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tripecac

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  1. Like
    tripecac got a reaction from Zakk1121 in Canonical decks   
    Back in 2019 I made a point of playing LotR LCG at least once a week.  I made it through Mirkwood, Dwarrowdelf, and the Hobbit saga.  I then started Heirs of Numenor.  And that's where I got stuck.  Over and over I tried to beat "Peril in Pelargir" but never got close.  I dutifully smashed  my head against that scenario each weekend, but those sessions lost any semblance of "fun".  The frustration was most likely due to the fact that I refused to abandon my Dwarf decks.  I just didn't want to deck build.  I kept hoping I would get a lucky card draw, but it never happened.
    Then, for my 2020 New Year's resolution, I decided to finally start Gloomhaven (which I'd bought more than a year ago).  Once I got Gloomhaven unpacked and the rules read, I realised that Gloomhaven is not just a table hog, but a time hog... and that I really didn't have enough time (or mental energy) to play both Gloomhaven and LotR LCG on a weekly basis.  So, I decided for 2020 to focus on Gloomhaven and put LotR LCG on hold (or "hiatus"). 
    Although I haven't played LotR LCG since 2019, I still keep reading about it, listening to podcasts, and collecting the new packs and play mats.  It's a terrific game, and I am still passionate about it... even though I don't play it.
    But this brings me back to the top of canonical decks.
    Over and over as I listen to podcasts (particularly Card Talk), I think about how nice it would be to deck choosing rather than deck building.  I would much rather decide between one of a handful of pre-constructed themed decks... and not worry about making card choices myself.
    Gloomhaven has a little bit of deck building, but for level 1 characters your card choices are very limited... For example, for the Brute I think you need to pick 10 of 13 cards.  So you are basically just choosing 3 cards NOT to use.  This choice is very easy and fast compared to LotR LCG, where you have to select 50 cards from a set of many, many hundreds of cards.
    When I am starting a scenario in LotR LCG, I would like to pick a deck, try it a couple times, and if that doesn't work, pick a different deck.  Nice and easy.  I don't want to have to choose cards.  At least, not until I have A LOT more experience with different deck types.  Right now I just know Dwarves (Dwarrowdelf and Hobbit saga), since I don't really count those sloppy hodge podge decks I played back during the Mirkwood cycle.  Dwarves were the first "real" decks I played, and so far remain the only "real" decks I've played.  I've never tried decks based on Hobbits, Elves, Eagles, Outlands, or any of the other themes.  Just Dwarves.  And that's because I do not enjoy building decks from scratch.  At all!
    So...  Have there been any efforts recently in getting together some "canonical decks"? 
    For example, I'd love something that would help me tackle Heirs of Numenor... as long as it's progression-style (at least at the cycle level, if not the pack level) and relatively thematic.  I'm guessing it would be Outlands, since that's the archetype introduced in this cycle.  I don't mind using cards from later in the cycle, so is there a "canonical" Outlands deck which is designed to get through this cycle?
  2. Like
    tripecac got a reaction from JonG in Momentum   
    Okay, on the topic of momentum, I have a long-overdue update. 
    Over the past 6 years, I have been playing LotR LCG off and on, almost exclusively on OCTGN (though I continue to collect the cards). 
    Most of my progress was made during overseas trips (in 2014 and 2018) when I was limited to a laptop which couldn't play "real" video games .  During those trips I played LotR LCG on OCTGN, gradually progressing through the Mirkwood cycle.  Whenever I returned from those trips, however, I would go back to playing other games, and didn't really pick up LotR LCG again until my next overseas trip.  So, I often restarted with Passage through Mirkwood.
    However, in 2019 something changed.  I've been listening to new podcasts about LotR LCG, which keep me inspired.  And BGG is a great source of "reminders" about the game.  So, for whatever reason, a few months ago I started playing LotR LCG again, on weekend mornings.  My goal was one quest per week. 
    And guess what... I've stuck with it!  Playing once a week is frequent enough to keep the rules fresh in my head (which reduces overhead), but not frequent enough to feel like a "chore" or cause burnout.  It's a comfortable frequency.
    Right now I'm in the Dwarrowdelf cycle.  Yesterday I finished The Long Dark.  This is now the farthest I've ever gotten in LotR LCG!!!  After all these years, I am finally progressing into new content.  So, playing once a week has helped maintain momentum.
    However, there is another factor: I have created my first "good" deck (or rather, a pair of decks, since I play 2-handed): Dwarves!  Dain helps glue this deck together, and so far, several missions into the Khazad Dum/Dwarrowdelf quests, I haven't needed to rebuild my decks!  This also reduces the overhead of playing LotR, and gets rid of the most stressful part of the game for me, which is deck building (since I hate the process of removing cool cards from decks, and so many cards seem cool to me!).
    So, those 2 things have helped me maintain momentum for the longest period of time so far:
    1) playing once a week, and
    2) playing a "good" deck (which doesn't need to be tweaked between scenarios)
    Hopefully this update will help other people in similar situations find ways to establish their momentum too! 
    It feels great to be finally making progress in this game!
  3. Like
    tripecac got a reaction from TheSpitfired in Momentum   
    Just a quick update...
    I have stuck with the once-a-week routine, and it's been working out great!  The Hobbit Saga has been a real pain to get through, though.  I am finding its quests much more difficult and frustrating than the Dwarrowdelf ones.  That said, it's neat having Bilbo floating around on the edges.
    Despite, or perhaps because of, the frustrating scenarios of the Hobbit Saga, I'm very glad I've been forcing myself to stick with the once-a-week schedule.  If I hadn't created that "rule" for myself, I suspect I would have skipped a weekend or two or three or... and wouldn't have made as much progress as I have.
    So, although "momentum" requires effort, it does have the benefit of ensuring an overall sense of progress through the game, and plus, even the hardest, nastiest quests have their fun moments.  I love it when my Dwarf swarm is finally kicking butt... and I love that sense of relief when I finally beat a quest I've lost repeatedly.  Those infrequent, "hard-earned" moments are very satisfying, and they wouldn't happen if I didn't "force" myself to maintain momentum.
    It's a truly great game.  A very hard one (for those of us who don't enjoy deck building) but also one that is very thought-provoking and emotionally/intellectually rewarding... when we finally win.
    TLDR: There is no winning without losing.  And there is no losing without playing.  So play.
  4. Like
    tripecac got a reaction from TwiceBorn in Momentum   
    Just a quick update...
    I have stuck with the once-a-week routine, and it's been working out great!  The Hobbit Saga has been a real pain to get through, though.  I am finding its quests much more difficult and frustrating than the Dwarrowdelf ones.  That said, it's neat having Bilbo floating around on the edges.
    Despite, or perhaps because of, the frustrating scenarios of the Hobbit Saga, I'm very glad I've been forcing myself to stick with the once-a-week schedule.  If I hadn't created that "rule" for myself, I suspect I would have skipped a weekend or two or three or... and wouldn't have made as much progress as I have.
    So, although "momentum" requires effort, it does have the benefit of ensuring an overall sense of progress through the game, and plus, even the hardest, nastiest quests have their fun moments.  I love it when my Dwarf swarm is finally kicking butt... and I love that sense of relief when I finally beat a quest I've lost repeatedly.  Those infrequent, "hard-earned" moments are very satisfying, and they wouldn't happen if I didn't "force" myself to maintain momentum.
    It's a truly great game.  A very hard one (for those of us who don't enjoy deck building) but also one that is very thought-provoking and emotionally/intellectually rewarding... when we finally win.
    TLDR: There is no winning without losing.  And there is no losing without playing.  So play.
  5. Like
    tripecac got a reaction from Zura in Momentum   
    Okay, on the topic of momentum, I have a long-overdue update. 
    Over the past 6 years, I have been playing LotR LCG off and on, almost exclusively on OCTGN (though I continue to collect the cards). 
    Most of my progress was made during overseas trips (in 2014 and 2018) when I was limited to a laptop which couldn't play "real" video games .  During those trips I played LotR LCG on OCTGN, gradually progressing through the Mirkwood cycle.  Whenever I returned from those trips, however, I would go back to playing other games, and didn't really pick up LotR LCG again until my next overseas trip.  So, I often restarted with Passage through Mirkwood.
    However, in 2019 something changed.  I've been listening to new podcasts about LotR LCG, which keep me inspired.  And BGG is a great source of "reminders" about the game.  So, for whatever reason, a few months ago I started playing LotR LCG again, on weekend mornings.  My goal was one quest per week. 
    And guess what... I've stuck with it!  Playing once a week is frequent enough to keep the rules fresh in my head (which reduces overhead), but not frequent enough to feel like a "chore" or cause burnout.  It's a comfortable frequency.
    Right now I'm in the Dwarrowdelf cycle.  Yesterday I finished The Long Dark.  This is now the farthest I've ever gotten in LotR LCG!!!  After all these years, I am finally progressing into new content.  So, playing once a week has helped maintain momentum.
    However, there is another factor: I have created my first "good" deck (or rather, a pair of decks, since I play 2-handed): Dwarves!  Dain helps glue this deck together, and so far, several missions into the Khazad Dum/Dwarrowdelf quests, I haven't needed to rebuild my decks!  This also reduces the overhead of playing LotR, and gets rid of the most stressful part of the game for me, which is deck building (since I hate the process of removing cool cards from decks, and so many cards seem cool to me!).
    So, those 2 things have helped me maintain momentum for the longest period of time so far:
    1) playing once a week, and
    2) playing a "good" deck (which doesn't need to be tweaked between scenarios)
    Hopefully this update will help other people in similar situations find ways to establish their momentum too! 
    It feels great to be finally making progress in this game!
  6. Like
    tripecac got a reaction from wernerkellens in Solo play?   
    I definitely prefer 2-handed, and would never go back to 1-handed. 
    If each hand uses 2 spheres, you have access to all 4 spheres, which means you never need to worry about "missing" any cards.
    Also, playing 2-handed means you have twice as many opportunities to boost not just one hand's cards but *both* hands' cards.  (For example, Dain boosts all dwarves in play, not just the dwarves belonging to Dain's hand/"player").
    Playing 2-handed might require a little more overhead, but it's not much, and the benefits will likely quickly overshadow the extra work.  At least, they did for me.
  7. Like
    tripecac got a reaction from GILLIES291 in Hobbit Saga - We Must Away Ere Break of Day - Problem with the ending!!! (spoilers)   
    I was finally doing well in the first Hobbit saga scenario (after 3 failed attempts).  This time, I was in Stage 2, had massive armies on both sides (I play 2 handed), had killed 2 trolls, and was itching kill the 3rd.
    Bilbo had Troll Purse attached, Troll Key was attached to the last troll, and Troll Cave was in the staging area.  So, all I had to do was grab the Troll Key, travel to the Troll Cave, and explore it.  That would take 2 turns max.  Bilbo was ready, and all I needed to do was damage the final troll with an attack.
    The first encounter card forced the troll to engage the player with Bilbo.  It sacked 2 characters, but I had so many that it didn't matter.
    All I needed to do was hit the troll.
    But then, when I resolved my questing, I saw that I had so much willpower that it completely emptied the encounter deck.  This forced me to go to Stage 3.  Which immediately ended the game.  Yikes.
    Since Troll Cave was not yet in the Victory display, my understanding is that this means I cannot discover Sting, Glamdring, and Orcrist, correct?
    This stinks!  I was doing so well... but I guess I ended up doing "too well"....
    Hmmm...

    And then I realised: this ending doesn't make sense.
    You see, by questing too well, I forced dawn to arrive, which froze the trolls. Okay, that's a little weird, but I can accept that. 
    However, what I don't like is this next bit:
    According to the game, since the trolls froze before I had explored the Troll Cave, I didn't have a chance of discovering the treasure.  No chance.  Zero.  Zip.  Never mind the fact that we had the purse, the last troll had the key, and the cave was right there in front of us (in the staging area).  It's as if the dwarves, in a fit of idiocy, decided to simply drop the purse, ignore the key, and ignore the cave.  "Oh well, job done, nothing more for us here, on to Erebor!"  No curiosity whatsoever.
    But this is opposite from the book!  In the book, the trolls were frozen before the cave was even discovered, right?  After the fight, the Dwarves explored a bit, and *then* found the cave.
    So why can't we explore the Troll Cave *after* eliminating the trolls?  That's what I was expecting to happen anyway, since it's consistent with the story.  (This was my first time seeing the third quest card, so the fact that the game ended immediately was a nasty surprise).
    I don't understand why the game forces us to explore the cave before finishing off the trolls.  That's just such an unexpected deviation from the book.  And, since familiarity with the book is part of the appeal of the saga expansion, it seems strange that the game would try to "trick" us like this, almost as if it is punishing us for trusting the book/lore too much.
    Is this why some people don't rate the Hobbit sagas highly?  Do these sort of thematic/gameplay conflicts recur throughout the Hobbit saga?  Or is this the worst offence? 
    Or did I completely read the game/quest wrong?  Am I missing something here?
  8. Like
    tripecac got a reaction from PigsAreOurEquals in Momentum   
    Okay, on the topic of momentum, I have a long-overdue update. 
    Over the past 6 years, I have been playing LotR LCG off and on, almost exclusively on OCTGN (though I continue to collect the cards). 
    Most of my progress was made during overseas trips (in 2014 and 2018) when I was limited to a laptop which couldn't play "real" video games .  During those trips I played LotR LCG on OCTGN, gradually progressing through the Mirkwood cycle.  Whenever I returned from those trips, however, I would go back to playing other games, and didn't really pick up LotR LCG again until my next overseas trip.  So, I often restarted with Passage through Mirkwood.
    However, in 2019 something changed.  I've been listening to new podcasts about LotR LCG, which keep me inspired.  And BGG is a great source of "reminders" about the game.  So, for whatever reason, a few months ago I started playing LotR LCG again, on weekend mornings.  My goal was one quest per week. 
    And guess what... I've stuck with it!  Playing once a week is frequent enough to keep the rules fresh in my head (which reduces overhead), but not frequent enough to feel like a "chore" or cause burnout.  It's a comfortable frequency.
    Right now I'm in the Dwarrowdelf cycle.  Yesterday I finished The Long Dark.  This is now the farthest I've ever gotten in LotR LCG!!!  After all these years, I am finally progressing into new content.  So, playing once a week has helped maintain momentum.
    However, there is another factor: I have created my first "good" deck (or rather, a pair of decks, since I play 2-handed): Dwarves!  Dain helps glue this deck together, and so far, several missions into the Khazad Dum/Dwarrowdelf quests, I haven't needed to rebuild my decks!  This also reduces the overhead of playing LotR, and gets rid of the most stressful part of the game for me, which is deck building (since I hate the process of removing cool cards from decks, and so many cards seem cool to me!).
    So, those 2 things have helped me maintain momentum for the longest period of time so far:
    1) playing once a week, and
    2) playing a "good" deck (which doesn't need to be tweaked between scenarios)
    Hopefully this update will help other people in similar situations find ways to establish their momentum too! 
    It feels great to be finally making progress in this game!
  9. Like
    tripecac got a reaction from Amicus Draconis in Shadow and Flame - Yikes! (SPOILERS)   
    I did it I did it I did it I did it I did it!!!!!
    I tweaked my Dain-centered deck, mostly removing event cards, since Durin's Bane' s Counter-spell discourages events.
    I then played again,  and this time managed to have several Dwarf allies out by the time I got to the black pit.  I took 2 turns smashing the Balrog, letting Frodo turn his side's attacks into threat.
    Finally, with Frodo's side having 38 threat, I let Durin's Bane have an undefended attack.  The shadow card was +3, and DB already had the +3 sword, so that was 12 damage.  If Frodo turned that into threat, that side would have 50 threat, and couldn't damage the Balrog back.  So I let Frodo die instead.
    We damaged DB so much that he had 29 damage markers on him.  Some googling determined that I should keep it at 29 instead of reducing it to DB's max health (27).  So the next turn he regenerated to 26 (instead of 24).  It didn't matter, because I exhausted 3 characters and drew 8 points.  Bye bye Durin's Bane, and bye bye Moria!
     
    This would have been much harder without Frodo.  It felt "wrong" to corrupt my Dwarf decks with a hobbit (and snowborne scouts and eagles) but I'm guessing we can't expect thematic decks to work with every scenario, at least when it seems we only have well-developed archetype at the time of Dwarrowdelf (Dwarves).
    Thoughts?
  10. Like
    tripecac got a reaction from Onidsen in Momentum   
    I've also been listening to Card Talk (one of the newer LotR LCG podcasts) which has been great because each episode is short, focused, and entertaining.  It's probably the "easiest to digest" LotR LCG podcast out there, and when it comes to this game, anything easy is good!  Plus, the show has a relaxed, humble, humorous feel to it.  It's like listening to two buddies talking about the game.  Highly recommended!
  11. Like
    tripecac got a reaction from icabod in Momentum   
    I've also been listening to Card Talk (one of the newer LotR LCG podcasts) which has been great because each episode is short, focused, and entertaining.  It's probably the "easiest to digest" LotR LCG podcast out there, and when it comes to this game, anything easy is good!  Plus, the show has a relaxed, humble, humorous feel to it.  It's like listening to two buddies talking about the game.  Highly recommended!
  12. Like
    tripecac got a reaction from icabod in Momentum   
    Okay, on the topic of momentum, I have a long-overdue update. 
    Over the past 6 years, I have been playing LotR LCG off and on, almost exclusively on OCTGN (though I continue to collect the cards). 
    Most of my progress was made during overseas trips (in 2014 and 2018) when I was limited to a laptop which couldn't play "real" video games .  During those trips I played LotR LCG on OCTGN, gradually progressing through the Mirkwood cycle.  Whenever I returned from those trips, however, I would go back to playing other games, and didn't really pick up LotR LCG again until my next overseas trip.  So, I often restarted with Passage through Mirkwood.
    However, in 2019 something changed.  I've been listening to new podcasts about LotR LCG, which keep me inspired.  And BGG is a great source of "reminders" about the game.  So, for whatever reason, a few months ago I started playing LotR LCG again, on weekend mornings.  My goal was one quest per week. 
    And guess what... I've stuck with it!  Playing once a week is frequent enough to keep the rules fresh in my head (which reduces overhead), but not frequent enough to feel like a "chore" or cause burnout.  It's a comfortable frequency.
    Right now I'm in the Dwarrowdelf cycle.  Yesterday I finished The Long Dark.  This is now the farthest I've ever gotten in LotR LCG!!!  After all these years, I am finally progressing into new content.  So, playing once a week has helped maintain momentum.
    However, there is another factor: I have created my first "good" deck (or rather, a pair of decks, since I play 2-handed): Dwarves!  Dain helps glue this deck together, and so far, several missions into the Khazad Dum/Dwarrowdelf quests, I haven't needed to rebuild my decks!  This also reduces the overhead of playing LotR, and gets rid of the most stressful part of the game for me, which is deck building (since I hate the process of removing cool cards from decks, and so many cards seem cool to me!).
    So, those 2 things have helped me maintain momentum for the longest period of time so far:
    1) playing once a week, and
    2) playing a "good" deck (which doesn't need to be tweaked between scenarios)
    Hopefully this update will help other people in similar situations find ways to establish their momentum too! 
    It feels great to be finally making progress in this game!
  13. Like
    tripecac got a reaction from ScottGilbert25 in Momentum   
    Okay, on the topic of momentum, I have a long-overdue update. 
    Over the past 6 years, I have been playing LotR LCG off and on, almost exclusively on OCTGN (though I continue to collect the cards). 
    Most of my progress was made during overseas trips (in 2014 and 2018) when I was limited to a laptop which couldn't play "real" video games .  During those trips I played LotR LCG on OCTGN, gradually progressing through the Mirkwood cycle.  Whenever I returned from those trips, however, I would go back to playing other games, and didn't really pick up LotR LCG again until my next overseas trip.  So, I often restarted with Passage through Mirkwood.
    However, in 2019 something changed.  I've been listening to new podcasts about LotR LCG, which keep me inspired.  And BGG is a great source of "reminders" about the game.  So, for whatever reason, a few months ago I started playing LotR LCG again, on weekend mornings.  My goal was one quest per week. 
    And guess what... I've stuck with it!  Playing once a week is frequent enough to keep the rules fresh in my head (which reduces overhead), but not frequent enough to feel like a "chore" or cause burnout.  It's a comfortable frequency.
    Right now I'm in the Dwarrowdelf cycle.  Yesterday I finished The Long Dark.  This is now the farthest I've ever gotten in LotR LCG!!!  After all these years, I am finally progressing into new content.  So, playing once a week has helped maintain momentum.
    However, there is another factor: I have created my first "good" deck (or rather, a pair of decks, since I play 2-handed): Dwarves!  Dain helps glue this deck together, and so far, several missions into the Khazad Dum/Dwarrowdelf quests, I haven't needed to rebuild my decks!  This also reduces the overhead of playing LotR, and gets rid of the most stressful part of the game for me, which is deck building (since I hate the process of removing cool cards from decks, and so many cards seem cool to me!).
    So, those 2 things have helped me maintain momentum for the longest period of time so far:
    1) playing once a week, and
    2) playing a "good" deck (which doesn't need to be tweaked between scenarios)
    Hopefully this update will help other people in similar situations find ways to establish their momentum too! 
    It feels great to be finally making progress in this game!
  14. Like
    tripecac got a reaction from TheSpitfired in Momentum   
    Okay, on the topic of momentum, I have a long-overdue update. 
    Over the past 6 years, I have been playing LotR LCG off and on, almost exclusively on OCTGN (though I continue to collect the cards). 
    Most of my progress was made during overseas trips (in 2014 and 2018) when I was limited to a laptop which couldn't play "real" video games .  During those trips I played LotR LCG on OCTGN, gradually progressing through the Mirkwood cycle.  Whenever I returned from those trips, however, I would go back to playing other games, and didn't really pick up LotR LCG again until my next overseas trip.  So, I often restarted with Passage through Mirkwood.
    However, in 2019 something changed.  I've been listening to new podcasts about LotR LCG, which keep me inspired.  And BGG is a great source of "reminders" about the game.  So, for whatever reason, a few months ago I started playing LotR LCG again, on weekend mornings.  My goal was one quest per week. 
    And guess what... I've stuck with it!  Playing once a week is frequent enough to keep the rules fresh in my head (which reduces overhead), but not frequent enough to feel like a "chore" or cause burnout.  It's a comfortable frequency.
    Right now I'm in the Dwarrowdelf cycle.  Yesterday I finished The Long Dark.  This is now the farthest I've ever gotten in LotR LCG!!!  After all these years, I am finally progressing into new content.  So, playing once a week has helped maintain momentum.
    However, there is another factor: I have created my first "good" deck (or rather, a pair of decks, since I play 2-handed): Dwarves!  Dain helps glue this deck together, and so far, several missions into the Khazad Dum/Dwarrowdelf quests, I haven't needed to rebuild my decks!  This also reduces the overhead of playing LotR, and gets rid of the most stressful part of the game for me, which is deck building (since I hate the process of removing cool cards from decks, and so many cards seem cool to me!).
    So, those 2 things have helped me maintain momentum for the longest period of time so far:
    1) playing once a week, and
    2) playing a "good" deck (which doesn't need to be tweaked between scenarios)
    Hopefully this update will help other people in similar situations find ways to establish their momentum too! 
    It feels great to be finally making progress in this game!
  15. Like
    tripecac got a reaction from old toby in Momentum   
    Okay, on the topic of momentum, I have a long-overdue update. 
    Over the past 6 years, I have been playing LotR LCG off and on, almost exclusively on OCTGN (though I continue to collect the cards). 
    Most of my progress was made during overseas trips (in 2014 and 2018) when I was limited to a laptop which couldn't play "real" video games .  During those trips I played LotR LCG on OCTGN, gradually progressing through the Mirkwood cycle.  Whenever I returned from those trips, however, I would go back to playing other games, and didn't really pick up LotR LCG again until my next overseas trip.  So, I often restarted with Passage through Mirkwood.
    However, in 2019 something changed.  I've been listening to new podcasts about LotR LCG, which keep me inspired.  And BGG is a great source of "reminders" about the game.  So, for whatever reason, a few months ago I started playing LotR LCG again, on weekend mornings.  My goal was one quest per week. 
    And guess what... I've stuck with it!  Playing once a week is frequent enough to keep the rules fresh in my head (which reduces overhead), but not frequent enough to feel like a "chore" or cause burnout.  It's a comfortable frequency.
    Right now I'm in the Dwarrowdelf cycle.  Yesterday I finished The Long Dark.  This is now the farthest I've ever gotten in LotR LCG!!!  After all these years, I am finally progressing into new content.  So, playing once a week has helped maintain momentum.
    However, there is another factor: I have created my first "good" deck (or rather, a pair of decks, since I play 2-handed): Dwarves!  Dain helps glue this deck together, and so far, several missions into the Khazad Dum/Dwarrowdelf quests, I haven't needed to rebuild my decks!  This also reduces the overhead of playing LotR, and gets rid of the most stressful part of the game for me, which is deck building (since I hate the process of removing cool cards from decks, and so many cards seem cool to me!).
    So, those 2 things have helped me maintain momentum for the longest period of time so far:
    1) playing once a week, and
    2) playing a "good" deck (which doesn't need to be tweaked between scenarios)
    Hopefully this update will help other people in similar situations find ways to establish their momentum too! 
    It feels great to be finally making progress in this game!
  16. Like
    tripecac got a reaction from GILLIES291 in Momentum   
    Okay, on the topic of momentum, I have a long-overdue update. 
    Over the past 6 years, I have been playing LotR LCG off and on, almost exclusively on OCTGN (though I continue to collect the cards). 
    Most of my progress was made during overseas trips (in 2014 and 2018) when I was limited to a laptop which couldn't play "real" video games .  During those trips I played LotR LCG on OCTGN, gradually progressing through the Mirkwood cycle.  Whenever I returned from those trips, however, I would go back to playing other games, and didn't really pick up LotR LCG again until my next overseas trip.  So, I often restarted with Passage through Mirkwood.
    However, in 2019 something changed.  I've been listening to new podcasts about LotR LCG, which keep me inspired.  And BGG is a great source of "reminders" about the game.  So, for whatever reason, a few months ago I started playing LotR LCG again, on weekend mornings.  My goal was one quest per week. 
    And guess what... I've stuck with it!  Playing once a week is frequent enough to keep the rules fresh in my head (which reduces overhead), but not frequent enough to feel like a "chore" or cause burnout.  It's a comfortable frequency.
    Right now I'm in the Dwarrowdelf cycle.  Yesterday I finished The Long Dark.  This is now the farthest I've ever gotten in LotR LCG!!!  After all these years, I am finally progressing into new content.  So, playing once a week has helped maintain momentum.
    However, there is another factor: I have created my first "good" deck (or rather, a pair of decks, since I play 2-handed): Dwarves!  Dain helps glue this deck together, and so far, several missions into the Khazad Dum/Dwarrowdelf quests, I haven't needed to rebuild my decks!  This also reduces the overhead of playing LotR, and gets rid of the most stressful part of the game for me, which is deck building (since I hate the process of removing cool cards from decks, and so many cards seem cool to me!).
    So, those 2 things have helped me maintain momentum for the longest period of time so far:
    1) playing once a week, and
    2) playing a "good" deck (which doesn't need to be tweaked between scenarios)
    Hopefully this update will help other people in similar situations find ways to establish their momentum too! 
    It feels great to be finally making progress in this game!
  17. Like
    tripecac got a reaction from Ywingscum in Momentum   
    Okay, on the topic of momentum, I have a long-overdue update. 
    Over the past 6 years, I have been playing LotR LCG off and on, almost exclusively on OCTGN (though I continue to collect the cards). 
    Most of my progress was made during overseas trips (in 2014 and 2018) when I was limited to a laptop which couldn't play "real" video games .  During those trips I played LotR LCG on OCTGN, gradually progressing through the Mirkwood cycle.  Whenever I returned from those trips, however, I would go back to playing other games, and didn't really pick up LotR LCG again until my next overseas trip.  So, I often restarted with Passage through Mirkwood.
    However, in 2019 something changed.  I've been listening to new podcasts about LotR LCG, which keep me inspired.  And BGG is a great source of "reminders" about the game.  So, for whatever reason, a few months ago I started playing LotR LCG again, on weekend mornings.  My goal was one quest per week. 
    And guess what... I've stuck with it!  Playing once a week is frequent enough to keep the rules fresh in my head (which reduces overhead), but not frequent enough to feel like a "chore" or cause burnout.  It's a comfortable frequency.
    Right now I'm in the Dwarrowdelf cycle.  Yesterday I finished The Long Dark.  This is now the farthest I've ever gotten in LotR LCG!!!  After all these years, I am finally progressing into new content.  So, playing once a week has helped maintain momentum.
    However, there is another factor: I have created my first "good" deck (or rather, a pair of decks, since I play 2-handed): Dwarves!  Dain helps glue this deck together, and so far, several missions into the Khazad Dum/Dwarrowdelf quests, I haven't needed to rebuild my decks!  This also reduces the overhead of playing LotR, and gets rid of the most stressful part of the game for me, which is deck building (since I hate the process of removing cool cards from decks, and so many cards seem cool to me!).
    So, those 2 things have helped me maintain momentum for the longest period of time so far:
    1) playing once a week, and
    2) playing a "good" deck (which doesn't need to be tweaked between scenarios)
    Hopefully this update will help other people in similar situations find ways to establish their momentum too! 
    It feels great to be finally making progress in this game!
  18. Like
    tripecac got a reaction from dragoncymru in Momentum   
    Okay, on the topic of momentum, I have a long-overdue update. 
    Over the past 6 years, I have been playing LotR LCG off and on, almost exclusively on OCTGN (though I continue to collect the cards). 
    Most of my progress was made during overseas trips (in 2014 and 2018) when I was limited to a laptop which couldn't play "real" video games .  During those trips I played LotR LCG on OCTGN, gradually progressing through the Mirkwood cycle.  Whenever I returned from those trips, however, I would go back to playing other games, and didn't really pick up LotR LCG again until my next overseas trip.  So, I often restarted with Passage through Mirkwood.
    However, in 2019 something changed.  I've been listening to new podcasts about LotR LCG, which keep me inspired.  And BGG is a great source of "reminders" about the game.  So, for whatever reason, a few months ago I started playing LotR LCG again, on weekend mornings.  My goal was one quest per week. 
    And guess what... I've stuck with it!  Playing once a week is frequent enough to keep the rules fresh in my head (which reduces overhead), but not frequent enough to feel like a "chore" or cause burnout.  It's a comfortable frequency.
    Right now I'm in the Dwarrowdelf cycle.  Yesterday I finished The Long Dark.  This is now the farthest I've ever gotten in LotR LCG!!!  After all these years, I am finally progressing into new content.  So, playing once a week has helped maintain momentum.
    However, there is another factor: I have created my first "good" deck (or rather, a pair of decks, since I play 2-handed): Dwarves!  Dain helps glue this deck together, and so far, several missions into the Khazad Dum/Dwarrowdelf quests, I haven't needed to rebuild my decks!  This also reduces the overhead of playing LotR, and gets rid of the most stressful part of the game for me, which is deck building (since I hate the process of removing cool cards from decks, and so many cards seem cool to me!).
    So, those 2 things have helped me maintain momentum for the longest period of time so far:
    1) playing once a week, and
    2) playing a "good" deck (which doesn't need to be tweaked between scenarios)
    Hopefully this update will help other people in similar situations find ways to establish their momentum too! 
    It feels great to be finally making progress in this game!
  19. Like
    tripecac got a reaction from Wandalf the Gizzard in Momentum   
    Okay, on the topic of momentum, I have a long-overdue update. 
    Over the past 6 years, I have been playing LotR LCG off and on, almost exclusively on OCTGN (though I continue to collect the cards). 
    Most of my progress was made during overseas trips (in 2014 and 2018) when I was limited to a laptop which couldn't play "real" video games .  During those trips I played LotR LCG on OCTGN, gradually progressing through the Mirkwood cycle.  Whenever I returned from those trips, however, I would go back to playing other games, and didn't really pick up LotR LCG again until my next overseas trip.  So, I often restarted with Passage through Mirkwood.
    However, in 2019 something changed.  I've been listening to new podcasts about LotR LCG, which keep me inspired.  And BGG is a great source of "reminders" about the game.  So, for whatever reason, a few months ago I started playing LotR LCG again, on weekend mornings.  My goal was one quest per week. 
    And guess what... I've stuck with it!  Playing once a week is frequent enough to keep the rules fresh in my head (which reduces overhead), but not frequent enough to feel like a "chore" or cause burnout.  It's a comfortable frequency.
    Right now I'm in the Dwarrowdelf cycle.  Yesterday I finished The Long Dark.  This is now the farthest I've ever gotten in LotR LCG!!!  After all these years, I am finally progressing into new content.  So, playing once a week has helped maintain momentum.
    However, there is another factor: I have created my first "good" deck (or rather, a pair of decks, since I play 2-handed): Dwarves!  Dain helps glue this deck together, and so far, several missions into the Khazad Dum/Dwarrowdelf quests, I haven't needed to rebuild my decks!  This also reduces the overhead of playing LotR, and gets rid of the most stressful part of the game for me, which is deck building (since I hate the process of removing cool cards from decks, and so many cards seem cool to me!).
    So, those 2 things have helped me maintain momentum for the longest period of time so far:
    1) playing once a week, and
    2) playing a "good" deck (which doesn't need to be tweaked between scenarios)
    Hopefully this update will help other people in similar situations find ways to establish their momentum too! 
    It feels great to be finally making progress in this game!
  20. Like
    tripecac got a reaction from Gizlivadi in Momentum   
    Okay, on the topic of momentum, I have a long-overdue update. 
    Over the past 6 years, I have been playing LotR LCG off and on, almost exclusively on OCTGN (though I continue to collect the cards). 
    Most of my progress was made during overseas trips (in 2014 and 2018) when I was limited to a laptop which couldn't play "real" video games .  During those trips I played LotR LCG on OCTGN, gradually progressing through the Mirkwood cycle.  Whenever I returned from those trips, however, I would go back to playing other games, and didn't really pick up LotR LCG again until my next overseas trip.  So, I often restarted with Passage through Mirkwood.
    However, in 2019 something changed.  I've been listening to new podcasts about LotR LCG, which keep me inspired.  And BGG is a great source of "reminders" about the game.  So, for whatever reason, a few months ago I started playing LotR LCG again, on weekend mornings.  My goal was one quest per week. 
    And guess what... I've stuck with it!  Playing once a week is frequent enough to keep the rules fresh in my head (which reduces overhead), but not frequent enough to feel like a "chore" or cause burnout.  It's a comfortable frequency.
    Right now I'm in the Dwarrowdelf cycle.  Yesterday I finished The Long Dark.  This is now the farthest I've ever gotten in LotR LCG!!!  After all these years, I am finally progressing into new content.  So, playing once a week has helped maintain momentum.
    However, there is another factor: I have created my first "good" deck (or rather, a pair of decks, since I play 2-handed): Dwarves!  Dain helps glue this deck together, and so far, several missions into the Khazad Dum/Dwarrowdelf quests, I haven't needed to rebuild my decks!  This also reduces the overhead of playing LotR, and gets rid of the most stressful part of the game for me, which is deck building (since I hate the process of removing cool cards from decks, and so many cards seem cool to me!).
    So, those 2 things have helped me maintain momentum for the longest period of time so far:
    1) playing once a week, and
    2) playing a "good" deck (which doesn't need to be tweaked between scenarios)
    Hopefully this update will help other people in similar situations find ways to establish their momentum too! 
    It feels great to be finally making progress in this game!
  21. Thanks
    tripecac got a reaction from icabod in What card game would help get kids ready to learn LotR LCG?   
    We played the first Harry Potter scenario.  The girls really enjoyed it.  Since it's been a while since we've played, we'll probably replay the first scenario before continuing to the second.
    I thought it was okay.  It was hard to get into it, story-wise, because I was teaching, playing, and acting as the "bank".  Hopefully our  second session will result in more immersion!
  22. Like
    tripecac got a reaction from rbaker1978 in Things that we should still be expecting from future relases   
    Things I would like to see:
    1) Campaigns which reuse existing encounter sets, but give us brand new quest cards with the aim of "linking" the individual quests into a progressive narrative.  Initially there could be one campaign per cycle, but later campaigns could jump back and forth between cycles.  This series of campaigns would be cheap to produce, and would give buys a compelling reason to collect entire cycles.  FFG could also combine each cycle's campaign and packs in a single "complete cycle" box so that new LotR LCG players don't have to collect the expansions individually (which can get frustrating and expensive due to shipping).  For example the "Complete Moria" box would contain Khazad Dum, the 6 Dwarrowdelf quest packs, all related Nightmare packs, and the new campaign for that cycle.
    2) A single Nightmare Collection for each cycle (to reduce the frustration and cost of individual collection).  Or, take it a step further and include multiple cycles' Nightmare decks in one big collection.
    3) A set of Fortune Decks which work just like Nightmare decks, but in the opposite direction.  These would consist of encounter cards which make the game easier.  For example: easy locations and enemies which give bonuses when explored/eliminated, "treacheries" which help the player, and shadow effects which make the enemies' attack LESS effective (e.g., "fumble" could cause the attack to do 0 damage).  These cards would be added, so we wouldn't be "losing" anything from the original quest like we do with Easy Mode.
    4) A book containing lots of LotR LCG related information, including tips, maps, and "official" decks for tackling each cycle (for those of us who do not love deck building).
  23. Like
    tripecac got a reaction from Wandalf the Gizzard in Things that we should still be expecting from future relases   
    Things I would like to see:
    1) Campaigns which reuse existing encounter sets, but give us brand new quest cards with the aim of "linking" the individual quests into a progressive narrative.  Initially there could be one campaign per cycle, but later campaigns could jump back and forth between cycles.  This series of campaigns would be cheap to produce, and would give buys a compelling reason to collect entire cycles.  FFG could also combine each cycle's campaign and packs in a single "complete cycle" box so that new LotR LCG players don't have to collect the expansions individually (which can get frustrating and expensive due to shipping).  For example the "Complete Moria" box would contain Khazad Dum, the 6 Dwarrowdelf quest packs, all related Nightmare packs, and the new campaign for that cycle.
    2) A single Nightmare Collection for each cycle (to reduce the frustration and cost of individual collection).  Or, take it a step further and include multiple cycles' Nightmare decks in one big collection.
    3) A set of Fortune Decks which work just like Nightmare decks, but in the opposite direction.  These would consist of encounter cards which make the game easier.  For example: easy locations and enemies which give bonuses when explored/eliminated, "treacheries" which help the player, and shadow effects which make the enemies' attack LESS effective (e.g., "fumble" could cause the attack to do 0 damage).  These cards would be added, so we wouldn't be "losing" anything from the original quest like we do with Easy Mode.
    4) A book containing lots of LotR LCG related information, including tips, maps, and "official" decks for tackling each cycle (for those of us who do not love deck building).
  24. Like
    tripecac got a reaction from Gandalf_ in Things that we should still be expecting from future relases   
    Things I would like to see:
    1) Campaigns which reuse existing encounter sets, but give us brand new quest cards with the aim of "linking" the individual quests into a progressive narrative.  Initially there could be one campaign per cycle, but later campaigns could jump back and forth between cycles.  This series of campaigns would be cheap to produce, and would give buys a compelling reason to collect entire cycles.  FFG could also combine each cycle's campaign and packs in a single "complete cycle" box so that new LotR LCG players don't have to collect the expansions individually (which can get frustrating and expensive due to shipping).  For example the "Complete Moria" box would contain Khazad Dum, the 6 Dwarrowdelf quest packs, all related Nightmare packs, and the new campaign for that cycle.
    2) A single Nightmare Collection for each cycle (to reduce the frustration and cost of individual collection).  Or, take it a step further and include multiple cycles' Nightmare decks in one big collection.
    3) A set of Fortune Decks which work just like Nightmare decks, but in the opposite direction.  These would consist of encounter cards which make the game easier.  For example: easy locations and enemies which give bonuses when explored/eliminated, "treacheries" which help the player, and shadow effects which make the enemies' attack LESS effective (e.g., "fumble" could cause the attack to do 0 damage).  These cards would be added, so we wouldn't be "losing" anything from the original quest like we do with Easy Mode.
    4) A book containing lots of LotR LCG related information, including tips, maps, and "official" decks for tackling each cycle (for those of us who do not love deck building).
  25. Like
    tripecac got a reaction from Wandalf the Gizzard in Which forum is better for FFG?   
    OMG, thanks!!!!  I've been using BGG for months and never figured out how to get those forums to sort "normally"!  I never thought to click on "Active".
    Thanks again!!!
    (Man, BGG sure needs a UI overhaul!!!)
     
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