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van Riebeeck

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  1. Like
    van Riebeeck got a reaction from HeavensThunderHammer in Rogue Traders and Breeding   
    There are quite a few points to consider:
     
    - On the RP side offspring is too often neglected. It is one of the basest of human drives that player characters almost never seem to exhibit. Understandable from the gaming point of view, but if you truly go in character this question should be adressed. All living humans are confronted in one way or another with this problem and so should all characters.
     
    - Once you have this question of offspring popping up, the next question appears: What are your hopes for your offspring? Do you as a Rogue Trader wish to see them following in your path of glory and derring do?
     
    - After which we can enter into a more rational field of power and politics. What is your Warrant of Trade? What is its goal? And what are your goals? If you are a true paragon of the Imperium only interested in increasing the Rule of Man, you will look quite differently at your heirs than you would as a potentate hoping to carve out its own dominion in the lawless expanse. Same goes for the rules under which the Warrant was granted. Is it to pass through direct descendance? Can you choose amongst your descendants? Can you adopt? And who choses and confirms said heir? Endless permutations of all the above are possible.
     
    - Age, oh yes, quite rightly, age, with all the rejuvenat posibilities that might get akward. But I think that a bit of age would be wise on a Rogue Trader, certainly considering the fact that the wisdom conferred by experience is not diminished by the increasing decrepitude of old age in WH40K (at least for those with the means and up to a certain extent). 
     
    - Combining all of this I would as a Rogue Trader choose to adopt by heir from my wider offspring, a bit comparable to the adopted Emperors in Rome. This gives you a very good shot at getting the best one of the flock. But the obvious problem is infighting. Or do I see a perfect start of a RT campaign appearing....
  2. Like
    van Riebeeck reacted to SirRunOn in New Year! New Video!   
    Happy New Year!
     
    Hope people don't mind me putting this all around. Haven't been around these parts much lately, but to celebrate the new year, a new youtube video! I figure different people have different forums watched so I'm sending it everywhere.
     
    A trip through 40k. Into space and back!
     
    Now, to find some voice actors!
     
  3. Like
    van Riebeeck reacted to Angel of Death in For the Holiday   
    Guess who is coming to Town, why it is Santa Klaws and his big old armored sled
     

     
    and to quote a classic holiday song
    "But if someone's climbin' down your chimney
    You better load your gun and shoot to kill"
  4. Like
    van Riebeeck got a reaction from Mellon in The Inquisition and NOT Dying!!   
    And never forget the importance of remaining useful. An Inquisitor might - with regret if he or she is a good Imperial - feel that it is necessary to ensure that a tool that has seen too much can't corrupt the rest of the Imperium, but should hesitate if that tool is still useful or even vital. For as long as the Imperium truly needs you, you have a good chance of not being sacrificed on the pire of the Great Cause.
  5. Like
    van Riebeeck got a reaction from Magnus Grendel in The Inquisition and NOT Dying!!   
    And never forget the importance of remaining useful. An Inquisitor might - with regret if he or she is a good Imperial - feel that it is necessary to ensure that a tool that has seen too much can't corrupt the rest of the Imperium, but should hesitate if that tool is still useful or even vital. For as long as the Imperium truly needs you, you have a good chance of not being sacrificed on the pire of the Great Cause.
  6. Like
    van Riebeeck got a reaction from Magnus Grendel in need help with a character   
    Don't forget the Painboy. No good crew is complete without a good MadDoc.
  7. Like
    van Riebeeck got a reaction from Radwraith in need help with a character   
    Or an all Ork crew. Not sure how long such a campaign would last, but I am sure it would ensure some hilarious moments. 
  8. Like
    van Riebeeck reacted to Magnus Grendel in need help with a character   
    We're actually planning to do this soon. Waaaggh! Trada is hilarious. Especially when playing proper freebootaz and occasionally signing on to 'help' Imperial forces.
     
    The nice thing about Orks is that you can make a full 'capable' krew - Mekboy as explorator, Evil Sunz Driva as helmsman, Goff commander, Wierdboy as combined astropath/navigator, etc, etc, and the raiders and kroozas are 'multipart' ships that you can produce a unique one for them to command.
  9. Like
    van Riebeeck got a reaction from Magnus Grendel in need help with a character   
    Or an all Ork crew. Not sure how long such a campaign would last, but I am sure it would ensure some hilarious moments. 
  10. Like
    van Riebeeck got a reaction from Keeper151 in need help with a character   
    Or an all Ork crew. Not sure how long such a campaign would last, but I am sure it would ensure some hilarious moments. 
  11. Like
    van Riebeeck got a reaction from Erathia in need help with a character   
    Just say no. If he is a good player (both IC and OOC) he will understand and come up with another cool and interesting concept. Playing a Xenos character in an Imperial game is never a right, but at most a request one can make at the GM and the other players, as it has the potential to cause massive disruption in the campaign and within the group dynamics.
  12. Like
    van Riebeeck got a reaction from Erathia in Something special for the Captain   
    I wonder if knowing about Rubric Marines isn't enough to attract a load of unwanted attention...
  13. Like
    van Riebeeck got a reaction from AxeSpanna in Something special for the Captain   
    I wonder if knowing about Rubric Marines isn't enough to attract a load of unwanted attention...
  14. Like
    van Riebeeck got a reaction from Firebeard in need help with a character   
    Just say no. If he is a good player (both IC and OOC) he will understand and come up with another cool and interesting concept. Playing a Xenos character in an Imperial game is never a right, but at most a request one can make at the GM and the other players, as it has the potential to cause massive disruption in the campaign and within the group dynamics.
  15. Like
    van Riebeeck got a reaction from Keeper151 in Shooting a gun is not directing a macrobattery   
    I suppose most of you will recognise this: Space combat is well and truly initiated. The ship is in range and the command bridge hums with activity. Cogitator units wirr going through all the transmutations of targetting a hostile ship more than 15 void units away. Skilled crewmen make their calculations, aided by servitors that crunch out the final firing directions. Overseeing this all is the captain of the ship, making sure his team of specialists works as one to fire the massive macrobatteries and awesome lances.....and then up steps the gunslinging bodyguard of the captain. This guy is a great shot. Born in the dangers of an underhive he learned to shoot before he could walk. He can shoot a lho stick out of a mouth at a thousand meters range. He can draw his pistols faster than his shadow. He is bolter and plasma fury personified. And now he uses these instinctive skills and his 81 ballistic skill to hip-shoot with the ships weapons. 
     
    This doesn't fit. Of course, RP rules are just fantasy rules, but they should try to emulate (the admittedly fantastic) reality as well as possible and in is clear that in the above example this is not the case. Nothing has prepared this individualistic gunslinger with little or no education and technical skills in directing the complex targetting of shipborne weapons, but this is what is done according to the rules. Furthermore, the quality of the crew hardly plays a role in this. Wether this gunslinger stands on the bridge of the flagship of Battlefleet Calixis and directs the guns of the awesomely experienced crew (60) of the pride of the Imperial Navy or wether he has just joined the rag tag mob manning a miserable trader and its neophyte crew (20) doesn't matter a jot. The ship uses this 81 BS, with all the other modifiers added. 
     
    Now, before I continue, let me make it clear that it is obvious that characters have to play a real role in ship combat. This is not a battlefleet simulation, but a roleplaying game and character actions matter. But using the BS of a character to direct a ships gun - with no training required, making it easier to use than a lasgun - is in my eyes an oversimplification that is unrealistic (see above) and destabilising, as it makes player character vessels insanely more dangerous than NPC crewed ships.
     
    To resolve this, I am pondering about the following:
     
    - We might average out the ballistic skill of the player directing the weapons with the crew skill. This is easily and quickly done and gives the players a direct influence on the capabilities of their ship while making crew quality of vital importance. In the above example the Navy battleship would see its allready awesome skill of 60 boosted to a near mythical 71 (rounding up), a terrifying number. While the rag tag tader would see a very hefty boost from 20 to 51. An enormous difference, but at least the green boys and old men have not reached a near perfect level of firing due to the presence of one man. 
     
    - We might add a number of skills to be taken. Shipboard weapon training (macrobattery), Shipboard weapon training (lances), Shipboard weapon training (torpedoes) and Shipboard weapon training (Nova Cannon) seem logical, with a 300/300/300/500 XP cost (or something in those lines). Logical careers for those skills would be those of the Rogue Trader, Void Master, Explorator and Arch Militant (all the careers with the void tactician talent).
     
    - A more far going step would be to use the crew skill, and allow the character directing the guns to modify this according to a specific skill. This would uncouple a ships firepower from the BS of a character, but still allow a player to have vast influence on the firepower of a ship. Master Gunner, Master Gunner +10, Master Gunner +20 and Master Gunner (talented) could work quite well and still place a premium on the quality of the crew. In the above example, this might even allow the battleship to reach a skill of 90 (which seems a good reward for any rogue trader party that has worked so hard to get an exceptional crew) while the green trader is steadied by the experienced hand on the bridge to a very respectable skill of 50.
     
    This would mean that the bodyguard of the captain would no longer be a mere gunslinger. Dedication to the complex weaponry of his ship has made him a highly skilled and vital crewmember. He seamlessly slides in the often rehearsed positions, directs the bridge crew while trusting that the endless training in the gundecks will now pay off. 
  16. Like
    van Riebeeck reacted to Magnus Grendel in The First Rogue Traders?   
    Very much so. Imperial Commanders being virtual Feudal Fiefdoms, Inquisitors, and so on, is a logical response to the fact that you cannot administer the Imperium as a co-ordinated entity.
     
    Astropathic Communication (outside of archaeotech and truly exceptional individuals) is unreliable and largely unable to convey details beyond "Oh Bugger, Orks!".
     
    Travel by ship can take weeks to get somewhere and similar weeks to get back, meaning that any decision which needs to be done in, say, a month (which, barring major policy & budget decisions, is most of them), has to be delegated to authorities within a star system.
  17. Like
    van Riebeeck reacted to Errant Knight in The First Rogue Traders?   
    A privateer's letter of marque is one way to view of Warrant of Trade.  That would probably account for many of the warrants in existence.  I think most of our games, though, permit the RT (if someone is playing that career) to purchase Warrant of Renown.  This probably indicates something more than a letter of marque.  It's probably more akin to one of the royal joint stock charters granted to the various Indies companies or the Virginia Company.  My 2 cents.
  18. Like
    van Riebeeck got a reaction from Magnus Grendel in The First Rogue Traders?   
    If we take an historical tack to the discussion, we might compare the Imperial Warrants of Trade with Privateers of old: a private person entitled to wage war on behalf of his nation. It was a perfect way for a state to quickly and cheaply (at least for the treasury) raise large amounts of ship that were eminently suited for raiding hostile trade, which could seriously squeeze an opponents economy. Privateers would not win battles or take cities, but the continuing attrition they inflicted was very effective indeed.
    When we translate this to the Imperium of Man, there is a logic to it. This massive conglomeration of worlds isn't an easily centralized unity of which all resources can be used to maximum efficiency by a central government. Even within a sector or subsector this is unthinkable. Mobilization for war within the Imperium is massive - for the Imperium is massive - but ponderous and inefficient. The sheer distances, sketchy communications and decentralization of power make this unavoidable.
    Within this context, it again becomes useful to employ such privateers: mighty indivuals with their own powerbase and wealth, all of which can be harnessed relatively quickly and easily by the Imperium without it impacting to much on the Imperial Navy, Imperial Guard and Adptus Astartes. If their missions are especially important, they might get supported but the Imperial outlay needed  - as opposed to that of the Rogue Trader - is a fraction of what would be needed for a real campaign or crusade. 
    Would this be an effective way for a centralized state to use the resources at its disposal? No, most defintely not. There is a good reason privateers last showed up in the 19th century and disappeared once states became so efficient that they could harness all the resources at their disposal in case of war. But would this be effective for the Imperium? Yes, most certainly, even for the Emperor himself. His conquests were not just wars for he was the first to try and win over human world by diplomacy and politics. His early Imperium was not a unified, centralized state (hence the Emperor turning to the webway) that could use all the means of the newly incorporated planets at will. So what better way to use all this unused potential power than by creating Warrants of Trade?
  19. Like
    van Riebeeck got a reaction from Radwraith in The First Rogue Traders?   
    If we take an historical tack to the discussion, we might compare the Imperial Warrants of Trade with Privateers of old: a private person entitled to wage war on behalf of his nation. It was a perfect way for a state to quickly and cheaply (at least for the treasury) raise large amounts of ship that were eminently suited for raiding hostile trade, which could seriously squeeze an opponents economy. Privateers would not win battles or take cities, but the continuing attrition they inflicted was very effective indeed.
    When we translate this to the Imperium of Man, there is a logic to it. This massive conglomeration of worlds isn't an easily centralized unity of which all resources can be used to maximum efficiency by a central government. Even within a sector or subsector this is unthinkable. Mobilization for war within the Imperium is massive - for the Imperium is massive - but ponderous and inefficient. The sheer distances, sketchy communications and decentralization of power make this unavoidable.
    Within this context, it again becomes useful to employ such privateers: mighty indivuals with their own powerbase and wealth, all of which can be harnessed relatively quickly and easily by the Imperium without it impacting to much on the Imperial Navy, Imperial Guard and Adptus Astartes. If their missions are especially important, they might get supported but the Imperial outlay needed  - as opposed to that of the Rogue Trader - is a fraction of what would be needed for a real campaign or crusade. 
    Would this be an effective way for a centralized state to use the resources at its disposal? No, most defintely not. There is a good reason privateers last showed up in the 19th century and disappeared once states became so efficient that they could harness all the resources at their disposal in case of war. But would this be effective for the Imperium? Yes, most certainly, even for the Emperor himself. His conquests were not just wars for he was the first to try and win over human world by diplomacy and politics. His early Imperium was not a unified, centralized state (hence the Emperor turning to the webway) that could use all the means of the newly incorporated planets at will. So what better way to use all this unused potential power than by creating Warrants of Trade?
  20. Like
    van Riebeeck got a reaction from AxeSpanna in The First Rogue Traders?   
    If we take an historical tack to the discussion, we might compare the Imperial Warrants of Trade with Privateers of old: a private person entitled to wage war on behalf of his nation. It was a perfect way for a state to quickly and cheaply (at least for the treasury) raise large amounts of ship that were eminently suited for raiding hostile trade, which could seriously squeeze an opponents economy. Privateers would not win battles or take cities, but the continuing attrition they inflicted was very effective indeed.
    When we translate this to the Imperium of Man, there is a logic to it. This massive conglomeration of worlds isn't an easily centralized unity of which all resources can be used to maximum efficiency by a central government. Even within a sector or subsector this is unthinkable. Mobilization for war within the Imperium is massive - for the Imperium is massive - but ponderous and inefficient. The sheer distances, sketchy communications and decentralization of power make this unavoidable.
    Within this context, it again becomes useful to employ such privateers: mighty indivuals with their own powerbase and wealth, all of which can be harnessed relatively quickly and easily by the Imperium without it impacting to much on the Imperial Navy, Imperial Guard and Adptus Astartes. If their missions are especially important, they might get supported but the Imperial outlay needed  - as opposed to that of the Rogue Trader - is a fraction of what would be needed for a real campaign or crusade. 
    Would this be an effective way for a centralized state to use the resources at its disposal? No, most defintely not. There is a good reason privateers last showed up in the 19th century and disappeared once states became so efficient that they could harness all the resources at their disposal in case of war. But would this be effective for the Imperium? Yes, most certainly, even for the Emperor himself. His conquests were not just wars for he was the first to try and win over human world by diplomacy and politics. His early Imperium was not a unified, centralized state (hence the Emperor turning to the webway) that could use all the means of the newly incorporated planets at will. So what better way to use all this unused potential power than by creating Warrants of Trade?
  21. Like
    van Riebeeck got a reaction from SCKoNi in The First Rogue Traders?   
    If we take an historical tack to the discussion, we might compare the Imperial Warrants of Trade with Privateers of old: a private person entitled to wage war on behalf of his nation. It was a perfect way for a state to quickly and cheaply (at least for the treasury) raise large amounts of ship that were eminently suited for raiding hostile trade, which could seriously squeeze an opponents economy. Privateers would not win battles or take cities, but the continuing attrition they inflicted was very effective indeed.
    When we translate this to the Imperium of Man, there is a logic to it. This massive conglomeration of worlds isn't an easily centralized unity of which all resources can be used to maximum efficiency by a central government. Even within a sector or subsector this is unthinkable. Mobilization for war within the Imperium is massive - for the Imperium is massive - but ponderous and inefficient. The sheer distances, sketchy communications and decentralization of power make this unavoidable.
    Within this context, it again becomes useful to employ such privateers: mighty indivuals with their own powerbase and wealth, all of which can be harnessed relatively quickly and easily by the Imperium without it impacting to much on the Imperial Navy, Imperial Guard and Adptus Astartes. If their missions are especially important, they might get supported but the Imperial outlay needed  - as opposed to that of the Rogue Trader - is a fraction of what would be needed for a real campaign or crusade. 
    Would this be an effective way for a centralized state to use the resources at its disposal? No, most defintely not. There is a good reason privateers last showed up in the 19th century and disappeared once states became so efficient that they could harness all the resources at their disposal in case of war. But would this be effective for the Imperium? Yes, most certainly, even for the Emperor himself. His conquests were not just wars for he was the first to try and win over human world by diplomacy and politics. His early Imperium was not a unified, centralized state (hence the Emperor turning to the webway) that could use all the means of the newly incorporated planets at will. So what better way to use all this unused potential power than by creating Warrants of Trade?
  22. Like
    van Riebeeck got a reaction from Coidzor in Employing Space Marines   
    My first question would be: Why would my IG like to invade immediately? Is the general in command a secret agent of the Tau or worse? Attacking a planet while there still is an enemy fleet in system is the height of folly. Only if time is of supreme essence should such an action even be considered. First, secure that system superiority by destroying or driving off that Tau fleet, where you should be able to make great use of those Space Marines. 
     
    Once the first phase, system supremacy, has been accomplished, you can start the next phase: planetary defense suppression. First off all aimed at destroying the planetary defenses capable of dealing damage to your ships: torpedo launchers, planetary lance batteries, air bases and the like. Again a phase where the supreme orbital attack capability of Space Marines will come into play. Once you can keep your ships in relative safety in orbit, you can proceed by attacking any hostile concentrations and infrastructure. If at all possible (and wished for, considering the destruction you might wreak upon the planet), you can should maintain this as long as needed.
     
    Only then will the IG carry out its invasion, aiming for a good planetary airhead first in which it can bring its vulnerable heavy lifters and the crucial follow on forces. Space Marines could be used here to knock out vital left over defenses or kept as a reserve to swing the tide of battle if need be. 
     
    Finally, our IG can proceed with its full conquest of the planet. Again Space Marines could be used, heading vital assaults or executing special operations. But only if need be. Normally, the battle should be won by now, even if the fighting might still last a long time. 
     
    Your Space Marines are a precious lancet that you can use to execute limited very high value operations. Sometimes, these might be shortcuts to victory (as in the above example), but this likely is the exception. In all cases, their use should be offensive (or in a counterattack). If you ever order them to hold ground at all cost, you better make sure this is very important ground indeed or you can kiss your stripes goodbye and put on that explosive collar of a shtrafbat.
  23. Like
    van Riebeeck got a reaction from SCKoNi in Dying in the Expanse?   
    Or a plain old fashioned heart failure, massive radiation dose due to a space suit mishap or slipping in the shower. Anything that might kill a outwardly healthy man in his 40-ties or 50-ties in our universe could affect a patriarch, even with rejuvenation treatments.
  24. Like
    van Riebeeck got a reaction from Magnus Grendel in Archeotech traders   
    Is there such a thing as a regular trade in archeotech? Or what form would it take?
     
    In my view, any archeotech trade will be very limited at best. Why? Well, first and foremost, the Adeptus Mechanicus considers these items to be Holy. It will not just trade them away for throne gelt: if the Adeptus Mechanicus grants an individual the great honour of possessing one of the great works of hallowed antiquity, it must have a good reason for doing so, such as great services rendered. Furthermore, there is the Treaty of Mars: one could read this as giving the Adeptus Mechanicus a claim on any piece of Archeotech recovered by the Imperium. Now they won't be able to go that far (even if there are undoubtedly factions in the Mechanicus willing to go that far and further) and a lot depends on who recovers what when and where. A poor sinkhole miner who chances on an archeotech cache with a magnificent powersword has obviously a worse chance of keeping his grubby hands on it than a Rogue Trader does, but even said Rogue Trader might find the Mechanicus becoming 'insistent' if his find is truly of momentous importance. So it seems to me that the Adeptus Mechanicus won't sell (as opposed to grant) Archeotech and will do its utmost to recover any Archeotech that is on an 'open market', by any means if need be.
    To this we should add that the parties that do posses Archeotech will be loathe to part with it. Whatever is in the hands of the Imperial Navy, Imperial Guard, Adeptus Astartes or any other grand Imperial organization is likely to stay there. Again, for services rendered or in pursuit of a grand goal they might grant what they have to another party, but never for throne gelt. The same goes for the Imperial Great Houses: what Rogue Trader family, Navigator House or Planetary Governor will sell of these amazingly handy and highly prestigious items? I can only imagine a situation of serious penury that would force them to do so, and then, they would probably do so in silence (which not only limits the shame of having fallen so low, but also limits the chance that the Adeptus Mechanicus starts meddling). 
     
    So we are left with an archeotech trade that depends on either the Great and Powerful becoming bankrupt and selling of some of their most precious items and the odd chance that a powerful individual like a Rogue Trader finds an item of archeotech that doesn't interest him and decides to sell it off (ask yourself how often players sell of their archeotech items), all of it overshadowed by an Adeptus Mechanicus trying to get hold of it. This is not a lot, which might make it a very profitable business for the few brokers who know who might be interested and able to pay if any item comes on the market. But while it is not illegal per se according to Imperial law (although the Mechanicus might beg to differ) and not even remotely comparable to something as terrible as the Cold Trade, it feels a bit shady and in each case, highly specialised. It demands a vast web of sector spinning contacts, a fair deal of protection and great personal skill. 
     
    is my interpretation correct? Or am I going too far in making archeotech hard to buy?
  25. Like
    van Riebeeck got a reaction from Erathia in Archeotech traders   
    Is there such a thing as a regular trade in archeotech? Or what form would it take?
     
    In my view, any archeotech trade will be very limited at best. Why? Well, first and foremost, the Adeptus Mechanicus considers these items to be Holy. It will not just trade them away for throne gelt: if the Adeptus Mechanicus grants an individual the great honour of possessing one of the great works of hallowed antiquity, it must have a good reason for doing so, such as great services rendered. Furthermore, there is the Treaty of Mars: one could read this as giving the Adeptus Mechanicus a claim on any piece of Archeotech recovered by the Imperium. Now they won't be able to go that far (even if there are undoubtedly factions in the Mechanicus willing to go that far and further) and a lot depends on who recovers what when and where. A poor sinkhole miner who chances on an archeotech cache with a magnificent powersword has obviously a worse chance of keeping his grubby hands on it than a Rogue Trader does, but even said Rogue Trader might find the Mechanicus becoming 'insistent' if his find is truly of momentous importance. So it seems to me that the Adeptus Mechanicus won't sell (as opposed to grant) Archeotech and will do its utmost to recover any Archeotech that is on an 'open market', by any means if need be.
    To this we should add that the parties that do posses Archeotech will be loathe to part with it. Whatever is in the hands of the Imperial Navy, Imperial Guard, Adeptus Astartes or any other grand Imperial organization is likely to stay there. Again, for services rendered or in pursuit of a grand goal they might grant what they have to another party, but never for throne gelt. The same goes for the Imperial Great Houses: what Rogue Trader family, Navigator House or Planetary Governor will sell of these amazingly handy and highly prestigious items? I can only imagine a situation of serious penury that would force them to do so, and then, they would probably do so in silence (which not only limits the shame of having fallen so low, but also limits the chance that the Adeptus Mechanicus starts meddling). 
     
    So we are left with an archeotech trade that depends on either the Great and Powerful becoming bankrupt and selling of some of their most precious items and the odd chance that a powerful individual like a Rogue Trader finds an item of archeotech that doesn't interest him and decides to sell it off (ask yourself how often players sell of their archeotech items), all of it overshadowed by an Adeptus Mechanicus trying to get hold of it. This is not a lot, which might make it a very profitable business for the few brokers who know who might be interested and able to pay if any item comes on the market. But while it is not illegal per se according to Imperial law (although the Mechanicus might beg to differ) and not even remotely comparable to something as terrible as the Cold Trade, it feels a bit shady and in each case, highly specialised. It demands a vast web of sector spinning contacts, a fair deal of protection and great personal skill. 
     
    is my interpretation correct? Or am I going too far in making archeotech hard to buy?
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