposes of sexual pleasure as part of a heist. But, and this is the crucial thing here, nothing screwed anything else “onscreen.”

    And that’s the point; in situations like the ones we find ourselves in on a weekly basis, it’s easy to make people feel uncomfortable. Maybe it’s as blatant as discussing dead babies or ****; maybe it’s something much more benign, like being rude or chatting them up in-character.

    If you think you might have upset someone, then ask ‘em, quietly. And if you have, apologize, and stop talking about that particular thing. It’s not rocket science; that’s how existing as a functioning social human being works, and somehow because we’re pretending to be a halfling for a bit, we often forget how to do it.

    So, you know, be nice. Be extra nice. No-one’s going to think any less of you for it.

    NINE: Be a Storyteller.

    The World of Darkness books call their GM a Storyteller, because they are very obviously unable to call a spade a spade. But they have a point; a GM is telling stories. It’s easy to forget that the players are doing that too.

    So put some effort in, eh? Say some words. Develop a character voice and stance. Describe your actions. Work out a level of agency with the GM so you can chip into wider descriptions, or just make assumptions and describe it and see if it sticks. A good GM should go with what you’re saying, anyway, unless it really goes against their plan.

    Similarly, brevity = soul of wit, and all that. A good GM doesn’t monologue, or have their NPCs have long discussions, or make players sit back and watch while their world plays out. So know when to shut up, and to keep your descriptions short – unless you’re an incredible storyteller, of course. But short and punchy is always better than long and flowery.

    TEN: Embrace failure.

    Failure can be embarrassing. I know that I get pretty heated up when the dice don’t favour me – when I’ve spent ages waiting to have my turn in a large game, say, or when I’m using some special power, or when I’ve been talking a big talk for a while or described some fancy action – and I use some pretty bad language, too. And not “fun” bad language, like we all do when we’re gaming. Like threatening “is this guy okay” bad.

    And that’s not cool. I need to learn to treat failure as a story branch, not a block. Why did I miss? Why didn’t my intimidation roll work? Why didn’t I pick the lock? Why was I seen? Who worked out that I’m the traitor? What other options can I explore?

    Some systems build this in by default – Apocalypse World, for example – and they give you the ability to somehow affect the world whenever you roll the dice, not just fail to affect someone’s Hit Points. That’s great! We need to get ourselves into that mindset by default. We need to view failures as setbacks and explain why our character didn’t achieve their goal, and we need to understand that failure is not the end of the world.

    ELEVEN: Play the game.

    This is a game. This is not a challenge that exists solely in the head of your GM. This is not your character’s personal story arc. This is not your blog. This is not an excuse to chat up one of the other players. This is not a table to sit at in silence. This is a game.

    We have signed up to play a game together. We are all telling a story with each other, to each other, and the story comes first. Step back from the heat of combat; step back from your character’s difficult relationship with their half-Drow mother; step back from the way that the Paladin’s player keeps stealing your dice.

    This is a game. Respect the other players. Respect the story, and act in service of it. Respect that you will not always get your way, and that not getting your way can be interesting.

    Do what is best for the game. Do what is best for the story. Be active! Be positive! Be interesting! Change things! If you can’t walk away at the end of the night with a good memory, with something that you could talk about in the pub in years to come, then everyone at the table has failed.
  19. Like
    djext1 got a reaction from 12 Parsecs in Our attempt a GMless Edge game   
    So we decided to try a themed GMless Edge game for fun, and to see how it would play out.  We decided that there needed to be at least a little bit of structure in the collaborative process, and I narrowed it down to only 3 things. 
    Scene controller - This person sets the initial scene and setting, as well as pushing the scene along during the game. The troublemaker - The troublemaker finds spots that may need some conflict or problem to be solved or dealt with throughout the game. NPC/Combat facilitator - This person hands out the NPC roles to players as needed, as well as playing the part of the adversary during combat. We determined this by having each player roll 3 green dice and assigning slot 1-3 from highest on down.  Now, some other mechanics might need ironed out a bit, but this seemed to cover the bases pretty well.  We decided on the theme of junkie Bith rockers who happen to be FR3 with no moral compass whatsoever.  Again, this was for fun and the intention was just to cut loose and have ridiculous things play out.  So with zero prep other than character creation and concept....we ran the first one. 
     
    Bith Sith: Galaxy of Vengeance
     
    We had a lot of fun playing it and really can't wait to do more episodes.  I know this isn't groundbreaking or anything, as there are a lot of GMless games out there that do this 10x better, but none of us have played any of them, and just pretty much winged it.  
     
    Let us know what you think, or if you have any ideas or suggestions we'd love to hear them.  This is all new ground for us but we quickly latched on to the GMless thing and like it.
  20. Like
    djext1 got a reaction from Tear44 in Our attempt a GMless Edge game   
    So we decided to try a themed GMless Edge game for fun, and to see how it would play out.  We decided that there needed to be at least a little bit of structure in the collaborative process, and I narrowed it down to only 3 things. 
    Scene controller - This person sets the initial scene and setting, as well as pushing the scene along during the game. The troublemaker - The troublemaker finds spots that may need some conflict or problem to be solved or dealt with throughout the game. NPC/Combat facilitator - This person hands out the NPC roles to players as needed, as well as playing the part of the adversary during combat. We determined this by having each player roll 3 green dice and assigning slot 1-3 from highest on down.  Now, some other mechanics might need ironed out a bit, but this seemed to cover the bases pretty well.  We decided on the theme of junkie Bith rockers who happen to be FR3 with no moral compass whatsoever.  Again, this was for fun and the intention was just to cut loose and have ridiculous things play out.  So with zero prep other than character creation and concept....we ran the first one. 
     
    Bith Sith: Galaxy of Vengeance
     
    We had a lot of fun playing it and really can't wait to do more episodes.  I know this isn't groundbreaking or anything, as there are a lot of GMless games out there that do this 10x better, but none of us have played any of them, and just pretty much winged it.  
     
    Let us know what you think, or if you have any ideas or suggestions we'd love to hear them.  This is all new ground for us but we quickly latched on to the GMless thing and like it.
  21. Like
    djext1 got a reaction from kaosoe in Examples of two handed combat checks   
    My scoundrel uses it almost all the time in a serious firefight.  It's always worth trying to use it, sort of like 'aim'.  I mean, if you hit with the first, and and get your advantage to hit with the second it's a nice take down
     
    Just remember:  Apply your damage from each weapon separately...  That means each attack has to be mitigated by the soak on it's own.  I know that sounds basic, but believe me, it's easy for someone to not think about it and add all the damage from both weapons together into one hit.  It doesn't work like that
     
    And yeah, like it's been stated before, you really sort of need to have the dice pool to make this worthwhile.  Rolling something like GGY, probably isn't going to be worth the extra difficulty added.  But if you're tossing something like my scoundrel, YYYG or better...hell yeah it's worth using!
  22. Like
    djext1 got a reaction from Tear44 in Examples of two handed combat checks   
    My scoundrel uses it almost all the time in a serious firefight.  It's always worth trying to use it, sort of like 'aim'.  I mean, if you hit with the first, and and get your advantage to hit with the second it's a nice take down
     
    Just remember:  Apply your damage from each weapon separately...  That means each attack has to be mitigated by the soak on it's own.  I know that sounds basic, but believe me, it's easy for someone to not think about it and add all the damage from both weapons together into one hit.  It doesn't work like that
     
    And yeah, like it's been stated before, you really sort of need to have the dice pool to make this worthwhile.  Rolling something like GGY, probably isn't going to be worth the extra difficulty added.  But if you're tossing something like my scoundrel, YYYG or better...hell yeah it's worth using!
  23. Like
    djext1 got a reaction from ddbrown30 in Examples of two handed combat checks   
    Yeah, basically -
    2 of the same weapon : +1 difficulty 2 different weapons : +2 difficulty For different ranges of the attack, even if it's the same weapon type, I believe you would use the hardest difficulty of the two as your base difficulty, then apply the difficulty modifiers for DW.
  24. Like
    djext1 got a reaction from Kshatriya in NPC Combat Attacks   
    Yeah, like someone above mentioned, don't forget the Talents.  If you take some time and look through the talent trees, you'll see a lot of things like dodge, sidestep, etc....  These are things players can 'activate' on their turn so when they DO get fired upon, these things work sort of like defensive rolls by simply increasing the difficulty or adding setback dice of the attacking NPC.  It's different, but not that different.  It really works well, and as a GM you'll find just how much easier it is to run games in this narrative system.  GM work is a breeze lol
  25. Like
    djext1 got a reaction from Rikoshi in Episode 25 of the Order 66 Podcast is UP! Starship Combat with Sam Stewart...   
    I don't know.....   At the end of the day, these are just two guys who are RPGers, who love roleplaying games, star wars RPGs especially, and enjoy putting together a podcast about it.  Sure they are very much at the forefront of star wars RPG information, especially EotE, but they certainly aren't ambassadors of the genre, or of star wars, or of anything really.  They are guys that enjoy talking about star wars RPGs and provide a podcast with tips and info on it.  That's it.  I very much enjoy most of the podcasts and find them very helpful.  Maybe the "locker room" talk is just too much for some, for some it isn't. 
     
    I think to hijack Order 66's thread though to bash them and claim they are on par with Howard Stern or something though is pretty tacky.  There has been some good discussion though that hopefully Chris and Dave can take with them to help improve the show, maybe not.  But I guess my point is: Who cares?  It's their podcast and they can do with it what they like.  The fact that this has gone on for multiple pages though just astounds me....
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