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Simsum

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  1. Like
    Simsum reacted to pearldrum1 in Is there any reason to take Bolter Shells over Hellfire Rounds?   
    The analogy between Star Wars and 40k just made my teeth hurt.
     
    Don't get me wrong, it worked, but it felt like explaining the Holocaust to a five year old using care bear toys.
  2. Like
    Simsum got a reaction from doomande in Forge worlds   
    I would take a page from Paranoia the RPG.
     
    A little bit of knowledge is a dangerous thing, and just like Friend Computer in Paranoia, the upper crust of the AdMec has no real concept of the human condition. The human machine, definitely, but not living, breathing human beings.
     
    There's plenty of drugs in circulation. Human abilities can be enhanced in various ways through specific drugs, and the AdMec tries, in their blundering way, to exploit this to its fullest.
     
    Manufactorum workers work 24 hour shifts and are on massive doses of stimulants, making them careless and prone to fits of rage. Of course the AdMec only understands that they get more consecutive hours per worker when the workers are drugged to the gills. Side effects? What's that?
     
    Children are high on smart drugs during school hours. The rest of the time they're either working or stoned placid. Which of course means that a large percentage go through brutal withdrawal up to several times per day, unless they or their parents can get them what they need on the thriving black market.
     
    Speaking of markets, and recreational areas in general, these are explosions of colour, weird geometric shapes, and all manner of weird smells. Shoppers are expected to drop a few trips to enhance their shopping experience and decrease their expectancy of the goods they buy.
     
    Everyone is excessively polite, even while they're murdering you in a blind, drug-fuelled rage. The AdMec have concluded that politeness decreases friction in the human population, so any lapse in manners is grounds for being turned into a Servitor. People either learn early, or become Cherubs.
     
    Barring worse fates, it is standard practice to turn parental units into servo skulls for the children, once these mature to a certain age. The Servo Skulls maintain much of their practical work experience, and serve as a combination of training wheels and surveillance units for the children. The Servitors do, of course, not maintain any semblance of humanity.
     
    One of the most popular - and secret - cults, is the Cult of Ecologic. These people secretly harbour things like malnourished plants, dangerous, if diminutive, wildlife, and similar, and worship The Emperor as a kind of nature god. Of course, none of them have ever actually seen anything like a natural ecosystem, so they have some pretty **** strange ideas of what exactly it is. And a lot of vicious in-fighting is centred on arguments about this.
     
    The deeper levels of the Forge World are the compressed ruins of thousands upon thousands of years of industry and ultra-technology. Much of which is haunted by archeotech data defence systems, or taken over by rogue or possessed Abominable Intelligences. All of these systems use people to stay alive. Some use people for hosts. Others inspire secret Cults who they then employ as maintenance workers and spies.
     
    ... Really, go find a copy of Paranoia somewhere and drop a pile of gothic on it.
  3. Like
    Simsum got a reaction from pearldrum1 in A Duelist's Weapon   
    Belt fed autopistols with red dot sights.
  4. Like
    Simsum reacted to Lynata in Forge worlds   
    "Not as clumsy or random as lensflares. An elegant movie, for a more civilised age."
  5. Like
    Simsum got a reaction from Lynata in Forge worlds   
    THX1338, incidentally, is one of the best films ever made. There's no way you can go wrong stealing from it.
  6. Like
    Simsum got a reaction from Angel of Death in Forge worlds   
    I would take a page from Paranoia the RPG.
     
    A little bit of knowledge is a dangerous thing, and just like Friend Computer in Paranoia, the upper crust of the AdMec has no real concept of the human condition. The human machine, definitely, but not living, breathing human beings.
     
    There's plenty of drugs in circulation. Human abilities can be enhanced in various ways through specific drugs, and the AdMec tries, in their blundering way, to exploit this to its fullest.
     
    Manufactorum workers work 24 hour shifts and are on massive doses of stimulants, making them careless and prone to fits of rage. Of course the AdMec only understands that they get more consecutive hours per worker when the workers are drugged to the gills. Side effects? What's that?
     
    Children are high on smart drugs during school hours. The rest of the time they're either working or stoned placid. Which of course means that a large percentage go through brutal withdrawal up to several times per day, unless they or their parents can get them what they need on the thriving black market.
     
    Speaking of markets, and recreational areas in general, these are explosions of colour, weird geometric shapes, and all manner of weird smells. Shoppers are expected to drop a few trips to enhance their shopping experience and decrease their expectancy of the goods they buy.
     
    Everyone is excessively polite, even while they're murdering you in a blind, drug-fuelled rage. The AdMec have concluded that politeness decreases friction in the human population, so any lapse in manners is grounds for being turned into a Servitor. People either learn early, or become Cherubs.
     
    Barring worse fates, it is standard practice to turn parental units into servo skulls for the children, once these mature to a certain age. The Servo Skulls maintain much of their practical work experience, and serve as a combination of training wheels and surveillance units for the children. The Servitors do, of course, not maintain any semblance of humanity.
     
    One of the most popular - and secret - cults, is the Cult of Ecologic. These people secretly harbour things like malnourished plants, dangerous, if diminutive, wildlife, and similar, and worship The Emperor as a kind of nature god. Of course, none of them have ever actually seen anything like a natural ecosystem, so they have some pretty **** strange ideas of what exactly it is. And a lot of vicious in-fighting is centred on arguments about this.
     
    The deeper levels of the Forge World are the compressed ruins of thousands upon thousands of years of industry and ultra-technology. Much of which is haunted by archeotech data defence systems, or taken over by rogue or possessed Abominable Intelligences. All of these systems use people to stay alive. Some use people for hosts. Others inspire secret Cults who they then employ as maintenance workers and spies.
     
    ... Really, go find a copy of Paranoia somewhere and drop a pile of gothic on it.
  7. Like
    Simsum reacted to Cogniczar in Is there any reason to take Bolter Shells over Hellfire Rounds?   
    Except, Hellfire rounds were developed for Astartes weapons in 741.M41 on the totally opposite side of the galaxy in response to the tyranids threat in Segmentum Ultima. The paltry century and a half to the game's timeline wouldn't be enough to actually find any meaningful amount of them in the Calixis Sector.
  8. Like
    Simsum got a reaction from Askil in Forge worlds   
    I would take a page from Paranoia the RPG.
     
    A little bit of knowledge is a dangerous thing, and just like Friend Computer in Paranoia, the upper crust of the AdMec has no real concept of the human condition. The human machine, definitely, but not living, breathing human beings.
     
    There's plenty of drugs in circulation. Human abilities can be enhanced in various ways through specific drugs, and the AdMec tries, in their blundering way, to exploit this to its fullest.
     
    Manufactorum workers work 24 hour shifts and are on massive doses of stimulants, making them careless and prone to fits of rage. Of course the AdMec only understands that they get more consecutive hours per worker when the workers are drugged to the gills. Side effects? What's that?
     
    Children are high on smart drugs during school hours. The rest of the time they're either working or stoned placid. Which of course means that a large percentage go through brutal withdrawal up to several times per day, unless they or their parents can get them what they need on the thriving black market.
     
    Speaking of markets, and recreational areas in general, these are explosions of colour, weird geometric shapes, and all manner of weird smells. Shoppers are expected to drop a few trips to enhance their shopping experience and decrease their expectancy of the goods they buy.
     
    Everyone is excessively polite, even while they're murdering you in a blind, drug-fuelled rage. The AdMec have concluded that politeness decreases friction in the human population, so any lapse in manners is grounds for being turned into a Servitor. People either learn early, or become Cherubs.
     
    Barring worse fates, it is standard practice to turn parental units into servo skulls for the children, once these mature to a certain age. The Servo Skulls maintain much of their practical work experience, and serve as a combination of training wheels and surveillance units for the children. The Servitors do, of course, not maintain any semblance of humanity.
     
    One of the most popular - and secret - cults, is the Cult of Ecologic. These people secretly harbour things like malnourished plants, dangerous, if diminutive, wildlife, and similar, and worship The Emperor as a kind of nature god. Of course, none of them have ever actually seen anything like a natural ecosystem, so they have some pretty **** strange ideas of what exactly it is. And a lot of vicious in-fighting is centred on arguments about this.
     
    The deeper levels of the Forge World are the compressed ruins of thousands upon thousands of years of industry and ultra-technology. Much of which is haunted by archeotech data defence systems, or taken over by rogue or possessed Abominable Intelligences. All of these systems use people to stay alive. Some use people for hosts. Others inspire secret Cults who they then employ as maintenance workers and spies.
     
    ... Really, go find a copy of Paranoia somewhere and drop a pile of gothic on it.
  9. Like
    Simsum reacted to Gregorius21778 in Forge worlds   
    Random thoughts about having a Forgeworld feel like a Forgeworld
    the working class wear jumpsuits with the colour of the suit indicating their profession/tasks each of the working class has a large barcode laser tat on their forhead instead of having a cognomen make it a point the surfaces lack the ornamentation so common even among hive worlds. All are sheer besides cogwheel symbol over this or that entrance/doorway servitors are embedded into structures (only head and/or torso and one or two arms “growing” out of a wall)that function as checkpoints, function as “info terminals”, monitor the traffic of wares, tasking and re-direction servo skulls and workers, overseeing the stockpiling and redistribution of goods in a warehouse etc. there are a large number of servo skulls darting and gliding through the air and every larger, occupied area seems to be monitored by at least one of them Enforcers are called “overseers” and are meant to make sure that the human work force isn´t idle “Real people” are either listless and silent or very tense and frantic Every once in a while there a 3 to 6 “alcoves” with arrays of little mechanical arms with tubes of different size attached to them. Some or all of them are occupied with servitors that stop by to “re-norish” themselves and get the “waste material” pumped off from them. A rather quick process and a servitor comes or leaves every 15 to 30 minutes. Workers go about their day in different, rotationg shifts. No matter if it is working, eating, sleeping or “recreational time” There is not much “entertainment” offered. Music and art aren´t endorsed by the Adeptus Mechanicus. As a result, the human workers improvised music, most of it involves a lot of drumming, clapping and stomping. (if you have ever ssen the group “STOMP” you know what I mean). There is “singing” as well but since verbal education isn´t endorsed in workers either it is lacking in lyrics and more rhythm or a lot of “high and low” combined in melody by those with beautiful voices (thing experimental art music here!) There are a lot of “Helots” (human workers with implanted tool-limbs or additional limbs) around. Outside of recreation areas there is no chatting(! Despite what is necessary to do the work. The “overseers” actively disencourage “needles conversation outside of the re-creation shift” The recreation areas sees a lot of quiet talking among exhausted workers, so, and the “food halls” see lots of it You will find NO bars at all. Alcohol and other harmful substances are BANNED. There are alcohol smugglers, but it moonshine and people might go blind from it. Those who do are punished by recycling them for servitor parts Instead of bars, the workers have the large recreation halls (sit, drink flavoured water and have some areas to do stuff like walking games or social talks and such) Much of the social life goes on in the small “hab stacks” so. The overseers do patrol here infrequently (to make sure nobody is sipping booze on the streets or is smoking!) People drug themselves with sniffing glue or solvent, drink booze. Obscura is highly sought and EXPENSIVE Most of the food is grown in hydrocultures and later worked into “bread”, “cake” or paste.. It is nutrious, but blant tasting or horribly artificial in taste. There are “additives” to the food in form of little pills (think of our food additive products in the various forms).

    [EDIT: Removed some of my VERY bad gramma]
  10. Like
    Simsum reacted to Adeptus-B in Fan supplements   
    I've done a bit of tinkering with this:
     
    CHAPTER 4: THE ENEMY WITHOUT
     
    Part 1: The Xeno Threat
    Overview of xeno activities within the Calixis Sector.
    Hrud (stealthy ‘parasites’ frequently referenced in 40K lore)* Morgauth (scavenging reptilids mentioned in The Radical’s Handbook p.200)* Verminthiculians (wild mercenaries and reavers [‘Chaos Wookies’- my take] mentioned Dark Heresy Rulebook p. 258)* Nostrafex (space vampires [my take] mentioned Disciples of the Dark Gods p. 71)* Draethri (smug, condescending masterminds [my take] mentioned in The Radical’s Handbook p.201) Ghurkhul (Cossack-like brigands) ‘Flesh-Reapers’ (Mysterious organ-harvesters) Morphaelaq (Parasitic ‘dream-weavers’ who they produce an addictive narcotic; prolonged use alters the human brain, turning it into food for these aliens) Genestealer Cults? (we might be able to borrow Santiago's cool write-up here) Others? Suggestions welcome *See the NEW XENOS link in my signature below for the first drafts of these species.
    Sidebar: Waaagh! Grimtoof attacking the Spinward Front (largely paraphrased from Only War).
    Sidebar: The secret goal of the Enoulians.
    Sidebar: Rumor of Lictors on Fedrid (expanding on a reference in Creatures Anathema p.95).
    Sidebar: Impending threat of the Rak’Gol approaching through the Koronus Expanse.
     
    Part 2: The Cold Trade
    Overview of Cold Trade activities within the Calixis Sector.
    The League of the Black Crystal (mentioned in Hostile Acquisitions p.134) The Terlain Cluster (mentioned in Daemon Hunter p.68. My take would be that the Gatekeepers found a portal into a fractured, abandoned section of the Eldar webway. Altering it with their own technology, they have turned it into their own ‘pocket dimension’, from which they operate their market, with links throughout the Cluster. They are secretly living in dread of Something Bad, and engage in trade to acquire the supplies they will need to survive when it finally arrives and they cut their mini-dimension off from realspace to wait out the apocalypse.) The Stryxis (nomadic xeno-traders, largely paraphrased from Rogue Trader) Sidebar: Port Wander and Footfall.
     
    Part 3: Xenovirals
    Overview of xeno diseases and the Rites of Innoculation required by Imperial law in order to visit other planets.
    Various sample contagions, including ‘the Ague’, as minor reactions to local pathogens are collectively called in Imperial Guard slang. RedReave (an especially deadly hemorrhagic disease which- in its terminal stage- causes bleeding from the eyes and outbursts of psychotic violence) Josian Pox (a wide-spread disease with frequent outbreaks; it used to be a mere nuisance, but it mutates slightly with each episode, and could turn deadly in the near future) [name pending] (fungal infection that takes over the brain, ‘zombifying’ the victim and eventually causing the head to burst in a spore-filled contagious cloud) Dusk Fever (a common cause of death spread by biting insects in the swamps of the planet Dusk). Hellblight (a powerful weaponized virus engineered by the Yu’Vath during the Angevin Crusade; it is believed to be contained to a few high-security labs…) [name pending] (a sentient parasitic infection which eventually controls the host- loosely inspired by the Stephen King short story I Am The Doorway) Sidebar: Plague devastation of the planet Abairen’s Hope (now called  Abandoned Hope), currently quarantined.
     
    Part 4: Aboriginal and Feral Populations
    Ch’k-Ch’k (ravenous ‘pygmies’ on Zumthor, who’s population is exploding due to Imperial settlers wiping out most of the natural predators which kept their numbers in check). Myrrkynn (a.k.a. the Blue Folk, a near-extinct race on Balecaster, now occupying a role similar to the Sidhe in Celtic lore. They are trying to pass their ancient rituals on to human children- supposedly to avert an impending cataclysm). Ghenji (stone-age tribal aliens living in the jungles of Tygress III). Cephallian [imperial designation, due to enlarged heads; real name unknown] (species believed extinct, known via ruins on the planet Percipre, who have actually transcended to multidimensional existence). Ollopoloa (enslaved population on mining world of Nahme, used to mine valuable minerals on their homeworld, due to toxins in the air making a large-scale human workforce impractical. They are secretly trying to re-learn their race’s long-lost psychic powers in order to revolt against their Imperial oppressors). Feral Orks (boar-riding savages, on Vaxanide and elsewhere). Others? Suggestions welcome Sidebar: On Sentience (Magos Biologis determinants for what constitutes a true 'xeno' vs a dumb animal).
     
    Part 5: Xenobeasts
    Overview of transporting, licensing, and training xenobeasts (referencing The Radical’s Handbook p. 140).
    Prahma-Rex (flightless riding bird from Ichovor) Glitterbugs (dangerous insects from Tygress III, worn as jewelry by decadent Malfian nobles) Gyrinx (psychic Eldar cats from 40K lore, sought as familiars by Imperial radicals) [name pending] (silicate hydraform from the Haddrack deathworld) Others pending; suggestions welcome Sample Carnivora (beast-fighting arena) with maps.
    Sidebar: Inquisitorial suspicions about the Beast House.
  11. Like
    Simsum reacted to Gregorius21778 in What beast should I throw at my rank 5 group?   
    (…)most popular watering-hole in the system:( (…)
    << so the place is having a landing field for surface-to-orbit vehicles? Or is it just –near- such an installment? (see “Gloom Haunt” below)

    (…)that Asteroid in Mass Effect 2 (…)
    I do not even know “Mass Effect 1”. J But I guess I get the picture anyway

    (..)orks (…)hanger (…)
    I am curious: how did those smuggle themselves into the system, anyway? I got it that this world isn´t a “frontier world” anymore.  And why did they strayed so far away from “ork turf” in the first place? As far as I got it they CAME here and aren´t any leftovers from this once-great-war, are they? Far away from home just for “hunting” a creature..they end up not hunting themselves, anyway.

    Imported Fenksworld Pit Thing
    How long has the “pregnant mother” and later “mother and brood” be around in the tunnesl? What did they feed upon? These things are LARGE and the larger a thing is the larger its prey needs to feed on (see “GrimeSlugs”)

    Back2Topic:
    “We have a Guardsman, Scum, Psyker, Assassin, Tech Priestess, and an Adept. We are pretty well rounded.” Since you already have made up your mind regarding your beasties I will simply pester you with some random stuff to incorporate while you are the GM and have them down in that bunker complex.

    The place would not be overly dangerous in its own right, so. People party above it, many a looter will have delved down there over the course of the years and almost all valuables will have been stripped away by the PDF/Imperial Guard before they “abandoned” the installation. After all, it is not like that place was devastated in the war, was it? Last but not least, the mere presence of that Pit Things will have driven off most other things living there expect those quick and small enough to hide from it. Or those too dumb to flee.


    Environmental Effect: Stale Air
    If the lower levels aren´t officially used anymore, there will be no powered ventilation systems that helps bringing fresh air down there. While the complex is large in itself, it wasn´t used for a –long- time. If you feel like it, you could impose a routine(+20) Toughness test on the characters after a couple of hours (or a strenuous scene like “combat” or “running” or “breaking up something that was sealed”. If you use “a couple of hours”, the TB is a good rule of thumb for the “hours” the pc can go on before needing a check.

    If the character in questions does not pass the test, she will gain a point of fatigue. This is not successive. Once a character suffers from that point, she will not get another for this environmental effect. If the air is just “stale/used up” it will not make you drop in its own right.

    Task: Opening Blast Doors
    Since this was a military bunker complex meant to be held against invading troops I guess there will be a lot of “blast doors” installed. Not as entrance doors to different areas but perhaps in the middle of corridors as well. Since the installation wasn´t in use for years, I guess those doors down below aren´t powered anymore. Blast doors usually have some means of “manually” opening them in case of a system power failure (and the power usually comes from a point “farest” form any possible entry angle of invading forces …just to get sure that THEY do not cut off the power).

    So, you can ask for Strength tests ranging from “routine(+20)” to “difficult (-10)”, with the difficulty reflecting the relative amount of time the characters give themselves to get that door open. A failure means a level of fatigue; three level or five level of failures could mean a strained muscle which could be played as -1 to STB for the next one or two days.

    Difficult                      1 Minute; minus 5 seconds for every additional level of success
    Challenging    2 Minutes; minus 5 seconds for every additional level of success
    Ordinary                     3 Minutes; minus 10 seconds for every additional level of success
    Routine                       5 Minutes; minus 15 seconds for every additional level of success

    Of course, somebody with a bit of equipment could bypass the security circuits of the door systems. Use “Tech-Use” or “Security” or “Trade(Technomant)” and the table above, so the times are doubled and there is no fatigue to failed tests…if a character cannot do it quick, she simply has wasted time and can try again with a lower difficulty. Of course, the door needs to be POWERED for that. A Tech-Priest might to this with his Potentia Coil (and the matching talents)… or it could be done with a portable battery pact.

    As they gear up to venture below, ask them for easy(+30) Common Lore (Tech or War) or “Trade”(Technomant) test.If they pass it, there characters are clever enough to foresee that kind of problem & know about the possible solutions to it. Needless to say, a lot of blast doors will already have been opened. Looters haven here, the orks have been here…

    Oh! And if you want to give your characters a moment to pause…have them come along one or more a blast doors that were obviously bend out of shape by something large…doesn´t mean the Pit Thing actually broke it up, but finding those doors bend out of shape with a lot of large claw marks on the surface gives testimony of the size and ferocity of the thing they are going to face…

    Ambient: Rats in the cellar
    If there are humans, then there are rats. This has been true since the dawn of civilization, when we started hording stock. The characters will hardly see of the rats, so. They will see them hushing about in the corner of the beams of the light sources they carry with them, will hear them in the air ducts above them & see their droppings litter the floor in some places. Perhaps they see a dead cadaver or have some jumping at them if they corner them accidently (no real danger, so!). These creatures are NOT the fat, large things you might see in our sewers today. And they are not half as numerous. They will be much smaller, and leaner. Not much waste to go around and no supplies left. The businesses above might simply drop down there waste along old waste chutes, so. The rats feed mainly from this trash and waste from the business going on above them and hunt the insects and other small vermin that inhabit the complex as well.

    If you want to give the characters a clue about the location of a PitThing, have a score of those run towards and past them in PANIC. The aura of those things should be enough to drive them around in large numbers, making them dashing about in the open as their instincts order them to GET AWAY. And again.. the rats are NOT a danger to the acolytes. They are ambience. If the characters fail an awareness test, you can explain to them that they dismissed the sound/motion (of the real danger) as another sign of the rat infection  “at first”.


    Creature: Grimeslugs
    The “Grimslugs” are either native to the planet or they were “brought in” early on with the first settlers…just like sailor ships of the old times spread the rats over the world. Those creatures are best described as naked slugs, but they have only one eye socket, have a much more malleable body (which allows even the largest examples to press themselves through cracks about 4 inches wide) and have color best  described as “a pale and dirty yellow”.

    The “new born” about the size of a thumb but from that point they grow in size slowly but constantly. Most are the size of dogs and the truly “old ones” have reached the mass of a human (cowering on all fours, so). The slow moving creatures are not a danger but a pest. If something but another of their kind moves close to them, they form pseudo-mouthes on their body and spew forth digestive juices onto them. Those stink, they temporarily blind if they hit the eyes (10% chance) and cause a burning sensation on the skin that will quickly die down to an itching skin rash after two combat round. If you don´t –know- about all of that, this comes as quiet a mean surprise, so. And I bet some of your characters will reach for a cantina to water down the “acid” they were just covered in J

    The things simply slime about and take in all the grime and filth and any other organic material they get themselves over, breaking it up slowly, discharging all of the things they cannot digest with the slim they “sludge about on”. Their wobbly bodies are basically edible, but so foul tasting that most predators refrain from it unless starving …or hailing from a chem-wasted environment like the bowls of a hive... A human would need to pass a routine(+20) Toughness test to avoid throwing up).

    Even a large grimeslug is easy to kill. No matter if you try to shoot it or to chop it up, no tests are needed to hit. But since there physique is so simple (and lacking “single vital organs) it needs between 2 and 6  shots (depending on size and weapon used) to kill the larger ones, no matter how well you place them. Flamers do the trick quiet well (one shot). Killing them in melee is easy as well, but one will end up with two to three “hits” of the digestive juices before it is done. Of course, one can just try to hurry by without getting hit by the juices they spew forth (routine Dexterity test).

    In general, these things are meant as answer to “what way my brood eating, anyway?” Of course, the PitThings will decimate the population of Grimeslugs in the installation rapidly! In addition…it is good to give the characters something to waste their ammo on, isn´t it? The fact that “unknown large slimly things encountered in the dark” are good for the mood of a monster hunt is just icing on the cake.

    Have your group encounter the “dried out” slime trails and later some smaller or large life specimen. And as the character get closer to the area where the PitThings roam, make them encounter the dried out “skin husks” of those slugs the PitThing have devoured on sight. This will look a lot like an old, discard piece of plastic plane.

    Creature: Gloom Haunt
    Do you own the “Creatures Anathema” Book? If this “fortress” has its own landing field for shuttles, some “Gloom Haunt” might be encountered below. Use only one of them, so, as a mean little surprise attack to one of the characters… a “side show”, so to speak. They will only encounter one of it. Shall they check the ceiling for the reminder of the session, so.


    Ambience: Markings on the wall
    Have the characters find some old marks made with chalk or spray paint on different walls. Very simple marks, like “X” or arrows point towards the location the characters came from. These are old marks from loot pickers and reclaimators who searched the place for valuables. A routine(+20) test for logic will not only tell that but that the arrows point towards the direction that lead to EXITS (“they found in and wanted to make sure they found back out again”) and that the “X” marks areas that had already been searched. These marks are YEARS old, but since there is no rain or cleaning servitors to wash them away…they simply stay.

    I always suggest to ask for Intelligence (or Navigation) tests to avoid getting lost in large, unknown, unlit places. Unless the characters have some way of tracing their steps themselves.
  12. Like
    Simsum reacted to Askil in When to give Insanity?   
    Insanity is for exposure to horror and madness, the screaming terrors hidden under the thin veil of normality. 
     
    Corruption is for depravity and radioactivity, the secrets that shall not be known and the places one should not go.
     
    Basically: if it`s shocking, hit with WP tests or spash some insanity, if it`s evil quietly slip in some corruption. If it`s an ancient eldritch horror from beyond feel free to apply a generous topping of both.
     
    I also like to give corruption for players engaging in needlessly psychotic moral depravity (as was originally intended) but this is no longer the use in the RAW.
     
    After all, when you fight the inquisition`s war in the shadows it leaves a mark on you. Heretical uber-radicals don`t just wake up evil one day, burn their prayerbook, get a lifetime subscription to SPIKES! magazine and last-second snipe deamonsword on eBay.
     
    They take a series of small, perfectly reasonable steps further and further from the inflexible rules and attitudes of the Imperium.
  13. Like
    Simsum got a reaction from pearldrum1 in What beast should I throw at my rank 5 group?   
    That depends. They've got Fear 2, and they have a seriously weaksauce anti-psychic power aura with a 15 meter range. But neither is likely to be a huge problem to a crew of Rank 6 Acolytes.
     
    Damage-wise Pit Things are relatively weak (d10+10R), and while they have a reasonable chunk of hit points, they've also got the Bestial Trait which means they'll flee pretty easily. In addition, Pit Things are mindless, so as opponents they're completely disorganised and use no tactics beyond trying to eat the closest guy.
     
    +++
     
    If you use a brood with a slightly more dangerous Brood Mother who'll never run while another Pit Thing is alive, you rule that their anti-Psy auras stack, and you rule that that the Pit Things can use pack tactics while the Brood Mother is alive, you may have the makings of a decent challenge for your Acolytes.
     
    I know you nixed the Lictor, but that would be my personal choice. Lictors make for incredibly awesome combat encounters when the Acolytes are strong enough that you can fully unleash the beast against them.
  14. Like
    Simsum reacted to Covered in Weasels in When to give Insanity?   
    Welcome to the forums!
     
    Have your players been sufficiently challenged by Purge the Unclean? I haven't played those adventures personally but I thought they were intended for characters of less than Rank 6.
     
    It seems like your players have insane luck when it comes to rolling Fear tests. That's ok -- if they never fail a Fear test, there's no reason to give them Insanity points from those sources. However, you could "award" a few IP here and there for significant skill check failures. In my campaign, I gave a character 1d5 Insanity when he lost an extended social encounter and had to execute an NPC who would have returned to the Emperor's light had the encounter gone another way. The character was mentally scarred because he was unable to succeed at the task and had to kill someone because of it.
     
    As a rule of thumb, I never award Insanity or Corruption without allowing the players to avoid it in some way. If the Insanity is inflicted by and enemy, I give them a Willpower test to resist it. However, if the players consciously pursue a course of action that could cause Corruption or Insanity (reading heretical texts, collaborating with xenos, etc), they don't get a save. They chose that course, so they can't avoid the consequences with some lucky die-rolling.
  15. Like
    Simsum got a reaction from Korrh in 7th Ed. WH40K   
    Well... I'm not the ideal source, because I mostly disagree with the major criticisms of 6e. But the hilights are something like this:
     
    It's way too ******* random! This covers terrain with random effects, random charge ranges, random psychic powers, warlord traits, and so on. And from the point of view of the Tourney crowd and anyone else who're primarily in it to win it, that strikes me as a pretty legit complaint.
    Not so much warlord traits and terrain, perhaps, but the other random things can definitely change the course of a battle and completely screw you over.
    For a gamer like me, who's in it for the friends and the beer, the chance to paint minis and make awesome terrain, and to write and play story-heavy campaigns, The New Random™ is pretty much an improvement all-round. It's been a huge benefit to the narrative of the battles, as I'm sure you can easily imagine.
     
    Fliers! The addition was a game-changer, and if you're playing to win you are understandably not fond of change. I also think there was a lot of fear that fliers would take over the game, but in my opinion that hasn't happened.
    I'm not altogether in love with all the fliers that have been added to the game. I think some of them need some tweaks. But overall I've been thrilled to add a lot of great and interesting minis to the game, and learning where and how they fit in. And how to take them out.
    Pace of Armylist releases! Again, if you play to win you want the meta game to stay still so you can nail it. Totally understandable, and I really-honestly am not without a lot of sympathy for for this point of view. It's a wargame, not a RPG.
    But - perhaps especially - to someone like me who's been playing since 1e and still approach it as the sort of game that 1e was (a narrative driven skirmish game), and by now has several assloads of minis and entire armies that are or have been in a state of limbo, sometimes for more more than a decade (now gimme back my Arbites you bastards! They're so old and disused they've fossilised), I am thrilled right down to my pinky toes that GW is finally getting their act together and publishing Armylists at a - to me - enormously much less aggravating rate.
    GWs scattershot and mostly totally absent support for their own miniatures has always been my single greatest frustration with the game and the company. OK not always, but ever since 3e it's been a huge issue for me. And for everyone I play with.
     
    Allies! I'm not sure this needs elaboration. It obviously throws a spanner in the meta game-works.
    I assume it's also self-evident why it's a boon for guys with lots of armies and a more narrative approach.
     
     
    6e was, in many ways, a kick in the teeth for the Tourney crowd. Not that they're the only ones who feel that way, but they're the loudest and the - in my opinion - most understandably pissed chunk of the player base.
     
    It also appears that it was a small and experimental step in a very deliberate long-term move towards a more narrative-driven style of play with a lower barrier of entry and better support for long-term players with truckloads of minis.
    That said, 7e is mystery pudding at this point. But the above seems to be the direction they're moving in, and in a strong way.
    I'm not suggesting GW isn't in it for the money. Of course they are. But so is every other developer & publisher on the planet. If your approach to this is "they're just out to fleece everyone", your perspective is going to be distorted.
  16. Like
    Simsum got a reaction from exseraph in 7th Ed. WH40K   
    Mate, my two cents and a couple of walls of hype-train text were unasked for. Yours, however, were specifically asked for.
    So thanks for giving your opinion. And now that I've read it, it's clear I basically straw-manned a hell of a lot of my fellow wargamers, so you have my unreserved apology. All I can say is it wasn't intentional.
    Just as bad, I just about stated outright that GW can't cater to both you and me. And I really don't believe that. I don't even believe it would be very hard to do. The player base hasn't been splitting itself, GW has. And like a lovely little lemming my good sense got carried away by GW suddenly catering only to special little me's snowflake needs, over everyone else's. For no good reason.
    ... Man, the quality of my posts have really been scraping the bottom the last couple of days. Again, I'm sorry guys. I'll try to return to form. Maybe vitamins or something? Dang this is pretty embarrassing
  17. Like
    Simsum reacted to Magnus Grendel in 7th Ed. WH40K   
    Exactly so. Was at WHW this weekend for an event and make the following comments on psychic powers:
     
    My tyranids can muster 5 mastery levels across the army, so I get D6+5 warp charge. High but not off the charts, plus I only get the tyranid powers, not the new rulebook lores (no tyranids summoning daemons, which is good). If I rolled well on the warp charge (both players get the same d6 value), I would usually get 2-3 powers off, but would expect the enemy to stop one about half the time up to about 3/4 of the time, depending on whether they had a psyker on the board, their mastery level and adamantium bloody will, which is more annoying than it sounds on paper when many of your good abilities are witchfires and maledictions. Note that with Ld10 psykers, previously I would have been surprised if I didn't get 4-5 powers a turn cast successfully. There's been a general balancing of abilitiy costs. Those powers that 'everybody used' have generally become warp charge 2+, such as Prescience, meaning you need to throw 5+ dice at them to feel reasonably confident. Yes, 4 should be enough, but if you're throwing 4 you're generally throwing the majority of your dice, so might as well put in an extra one or two to be sure. To summarise - Unless you're laden with mastery levels, casting prescience more than twice is massively unlikely, whereas before every horror unit (for example) would have a herald twin-linking the squad's shots almost as an afterthought. The Worst Case Scenario that I faced was a list with 4 mastery 3 psykers (daemons with daemon princes) getting D6+12 warp charge, and even that wasn't two bad. I had to contend with two 'free' units of daemons appearing during the game, one of which didn't make it to their first turn after appearing (deep striking into a nice bundle, plus being unable to run, plus warp blast equals toasty plaguebearers). Yes, stopping a blessing isn't easy. But it was impossible before, so surely that's an improvement? Leadership is no longer the defining factor in ability. Therefore, Ld9 and Ld8 psykers (e.g. warlocks) are actually useful. Equally, warlocks and wyrdvane psykers are also useful if not using their powers as they still provide you with extra power dice you can fling at the powers of more important and competent psykers elsewhere. My tervigons mostly sat there in the psychic phase humming Bay City Rollers tunes whilst the one guy with Warp Blast lanced things (or whatever I needed at the time) Remember that the rulebook powers are (mostly) unchanged. With a handful of exceptions, there are few 'Dwellers Below' equivalents that can really swing a battle. Yes, I wiped a squad out with Psychic Scream at one point, but it was a five-man space marine unit outside cover. That's not really that hard and it involved a flukey roll. Even summoning a greater daemon sounds good in theory, but (a) the odds of getting the power is limited unless you have many, many psykers, (b) the odds of screwing up casting it are fairly high, © it kills the psyker which usually means a kill point and possibly warlord kill to boot. Perils of the warp is very, very easy with daemonology powers. The perils of the warp is usually an automatic wound but can be much, much worse and can be much, much better. I had the two extremes for the twice I rolled perils: one caused a wound but would have slain an unwounded 6-wound tervigon outright had I failed the leadership check, the other didn't wound me and - at least for the turn - gave the tervigon sufficient bonuses that it would have had a decent chance of slapping a daemon prince upside the head. Yes, the Tau, Necrons and Dark Eldar do nothing in the psychic phase but defend themselves. But, let's be fair, they could do nothing psychic-ly before, either. All they've done is move all the power casting to a single point in the turn and call it a phase. The psychic phase being when it is has certain game effects. For example, 'dominion' extends a sypnapse creature's synapse range. You can't cast it before making instinctive behaviour or rally tests now but you'll see who failed before deciding which psyker needs to switch on his long-ranged antennae. Equally, when facing Imperial Knights, they don't get to shift their ion shields around until the start of the shooting phase - so a witchfire can catch them before they can react and interpose their invulnerable save. You get to move your psyker before casting what used to be 'start of turn' powers, potentially increasing their effective reach. Finally, you have to allocate your melee-boosting powers before you get to see the results of your shooting, which may lead to you wasting powers on people who never make it into an assault.
  18. Like
    Simsum got a reaction from Green Knight in Dark Omega - A Warhammer 40,000 novel   
    Go forth and download Calibre. And then come back and tell me how much you like me for just improving your eBook life by 40,000%
     
    - Calibre is part eBook library software, part conversion software, and part "it even peels potatoes" software. It is the single most important piece of software for anyone who reads eBooks. Doubly so for everyone who has an eBook reader of any kind (phones included),
     
    And when you discover just how amazingly much you love Calibre, do send the guy a couple of bucks. You'll have to admit he's earned it.
  19. Like
    Simsum reacted to ak-73 in Get 2nd ed or tweak 1st ed?   
    I see what you did there...
     

  20. Like
    Simsum reacted to DarkForce2 in Get 2nd ed or tweak 1st ed?   
    Gonna give it a read once I've got a bit more time... pretty busy lately with work, studying and various presentations :/
     
    I do know that BESM: 3rd Edition has a pretty interesting concept of building abilities, weapons, etc, allowing you to build... basically anything... comes at the price of the system being slightly bloated. 
     
    Hmm, I should totally check out that World of Darkness: Mage system or something... if I remember, it has a very interesting concept of magic itself and the rulesystem might work as an inspiration... gonna see if that is of some use, but we should probably move our discussion on the Powers of the Warp and how they can be better expressed in rules to another thread, should we continue these thoughts
  21. Like
    Simsum reacted to Lynata in Get 2nd ed or tweak 1st ed?   
    Something like this must already exist somewhere. There's sooo many games out there ...
    Perhaps GURPS? Or one of those superhero P&Ps where you can build your own powers?
     
    I tried to build something (very) remotely comparable for a German Star Wars game once (probably only interesting if you can read German tho ) ... it basically used the three "common" themes of Sense, Control and Manipulate as categories, and then branched out into a number of disciplines, which each had sub-abilities to unlock. Which you could put further points into for some bonus. However, to get really good at something specific, your character needed to know at least the basics of a connected discipline. For example, you couldn't reach the Advanced level of "Healing" without at least Basic knowledge of "Force Sight". In this way, every single ability was connected to one of the disciplines, promoting a somewhat broader skillset even for characters that would specialise in something.
     
    It was still prefabricated, but the system at least felt like everything was connected/related to everything else rather than just a random assortment of spells. And you had the option of basically "inventing" new abilities by combining two disciplines as a new Force Secret - with approval of the GM, of course.
     
    Maybe something like that would at least be a good starting point - unless someone manages to come up with a good idea on how to construct and properly balance a sort of toolkit that lets you go wild? I'm sure this would be the best possible solution simply for the creativity it allows the player to exert, and how it reflects the inner workings of the Warp, but it sure would be a tough job to get it right!
  22. Like
    Simsum reacted to DarkForce2 in Get 2nd ed or tweak 1st ed?   
    hmm... maybe a system, where you get alloted a pool of points according to your psy-rating which you can then use to increase certain aspects? Like "Range, Mind Control, Information-Extracting, Number of Targets" for Telepathy, or "Lifting Power, Precision, Force, Range, Target-Count" for Telekinesis, with increasing Psy-Rating first leading to the ability to manifest more aspects of the power at the same time (or increase power of one aspect) while later allowing for interesting combinations...
     
    WOuld certainly be interesting
  23. Like
    Simsum got a reaction from Lynata in Location-based critical damage - separate or stupid?   
    Equally you could ask: why shouldn't it?
    I totally respect that you like hit points. More, I'll readily concede yours is the majority opinion.
    It's just not an opinion our group shares.
    That said, we do actually track a HP pool as well, sort of. Specifically, a target in our games can take a total number of injuries equal to its Toughness Bonus +4, and in addition to the penalties from Locational damage, every time a Target is injured beyond TB+4 divided by 2 (round up), it has to make a modified (starting at +60) Toughness Test or become incapacitated.
     
     
    Actually, Inquisitor both tracks Total and Locational damage. And tracks both in a great deal more detail than we do. Our system is designed for ease of use and easy memorisation. Inquisitor's is designed for style.
     
    We use that rule too. Or, we kind of do. The point of most of our combat isn't the actual combat. I typically throw combat at the players if they need some encouragement to get a move on, and I often use combat as a means of conveying important information about enemies (FX: the fact that there is an enemy). For those kinds of combat, the details really don't matter and the outcomes are mostly a foregone conclusion.
     
    But we do occasionally have full on skirmish battles using terrain and miniatures. And when we have those, exhaustive detail is kind of the point. They're combats for the sake of combat. And in those, exploding goons may or may not be fitting.
  24. Like
    Simsum got a reaction from Adeptus-B in Get 2nd ed or tweak 1st ed?   
    To be fair, that's how powers have always been treated in terms of game mechanics for all of GWs IPs.
    But oh man, I can't express the depth of my agreement. I wish some clever soul out there would come up with a completely new system.
  25. Like
    Simsum reacted to Adeptus-B in Get 2nd ed or tweak 1st ed?   
    The DH2 system is probably an improvement, but in my opinion it makes the same core mistake of all the WH40KRP psychic power systems: treating powers like D&D magic spells. Rather than narrowly-focused powers, I would prefer broad categories of powers that can be 'sculpted' by the psyker for various effects, with the overall power level determined by the Psi Rating of the psyker. Hence, a 'Telepathy' category power could be used to send psychic messages over short distances at Psi Rating 1, or to dominate a mob of people at Psi Rating 5. 
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