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random-abstract

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  1. I like the "veils and walls" distinction. The reason I think WFRP is awesome, and sold all my D&D 4e to get it, is because of the high-resolution grittiness of it. I mention this here because I think that Disgruntled Owl's scenario of invading mercenaries is clear without having to mention [****]. Invading mercenaries are BAD and [****] is one of the many, unspoken reasons WHY. It doesn't need to be overtly mentioned or portrayed, but its unspoken presence adds substance to the role-playing. As a GM I can role-play townspeople who have a stake in outcomes all the better because I, too am a husband and a father. Greenskins and invading mercenaries are bad. Chaos in the world is BAD because it leads to loved ones being killed and enslaved and [raped] and tortured and eaten. I was always a make-up-the-whole-campaign-world guy, but now, aside from having too little time to do that, I"m sold on this setting that is so much easier to envision, and taste and SMELL than any D&D campaign ever was.
  2. 3WhiteFox3 said: Greedo is Good said: For those who GM from word processing documents, here's an NPC stat-block that worked well for my second session. The cells expand as necessary and there's room for lots of skills, or talents or abilities or any combination thereof. It can be copied and pasted right into the text of an outline or whatever one uses. https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B1ePVf9x50N_WFNwSXFJUjNWdVU/edit The link you gave says that I have to get permission to use this. I think it's now set for anyone to grab it.
  3. For those who GM from word processing documents, here's an NPC stat-block that worked well for my second session. The cells expand as necessary and there's room for lots of skills, or talents or abilities or any combination thereof. It can be copied and pasted right into the text of an outline or whatever one uses. https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B1ePVf9x50N_WFNwSXFJUjNWdVU/edit
  4. I'm planning my second session and I created an NPC stat-block in table-form, to be inserted into a .odt doc (or whatever). How might I share it here?
  5. Nice. Our second session will be picking up right in the middle of the combat I described, so I'll see how well this works. The droid was nice enough to let the other PCs out of the airspeeder first.
  6. OB-1 said: @Greedo is Good: According to the rules for the Force Power: Move, an object deals 5 damage if size (silhuete) 0 and otherwise 10xsize (silhuete) damage. Remember that 1 damage in vehicle scale = 10 damage in personal scale. I would use the guidelines above to cover your situation: Airspeeder does 2 damage to bikes, bikes does 2 damage to airspeeder, both do 20 damage to targets on foot. Test this in practice. Only if results aren't satisfatory I would try to think alternative solutions. That's the simple answer I was looking for! The factor I was looking for is silhouette.
  7. I have a question regarding planetary vehicle combat: How should we handle it when one vehicle tries to ram another? In our first session, the droid attempted to ram the PCs' (rented) airspeeder into a few parked speeder bikes. I didn't have the remotest idea of how to handle that properly, so we improvised a temporary patch that I wouldn't like to repeat here. Another question is how we should have handled it when the same droid then attempted to hit one of said speeder bikes' pilot with the air speeder. In that case, using the updated rules as a guide, the pilot (planetary) check was opposed by the target's agility, and the guy was basically able to jump out of the way before getting creamed, but what might the damage have been otherwise? So it's two questions: What damage is done (to both vehicles) when one rams another? What damage is done to a target on foot when they get rammed by a vehicle?
  8. Do the rules for flying ships, and fighting other ships get terribly complex? Or are they more workable, but still satisfactory? Writing out so many thoughts about RPGs has made me realize that, in D20 games and the like I'm downright scared of allowing spontaneous combat sequences, knowing how they tend to suck all the oxygen out of a session and leave no time for anything else…
  9. Who knows how well the space-janitor does with the hyperdrive, but I think the whole point of this game is going to be that even the bounty hunter owes child support to somebody back in the Core, a noblewoman with a really good Imperial lawyer. Most of my assumptions are based on what I know about Warhammer Fantasy, and I wager that no career will rely too heavily on the combat element of the game. Also, the GM can always add the equivalents of misfortune and challenge dice to any roll for any reason he sees fit. A janitor who's feeling lucky can see how well the hyperdrive responds to his own common sense, with a couple of extra challenge dice thrown in, which will bring a greater chance of blowing up the ship…
  10. Ha ha ha! I think this is the other reason FFG has us starting in the Outer Rim! It's the grittiest, darkest, most comparable environment to the Old World in WFRP! The Warhammer rulebook says to those who seek out a lot of combat "get ready to create a lot of new characters." One shot won't always kill you, but it might! Especially if you were already wounded, because there are no healing surges and no resurrections. Like our Norwegian friend says, the best way to not get killed by blaster shots is to not be in front of them when they're fired! I like it. There's another thread discussing how Jedi aught to be more powerful than other characters. Maybe this will be how: they'll be the only characters who can get shot at a lot and not get killed outright! D20 characters are really powerful, and their kneecaps never get smashed in combat. Maybe I'd be more into Pathfinder or D&D 4e if I ever played in a campaign continuous enough to do all the levelling up that make those games interesting, but this narrativist stuff is more fun, and with higher stakes. Playing a Doctor will be a lot more interesting when your allies have describable injuries to treat and not just HP to regain. This first installment stands a chance of having a real Firefly feel to it…
  11. I'm still with Damocles on this one, i.e. there's a lot to be said for focusing on non-Jedi stuff for a while. At this point in the thread, however, a lot of other games have been mentioned, most of which I haven't played. It ends up bringing me back around to the mechanic of this one. The crappiest game in the world could still be cool if it were creative and well-run. That being said, I'm very interested in a great game-mechanic. Serenity's looked good in that it was simple. D20 is crunchy as cornflakes. The narrative dice pool is the mechanic that interests me as a player who doesn't want anything subtracted from the role-playing (let it be fast!) I don't like the role-playing to be a sort of second, parallel track to combat and stuff. D20 skill challenges, for example, are a band-aid to a system that is designed for running combat, combat, combat. With a narrative dice pool, combat is an option I don't have to be scared of because it's not going to send my game session down the rabbit hole. At the same time, my whole session could have no combat at all and it won't have to be a disappointment because the players still get to push a lot of their characters' buttons. They'll still be using the game's most interesting and well-developed mechanics whether they'r fighting or doing goofy stuff that we read in novels but aren't sure how to handle in terms of rules. Serenity's system (Weis' system… what's that called?) is simple so it won't interfere with storytelling, but this new system raises the stakes a bit. The dice pools won't interfere with storytelling, and they'll actually lend something to it that all the difficulty rating-based systems don't. (anytime FFG wants to cut me a check, I'll happily spread these ravings across more forums, and if they can't cut a check I'll accept WFRP expansions)
  12. Shakespeare, I don't doubt it for a minute. Hell, did the WEG version have a longer run than Wi zards? Of course it all comes down to a creative and well-run game. I just can't emphasize enough how much I love this generally narrativist turn that new game mechanics are taking. It's all I want to play. Trail of Cthulhu, Sorcerer, (Jedi) in the Vineyard, WHFRP, and now this. I've got a wife, a job and a two-year old. Even if I wanted to figure out all my multi-class feats for a Pathfinder game (which I don't, really), I wouldn't have the time. The fact is that I'm having more fun gaming in my thirties than I did in my teens, and much of it is because of these kinds of games. It's too fun.
  13. I hear you. I originally rejected West End Games' Star Wars RPG because they made every kind of Jedi possible except the real, full-fledged kind. Nonetheless, I like the approach they're taking, here. WotC's D20 version already did what you're saying, and they really didn't screw it up at all. Yet it didn't last very long, even with the sleek, streamlined Saga edition and everything. I'm of the sort that thinks D20 is too crunchy, too rules-laden. I'm of the sort that ditched D&D4e in favor of Warhammer Fantasy. This game is going to have plenty of structure, but all according to a narrativist concept. They have to set themselves apart from the previous two attempts at this RPG (can we agree the previous two attempts ultimately failed?). They've decided to hold us to the Outer Rim. If I were a developer, I would be aware that people are used to D20-type stuff, to "gamist" concepts (where combat scenarios threaten to dominate entire game sessions), and I would see fit to really point people in a different direction before letting out with everything. It might sound like I'm overthinking it, and no I'm not on the FFG payroll, but I am a teacher, and I know that a lot of people are going to pick up that pool of custom dice and throw them down for combat and skill checks like it's any old RPG. Outer Rim-types are unique, and their personal problems are of greater significance to them than empires or rebellions. Maybe by holding them to that kind of campaign at first, players can get the feel for what a narrativist game has that others don't. Not only is the Jedi installment coming later, so is the soldiers and pilots installment. The teacher in me says that people need to shift their habits from a gamist concept to a narrativist concept before taking on stuff like X-Wing battles and AT-ATs, or else it's just going to be more of the same. Because ultimately, if I were a developer, I would want my game's concept of the Jedi to blow all the others out of space.
  14. I'm so hyped about this I joined a games forum! I can't say enough about the custom dice, the "narrative dice pool." Waiting until the third installment to even touch Jedi… Damocles is right, an elegant solution. The narrative dice pool in Warhammer Fantasy is what has me playing anything except Call of Cthulhu and Sorcerer these days, and it's what a space-age RPG deserves, and Star Wars is the richest space-age setting we've got. Not to mention, once the Jedi installment is out, the only way to play the Force is with a narrative game mechanic like this. Right now, I use the Dogs in the Vineyard system, but for Jedi (Jedi in the Vineyard). It's like a narrative dice pool… it might be the only dice pool more narrative than FFG's, and it's a gorgeous system. The catch is that the game concept is such that ONLY Jedi are possible. There's no room in that system for other kinds of characters. Still, if WFRP is any example, I'll end up preferring FFG's. One thing: let's hope they don't try to balance Jedi against all the other sorts of characters. As a supergeek friend criticizes (I am but a geek adept), it was WotC's big mistake to try balancing Jedi with all the other classes. Jedi are more powerful than others, period. I wonder how they might open it up to more species? Does this book not ship until 8/27?
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