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Eu8L1ch

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  1. LoL ok. I asked because that would explain quite a lot (people were giving credit to the Deluxe box thing as if someone who was in the know spoke about it) but that's the first time I've read about it, plus the other rumors about Mantis/Shadowlands seemed totally off to me.
  2. I think the OP is substantially correct. An important point to make is that balanced != well-designed. A card is badly designed if it provides the player with an unfun experience. While what is fun is ultimately subjective, if we play a game with so many decision points we expect those decisions to matter - so if they don't we're right to say it is unfun. However, if a card has an almost completely random effect (for example, Shrine Maiden; you can deckbuild to maximize your chances but the effect itself has a massive variance, since it could either draw 0, 1, 2 or 3 cards with each outcome being strictly better or worse than the others) or is so good that it removes agency for your opponent (Lion's Pride Brawler), then the experience is not fun. If you provide each player with that kind of effect the game can still be perfectly balanced but not a fun experience (flipping a coin a few times to see who gets more heads is a perfectly balanced game but it's usually not considered a fun one). I agree this game is brilliant and I don't think it's anywhere near full of cards ruining the playing experience, but there are definetly some. While the Shrine Maiden's is a minor effect one can live with, LPB is so powerful that even if you were to nerf it signifcantly (by making it able to affect only partecipating characters) it would still be very good - which is more or less the definition of overpowered. Let Go is another card that sticks out by being too good, since it literally has no downsides while it creates a game-changing swing in some situations (discarding a Reprieve on a beefed-up character about to leave play, destroying a R1 Spyglass on a mobile character, removing a Cloud the Mind on your Spiritcaller etc. etc.). Policy Debate is unfun by removing an important element of the game (hidden information) and removing one of your opponent's main assets for very little set up; worse still, it's a neutral card, unlike the Meek Informant which does part of the same effect but has to paid in influence for non-Scorpion decks. Shameful Display is the biggest offender for provinces, since it often creates a game-changing swing; having to explore your opponent's provinces and play around them is a fundamental aspect of the game, so, even if it is possible to bypass it (by playing Wayfinders, Pathfinder's Blades etc.), it still makes for a very dangerous card to have in the game; if we'll see more of those province-negating effects (accessible to every deck) it might become less of a problem for the game, but that is a slippery slope: province blanking should be kept in check, since ultimately province effects are a (fun) part of the game, so we would be worse off without them. Note I'm not even considering counters since that would deserve a thread on its own. Bottom line, I think this game is quite well balanced but there are also a few cards that have the potential to spoil the experience.
  3. Yes please! I'd love a YT channel featuring high-level competitive games. There are currently a few streamers on Twitch that are doing a very good job but it's never enough!
  4. That, so very much that. That's something that is not easy to grasp - since most people tend to be self-focused, which is fine but makes understanding others more difficult - but it is vital to mantain a healthy environment. People have different reasons and different goals for playing. The only thing you left out that I think is worth pointing out is that, sometimes, those goals conflict with one another and there will be choices to be made that will prioritize one over the other. However, rather than subtracting from the importance of what you said, that makes it even more important, since that's the very ground on which people need to start to even have a hope of keeping everything civil.
  5. @Khift I'm not sure I understood everything, but the way I read this whole debate could be broken down like this: Preliminary Observation: Going into the latest two rounds with a 4-2 record and a blank SoS gives you almost no chances of making the cut. => Proved mathemathically by Khift in the OP. Khift's Thesis: Blanking SoS is not the correct course of action. A correct choice would be either resetting the score for Day 2 (which is unfeasible for obvious reasons) or carrying SoS over from the first 6 rounds. Reasoning: 1) Points awarded for win/loss are dependant upon your results and the population they've been obtained into. 2) Strenght of schedule is dependant upon your results, the population and the results of the people you've played against (thus you do not have complete control over it, but that's another concern). 3) Strenght of schedule aims to reflect the fact that some players had a rougher schedule than others, thus adjusting the value of the points gained during the tournament to *hopefully* reflect each player's performance more accurately. Thus, SoS is an integral part of the score. 4) Either the scoring holds its value for the final 2 rounds or it doesn't. We are assuming it does. Conclusion: There is not a solid reason to disregard during the final 2 rounds the merit a given player has accured by having a very rough schedule for their previous games. Even worse, there is no reason to do it when it means having people playing in a competition when they know that they don't have any hope of winning - which is cruel towards them. To counter an objection which I think has been raised in a previous post: The fact that the population was different for each of the three days (and that the skill levels might have been different amongst the three) might constitute a solid basis to criticise the structure of the tournament. However, this criticism cannot be aimed solely at one of the two elements (SoS in this case) since they were both (score and SoS) obtained in the same environment, thus they are both skewed by the difference in the population or neither is.
  6. Full spoilers, really? Link please NVM, found those, they're on reddit it seems.
  7. @Barby007 I've played a lot of Phoenix with single Core (I also played Phoenix at L5R Honored) and a good deal with 3x. I think the best way to play Phoenix is like an avalanche: takes time to start moving, but when it does it's pretty hard to stop. You achieve that by trying to create a lasting board of honored characters, investing fate especially in those who are particularly powerful (like Isawa Atsuko, for example). The main issue is that being honored or not means a huge board swing for Phoenix, so you have to be very careful in order to keep momentum. It should also be noted that there are quite a few events (most notably For Shame!) that can ruin your gameplan very easily, so you should be patient and try to endure it all because, if you manage to do that, you'll most likely come out on top. The other thing I would advise (which is not general consensus among Phoenix players) is that you should be proactive: many of your cards reward you for declaring the right conflict at the right time (Adept of Waves, Isawa Atsuko, Solemn Scholar, any high glory character with Fire really), so don't be too shy. Winning conflicts is usually a pain for us due to our general lack of powerful tricks and average/under average stats but if you can win the key ones the avalanche will hopefully get going. Hope this helps! P.S.: do not attempt a honor win, there aren't enough tools in the Core Set for that to be effective. If your opponent bids carelessly then sure, go for it, but never choose it as your main strategy.
  8. Why would exactly his (InquisitorM's) position be solipsistic? Could you explain? I think you're confusing social sciences with politics. Politics, as it is used in common parlance, concerns specifically the form of government adopted by human societies; as such, it is a subset of social sciences. The usage of the term includes matters concerning specific governments (i.e. historical states and nations), so it is used properly when talking about, for example, whether or not one approves of early 20th century Japan, but it is not used properly when referencing more generic human behaviour (like saying that incest between parents and their offspring is considered a taboo in the vast majority of human societies). In this particular situation, it seems like some people are supposedly taking the Banzai! chant as an endorsment for Japan's policy. I think what Daigotsu Steve was getting at in his post, the way I understand it, is that it is clear from the context in which the chant happens - which is social but not political - that the meaning itself was also not political; therefore, it seems like any assumption towards a different interpretation is misguided at best.
  9. I used to play rugby, in which it is part of the protocol to shout - first with your own teammates, then all together with the opposing team - before/after the game. As such, I find shouting Banzai! as a "team-spirit-building" thing more than anything else. If anyone does not want to partecipate in it, because they dislike the notion of shouting out loud/don't like noise/whatever-other-personal-preference, I think that's totally fine and they should not be looked down upon in the slightest: it's a thing that is done for fun, if it's not fun for them then they surely have a solid reason not to do it. On one hand, I could accept a criticism of the Banzai! chant from an in-community in-game perspective if its meaning was offensive towards, say, the players not belonging to your clan (if its meaning was something like "hate your enemy"). However its meaning is, again, clearly positive: its goal is to celebrate the game all together and unify the community, not offending nor marginalising anyone. On the other hand, it seems to me those who criticise it on the grounds of political issues are going in the wrong direction and showing a lack of discernment: they are incapable of distinguishing the border between a game and real life. Rokugan is a fictional setting, people chanting Banzai! are doing so because it's part of the setting, not because they are supporters of the Emperor or Japanese policy or anything else that might be implied by said chant. It's true that it is a symbol, but its meaning is clearly different from its historical real-life one: the intended purpose is what matters here. People should always be mindful of the difference. To advocate its ban in a gaming context (which, just to be clear, is not what the reviewer did, as I understand it) is the equivalent of wanting to tell other people what they can and cannot have fun with, and is therefore to be considered as disrespectful of other people's autonomy. The only saving grace for those advocating the ban is that there are indeed some topics on which it is considered bad taste to joke upon, regardless of the intent. So, if one really wanted to keep advocating for the "Banzai! ban" (or its general lack of taste due to the political context), I think they'd better focus on why the Banzai! chant could be considered a sensitive topic nowadays. Being italian, it makes me think of the satire made by Charlie Hebdo's writers on the victims of the earthquake in Abruzzo one year ago. There had been a lot of debate about the opportunity of such expressions of freedom of speech in that peculiar moment and, while I will not state my position here in order to not derail the conversation, I do find it a sensible topic to discuss. However this begs the question: do those who are in the "Banzai! is offensive" camp think it is comparable to that situation? Finally, I think what @InquisitorM wrote a couple pages ago is correct: " Every individual gets to be offended at whatever they want, but being offended does not make the source offensive". It's not like those feeling insulted have always the right to forbid the others from doing/saying certain things: it's someone's right to their own sensistivity versus someone else's right to have fun with something. There is room for debate to decide which of the two is the appropriate reaction/feeling towards the issue. The statement that ethical issues boil down to personal preference rests on very flimsy propositions (I could expand on this since it falls in the field of my studies, but I'm afraid it would be well beyond the scope of this thread).
  10. Well no, I'm a vegetarian, so you can bet I ate those since the options for me were just those and the baked cheese (I dare not call it ricotta ) ones. Let's just chalk it down to a matter of culture and tastes, but for an italian/mediterranean person there are very few instances in which you can mix salty and sweet foods, and that is most certainly not one of those! You englishmen also like sweet tomatos in your sandwiches, so I know I have to resign to it while I'm in your - otherwise really nice - country!
  11. I'll add myself to the list of those who saw themselves (briefly) on video. Great coverage, the guy doing the interviews was very cool. Thanks for posting it!
  12. Just finished watching it, nice episode. Very much agreed on Kaede, I think she exemplifies perfectly the spirit of the Phoenix clan: lower stats with high glory, so she needs to be honored to win conflicts, but a very powerful ability that shapes the board. Only thing I totally disagree upon is the statement that the food at L5R Honored was fantastic as for the rest though FFG made an outstanding job, and they even very kindly gave me a replacement for one of the Fans I lost during the event so I for one cannot complain in the slightest. It was an amazing experience, it's just a pity it couldn't have been done over two days so we were in a bit of a rush all the time. Also getting to see you guys in person was quite cool! Cheers.
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