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richsabre

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  1. Haha
    richsabre got a reaction from Boromore in Lotr LCG Book ?   
    if they brought out some oven gloves i would probably buy them if they had this game on them haha
    i actually asked about an art book last year but it was just speculation
    i like your idea though, as long has it has lots of nice piccys in
    rich
  2. Like
    richsabre got a reaction from jormungandr in Dunhere and Unexpected Courage (or: multiple attacks from 1 character on 1 enemy)   
    that is actually the clearest anyone has ever put that rule….nice one!
    rich
  3. Like
    richsabre got a reaction from Olorin93 in Tolkien Lore Q & A   
    ok, here is a major one for you all
     
    ...Rhun....
     
    yes, that is all ..
     
    no, i mean, what was there? who lived there? who controlled there? what do we know of it? and why did aragorn visit there but gandalf never did?
  4. Like
    richsabre reacted to gandalfDK in Tolkien Lore Q & A   
    Yes, shipwreck, I was indeed asking if Thranduil sailed to the West. I was wondering, because after the Hobbit, he doesn't really get any attention. (It may be in the UT, but I have yet to read that (very quickly!)) Also I was wondering because I hoped he didn't so that there would be some Elves left in ME and his kingdom wouldn't be left to rot in Angband too, because Thranduil did not posses a Ring of Power, which would mean his realm wasn't dependend on its powe, so therefore non in it would then suddenly 'fall'.
     
    As for Elrond becoming High King, I don't think he would have wanted such a title for himself. I see Elrond more in the way of a  puppiteer (hope it is translated well), the one in the back pulling some ropes. Ropes in the form of guided advice. And what I meant with my earlier post, the High King of the Noldor wouldn't rule over Lorien or Mirkwood, so why should he even take such a title? All other Elves west of the Misty Mountains are already under his control.
     
    Rich, I was about to post a similair question. 
     
    But I know some things about Rhûn. It has never been visited by Gandalf indeed and Aragorn once, but also Saruman and the two Blue Wizards travelled there. As we know, the Blue Wizards (Alatar and Pallando) stayed. My guess is that Gandalf just didn't have any business there and rather trusted Alatar and Pallando to solve matters there. Aragorn has probably travelled there to learn his 'enemy'. What are their principals and manners of living? He had to become a wise ruler and strength in war is found in knowing your enemy (scrying ), and also learning to respect other people for the choices they (have to/forced to) make. 
     
    Rhûn is supposedly somewhat like Mongolia, but we actually don't know. There is a Sea in the middle of Rhûn, the Sea of Rhûn, so probably the climate around that area wasn't so bad. They have fought against Gondor mostly on horses (Wainraider) what also shows a connection to Atilla the Hun from Mongolia and rather not as the film depictes as mostly spearman. 
     
    Rhûn is inhabitated by Dwarfs, Men and Elves. All live originates from Rhûn; In the far east of Rhûn is where the first Elves and Men woke up. Two groups of 'lost' Elves remained there, the ones we call Dark Elves and they resisted or rather ignored the Call (see above in other post for explanation). Also in the mountains that lie in the far east, 4 of the 7 Dwarf clans live there. That almost everything we know about those Dwarves. But the main group of inhabitants are Men, also know as Easterlings.  
     
    It is suggested to be ruled by several kings, who were head of a tribe, so no unification, only if one king could rise up and claim command. Somewhat like in old Mongolia. The Easterlings have fought many wars with the West, under the service of Sauron and under themselfs. During the Wainraider invasion, they were united under 1 banner by a strong leader and so could assemble a force to almost conquer Gondor. (Eorl saved them luckily) In the Thirth Age, many of the several tribeleaders swore oaths to Sauron and their main army attacked Erebor and Dale In the Fourth Age Aragorn and his son subdued them in their wars against them, and probably made peace after several victories, when they had shown the new strenght of Gondor and Rohan.
     
    We know not much about them. Not even what language they spoke.. 
     
    "That moment when you wished your favorite author only died after he finished his work" 
  5. Like
    richsabre reacted to shoreless in Tolkien Lore Q & A   
    I'm not sure I'm clear on the question. Are you asking if Thranduil sailed West? That remains unclear. The Call, if you will, remained/remains open to all of the Eldar for as long as the world lasts. Some (mostly those dark elves that did not heed the original call of the Valar, but also some Silvan/Noldor) refused the call even through physical death.
     
    This whole issue came up with the heated Shadow of Mordor discussions and I was directed to a passage in the Histories in which Tolkien describes the Elves in spirit form and how they could resist the Call of Mandos, lusting to remain in Middle-earth. These often fell under the 'counter-summons' of Morgoth and later Sauron and their spirits were used for evil. 
     
    All that's to say that, even though the Elves were bound to Middle-earth, each could make a choice to return to the Blessed Realm. I have no idea if Thranduil did or not, but any Elves that remained 'devolved' into the faerie spirits that became the subject of much of our own folklore
     
    And, yes, it is very sad when the Elves go. 
  6. Like
    richsabre reacted to Raven1015 in Tolkien Lore Q & A   
    This is my own headcanon as to why The Hobbit is written so differently from The Lord of the Rings and for some of the discrepancies (why the Elves act so differently, the appearance of giants, etc.), all these differences reflect Bilbo's style as a storyteller and some of his poetic license.
  7. Like
    richsabre reacted to shoreless in Tolkien Lore Q & A   
    Holy cuss, I had a long and brilliant response typed up when a link got accidentally clicked. 
     
    In short: could Giants have been ('internally', that is in the context of the story within the fictional narrative) an invention of Bilbo wanting to spice up his memoirs?
     
    And, Elrond could easily have claimed kingship over the remaining High Elves had he wanted to, even if his heritage was not as closely linked to the original Nolodorin lords of the First Age, simply because (1) he was so wise and revered and (2) his father was Eärendil.
     
    If I get bold enough I'll post again with a fuller explanation
  8. Like
    richsabre reacted to PsychoRocka in Tolkien Lore Q & A   
    @RichSabre
    I always thought of the Giants as a more primal or beast like species that fall in with all the various animals in middle earth. They may not necessarily have a fëa (soul) or at least not one that goes anywhere and simply dies with their hröa. Therefore they aren't all that important in the grand scheme of things and are just another creature, albiet a very humanoid one and probably one far cleverer than simple animals and most probably with sentience of some sort. Perhaps they are some sort of original experiment or project by Eru before he created his children, maybe he was just experimenting with appearance, size and nature and made the Giants but without fëa. He may have then left them in this primal state and decided that elves and men should be far smaller in stature but of a similar form. As far as Sauron using them perhaps they were too high in the mountains and too volatile for it to be worthwhile. I'm sure he could have brought them under his control if he tried hard enough/used enough forces to do so but the Giants may have taken out many orcs in the process so it might have just not been worth it especially when he already had armored Olog-Hai. Just my two cents
     
    As far as the origin of the Orcs I'm not sure why their longevity was one of Tolkiens main concerns if they were indeed created from Tortured/Corrupted Elves as the loss of immortality could easily be explained as a side effect of being so cruelly and fully misshapen and tortured. Morgoth was able to infuse middle earth ITSELF and its various elements (gold, silver, water etc etc etc) with his own essence meaning that every being and place had the potential for corruption or greed. He is almost like corruption incarnate really so I can see him infusing the tortured and twisted elves with parts of his own being and essence which would surely effect and remove their gift of immortality and seems to have also been so full on that they were considered from that point on a different species. 
    Merely disfiguring and torturing the elves into looking like the orcs do and breaking them mentally would not result in their offspring being the same either so obviously Morgoths essense or will being infused into them must have been what twisted them into a new race. So he hasn't created life but has rather corrupted an existing group of beings into a new type of being.
  9. Like
    richsabre reacted to TwiceBorn in Tolkien Lore Q & A   
    On a totally unrelated subject… Rich, I just checked the portfolio in your signature links… Beautiful and inspiring work!!! I've been thinking a lot these days about pursuing photography more seriously, and your pics are a real inspiration.
     
    Sorry for the thread derailment, everyone… back to our regular program! 
  10. Like
    richsabre reacted to TwiceBorn in Tolkien Lore Q & A   
    Richsabre is correct. I recently received a copy of the atlas, and it also says that Gandalf calculated it was at least "forty miles from the West-door to the East-gate in a direct line." The shallow valley in which the West-door was located was about three eights of a mile between the falls (Stair Falls) and the gate, and possibly two miles from end to end. The guardroom is shown to be around 3900 feet deep, and Fonstad judges that the "mines could have been as deep as 12,500 feet and still have been within the limits reached in our Primary World."  
     
    The maps and text in the atlas explicitly reference various Tolkien sources. I highly recommend getting a copy of the atlas, it's a wonderful addition that enhances my reading enjoyment of all of Tolkiens's writings on Middle-Earth: http://tolkiengateway.net/wiki/The_Atlas_of_Middle-earth. 
     
    As a point of reference, the Misty Mountains (including the Mountains of Angmar) are 702 miles in length.  
     
    GandalfDK, I also find this compilation to be a handy reference work (though not necessarily 100% complete/correct, but close) if you're looking for quick answers on some subjects without flipping through your various Tolkien primary sources: http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1120372.The_Complete_Tolkien_Companion. 
  11. Like
    richsabre reacted to Olorin93 in Tolkien Lore Q & A   
    Great topic idea, Rich! I love Tolkien's lore.
     
    Can I point out that orcs descending from corrupted elves is an idea Tolkien eventually scrapped? He never quite seemed to settle on the origins of orcs, but decided they were their own race and reproduced as other mortal races did, and that they were not of elvish origin. 
     
    I've been thinking about the lineage of the Noldor in the Third Age. Does anyone know whether Elrond could've claimed the title of High King of the Noldor after the fall of Gil-Galad? I'm just rereading the FotR and trying to get through the Council of Elrond, where Boromir (?) says something like the power of the lord of Imladris lies not in arms but in wise counsel. He obviously does not savour battle, but he seems to have been Gil-Galad's second-in-command in The Last Alliance. Maybe he didn't want to become king, but could he have made a case for himself if he wanted to unite the elves of Middle-Earth under one banner?
  12. Like
    richsabre got a reaction from danpoage in Beorning versus Skinchanger   
    good spot Estel Edain ... if i remember rightly, in the war of the ring the beornings had their own major battle (at the carrock? or am i thinking of something else?) ..anyways, it would have been cool to think they were skin changers... imagine the goblins coming down the mountains and being faced with an army of bears? would have loved to have seen that
  13. Like
    richsabre got a reaction from gandalfDK in Tolkien Lore Q & A   
    gandalf says, and i believe im right in remembering, it is a 40 mile trek as the crow flies through moria...so thats is its width across the mountains... there is a detailed atlas by Fonstad which gives very indepth info on these things though unfortunatly i dont have a copy...
    though i can imagine that given all the intertwining tunnels, various levels, habitable and mining areas.... it could stretch at least twice as far as that in north/south length, though im just guessing here
  14. Like
    richsabre reacted to gandalfDK in Tolkien Lore Q & A   
    As I waited for the Gandalf debate late replies, which I judge have now had the ttime to come, I would like to ask some other questions.
    I was just reading the Apendices A- About the Dwarves and I always wonder about a couple of things:
    1. Will the Dwarves go extinct in Middle-Earth in the Fourth Age?
    2. Is there more writing about Gimli setting sail to the Undying Lands then that last note?
    3. What was Dol Goldur before Sauron took refuge there?
    4. What... Okay let's stick with the Dwarves-theme, how much did Moria occupy/take in area of the Misty Mountains?
    5. Are there any tales about how Dwarves get children?
  15. Like
    richsabre reacted to Bullroarer Took in The Treason of Saruman   
    The Shadowfax teaser is pretty funny.
    "...............alf"
  16. Like
    richsabre got a reaction from Olorin93 in Tolkien Lore Q & A   
    Thought this would be a cool thread idea... Tolkien lore question and answer ... this isnt me answering lore questions (my knowledge or arrogance doesnt run so deep ) but for the whole forum... if you wonder something on LOTR or related material, ask, and the forum shall answer (hopefully )
     
    Giants... what exactly were they? i mean, we have trolls which are corruptions of ents, orcs are corruption of elves, wargs i assume (?) are corruptions of wolves...  but giants are only mentioned once and in the hobbit..and as far as i know tolkien never returns to them, or their alliegance in LOTR..we only know they at least help him periodically block up goblin cave entrances
     
    so perhaps, if they arent of 'evil' then they are creatures in their own right... but i dont remember a reference to them in the creation of creatures in silmarillion.
     
    any ideas?
    Richard
  17. Like
    richsabre reacted to TwiceBorn in Tolkien Lore Q & A   
    GandalfDK, when you finally get your hands on Unfinished Tales, you're going to love it, if only for the chapter called The Quest of Erebor, in which Gandalf explains to the members of the Fellowship of the Ring after the War of the Ring how and why he came to push Thorin to take Bilbo on his expedition to reclaim the Lonely Mountain. Unfinished Tales contains excerpts from different drafts of the story. 
     
    Gandalf admits to having some sort of "foresight," that he "feels it deep in his heart," that the quest will only succeed if Thorin takes Bilbo along… and this is based on Gandalf remembering having met Bilbo when he was a child, and on rumours he had heard about him while travelling through the Shire (at a time when Bilbo was away, "off again"), which made him sound promising to Gandalf. So he had not seen "adult Bilbo" yet when he insisted that Thorin take Bilbo with him (the Dwarves should take a Hobbit along, he argued, for Smaug would not recognize the scent of a Hobbit, whereas he would that of a Dwarf or other known enemies… and Gandalf supported the Dwarves' quest to reclaim Erebor and slay Smaug, for he feared that Sauron could make an ally of the dragon).
     
     
    In another draft, Gandalf answers questions about why he chose Bilbo for the quest to Erebor:
     
     
    So in the above excerpt, we see that Gandalf is a psychologist relying heavily on intuition, rather than definite foresight  … as confirmed by the following excerpt:
     
     
    With regards to the "mistake" that "nearly proved disastrous," Gandalf says:
     
     
    Another relevant excerpt/explanation from Gandalf with regards to foresight/fate:
     
     
    In the essay on The Istari in Unfinished Tales, J.R.R. Tolkien writes:
     
     
    Christopher Tolkien remarks in the essay on The Istari:
     
     
    All of the above suggests to me that as a result of his ancient roots and connection with one of the Valar, Gandalf might have some insights into possible/likely futures. His limited ability to foretell future events also would have been a combination of intuition and deduction derived over a millennia of observing mortal/Elvish behaviour in Middle Earth (though as indicated in the second last spoiler, as an Istar, he had to "learn much anew by slow experience"). Aside from that, Gandalf does seem to believe in Fate (the inevitable outcome of the music of the Valar that created the world in the Silmarillion?) or discrete divine intervention leading things in a certain direction, though that fate can be altered through the (unanticipated) actions of mortals and immortals alike ('for even the very wise cannot see all ends').  
     
    All this of course being a long-winded answer that essentially supports what Estel Edain and Gandalf DK have already suggested in prior posts… 
  18. Like
    richsabre got a reaction from OnkelZorni in Tolkien Lore Q & A   
    Thought this would be a cool thread idea... Tolkien lore question and answer ... this isnt me answering lore questions (my knowledge or arrogance doesnt run so deep ) but for the whole forum... if you wonder something on LOTR or related material, ask, and the forum shall answer (hopefully )
     
    Giants... what exactly were they? i mean, we have trolls which are corruptions of ents, orcs are corruption of elves, wargs i assume (?) are corruptions of wolves...  but giants are only mentioned once and in the hobbit..and as far as i know tolkien never returns to them, or their alliegance in LOTR..we only know they at least help him periodically block up goblin cave entrances
     
    so perhaps, if they arent of 'evil' then they are creatures in their own right... but i dont remember a reference to them in the creation of creatures in silmarillion.
     
    any ideas?
    Richard
  19. Like
    richsabre reacted to Nickpes in Tolkien Lore Q & A   
    In the Book of Lost tales there are mentions on Giants, even names for them. Have read it only once and not own it so I don't remember much more. I also remember that there is a mention that Giants where created by Melcor. If any one has the book he might take a look
  20. Like
    richsabre reacted to gandalfDK in Tolkien Lore Q & A   
    Hmmm good question Raven1015..
    I tend to answer the question with another 'Why would an Istari/Maia not have foresight?'. He is not of Mankind, and although magic has no role as 'magic' in ME, he has powers, great powers.
    But, if I would try to answer, I think not really. IMO he just does what hr thinks is right and as he says about Bilbo 'he gives me courage'. Gandalf took strenght out of the small, simple deeds, so perhaps he was inspired by Merry and Pippins love and friendship with Frodo and saw a strong bond between them, so he insisted on them joining.
    On the other hand, he seems to know a lot of things already before they are reported to him. Frodo not being dead, Denethor mad. And with things of the Hobbit all the same..
    Or maybe it was the Pipeweed.
  21. Like
    richsabre reacted to Raven1015 in Tolkien Lore Q & A   
    Since this is the place to ask a question, I guess I'll ask, How much foresight do you think Gandalf had? There are plenty of examples of him making decisions and believing in people when no one else would, and he always seemed to turn out right. Taking a bet on one little Hobbit named Bilbo dramatically changed the course of events, as without Bilbo, the Dwarves would likely have been eaten by Spiders, ended up locked up forever in Thranduil's halls, etc., and the dragon would still have been alive during the War of the Ring. Another example is him insisting on Merry and Pippin's presence in the Fellowship, which seemed absurd at the time, but they went on to play key roles in victory.
     
    So did Gandalf just really believe in people, especially the smallest and humble of peoples like Hobbits, and he was able to inspire them to the greatest heights? Or, due to his Maia nature, did he have foreknowledge of the future?
     
    This isn't necessarily a question that can be answered, I realize, but perhaps is more of a philosophical destiny vs. free will type question.
  22. Like
    richsabre reacted to Raven1015 in Tolkien Lore Q & A   
    I think it's always important to remember that The Hobbit when it was written originally wasn't intended to be part of Tolkien's broader legendarium. So he probably included giants in The Hobbit because they fit the "fairy tale" quality of that particular story, but didn't necessarily have a part for them in the broader history of Middle-earth. Of course, Tolkien did like to reconcile certain discrepancies in his work, so it's surprising that he never touched on giants more at some later point. Of course, I haven't read every last piece of Tolkien (the histories of Middle-earth are still waiting for me), so it's possible that the answer lies in there somewhere, but I haven't heard of it. 
  23. Like
    richsabre reacted to Estel Edain in Beorning versus Skinchanger   
    There is some support for Beorn's descendants being skinchangers. Towards the end of chapter 18 of The Hobbit, Tolkien wrote:
     
    "Beorn indeed became a great chief afterwards in those regions and ruled a wide land between the mountains and the wood; and it is said that for many generations the men of his line had the power of taking bear's shape, and some were grim men and bad, but most were in heart like Beorn, if less in size and strength. In their day the last goblins were hunted from the Misty Mountains and a new peace came over the edge of the Wild."
     
    The broad language used in this excerpt (about the last goblins) fits The Hobbit, but I don't know of anything in the Lord of the Rings or elsewhere that contradicts it.
  24. Like
    richsabre got a reaction from Nickpes in Tolkien Lore Q & A   
    Thought this would be a cool thread idea... Tolkien lore question and answer ... this isnt me answering lore questions (my knowledge or arrogance doesnt run so deep ) but for the whole forum... if you wonder something on LOTR or related material, ask, and the forum shall answer (hopefully )
     
    Giants... what exactly were they? i mean, we have trolls which are corruptions of ents, orcs are corruption of elves, wargs i assume (?) are corruptions of wolves...  but giants are only mentioned once and in the hobbit..and as far as i know tolkien never returns to them, or their alliegance in LOTR..we only know they at least help him periodically block up goblin cave entrances
     
    so perhaps, if they arent of 'evil' then they are creatures in their own right... but i dont remember a reference to them in the creation of creatures in silmarillion.
     
    any ideas?
    Richard
  25. Like
    richsabre got a reaction from gandalfDK in Tolkien Lore Q & A   
    great thoughts i tend to agree (which echoes my thoughts on your post about skin changers ..which actually gave me the idea for this thread)
     
    it does make me wonder on that note, why sauron ignored such a valuable assest he could have used (it appears to me at least they werent sophisticated and could have been brought under his control easy enough in time)
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