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korjik

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Everything posted by korjik

  1. For clearing out cultists, or scummers or the like: Bodies by Drowning Pool
  2. I did finally get mine a few days ago. Great book, tho I will have to keep the Rogue Trader in my group from reading up on the other Rogues. Otherwise he will end up with a bunch of murder servitors and a titan that look just like him..... of course, the only problem now is: I WANT MORE!
  3. The only reference I have seen in Rogue Trader is a couple Strike Crusiers of an unknown chapter showing up at Footfall. You might try looking in Deathwatch. There is a chapter mentioned in the Deathwatch rules that is supposedly in the area. You could also make up your own tho. There are a couple hundred unnamed chapters still, so you could make up whatever fluff you wanted. Or you could just use an established chapter. You cant really ever go too far wrong by using Ultramarines (or one of their sucessors). All sorts of fluff about the chapter is available, and you can always use some sort of warp anomaly to explain why they are in the expanse. At least that is what I was going to do.....
  4. since we arent given the full timestamp, we dont have any accuracy data on those dates. Without the timestamps, all those dates could be accurate, because all those dates are local, not universal.
  5. In the discussion of Profit Factor, there is a section on unusual aquisitions. That should cover anything not in the armoury.
  6. BaronIveagh said: korjik said: There arent many things the players can do that changes the game more than getting a second ship. It is something that should not be entered into lightly. If the GM hasnt thought about the effects of the second ship, he could get quickly overwhelmed when the players start taking advantage of the capabilities of having two ships. Another thing is, if you make getting a ship part of the plot of the game, having a blown roll mean you dont get the ship is alot of suck for any game to handle. That isnt to say that there arent times to use a random roll. If the players take the effort to board and capture a ship in a random combat, I would roll to see if the ship is in good condition or not. The OP seemed to have a more plot driven situation, so the decision to give the players a ship should be driven by the GM's plot, not random chance. Random chance is not more fair than a reasoned decision. I can say that having five ships had nearly zero impact on my game. If you treat the party in the 'Star Trek Command Crew' mold, it breaks things. If you treat them in the '40k' mold, it's just one more thing to get shot at. The reason is simple: if the party has more then one ship, the enemy probably has more then one ship too. Or they have a bigger ship. Or more then one bigger ship. And while most of you are going... "but... but that sounds like.... oh my god-emperor.... BATTLEFLEET GOTHIC!" Yes it does, yes it does, and yes, it is. Particularly if played on a 20'x20' table. where the entire solar system (as far as their auspex can see, anyway) is laid out. (and, for those who do feel that them getting additional ships is a problem, have them play the Whispers on the Storm adventure. The end boss is quite capable of annihilating several ships before going down. The party lost a light cruiser and two escorts to it and it's six escorts, WITH the lunar class cruiser's help AND covering lance fire from the station.) What you seem to be missing is that I am not saying 'Dont give them any more ships!', but that I am saying 'Make sure you think about it first'. If someone is playing a command crew type situation, then the addition of a ship is very different than if you are not. Oddly enough, that is something that should be thought about by the guy running the game (at the least, I tend to plan that sort of thing out with my players). Another thing, I havent said a thing about what I am doing in my game. Please dont make assumptions on what I am doing. I dont suggest caution because I think things should be minimized, I do it cause my players are old-style Battletech players who will try to salvage anything that even looks like it might have a functioning plasma drive. They are also extremely larcenous. They are also extremely good at making their own rewards. With my group, if a pirate raider takes a potshot at them, then gets away, they are going to try their damndest to follow the thing back to its base, then take out the base, loot it, and take all their ships. Even if that derails what I had planned for the night. So I have to think about that sort of thing, otherwise, I will end up in a game where the players are seriously considering stealing a battleship, just cause they can, and just because the fleet they own is big enough that they could probably keep it. Another another thing: Just because you know that you didnt roll for it, dosent mean the players do. The reverse is also true: Just cause you know you rolled for it, that dosent mean the players know. The appearance of randomness is far more important than the actuallity. I've been playing with the same group for a long time. I know how they think and act and can place a 'random' encounter or trap where I know they will run into it. I may be a bit spoiled as a GM cause of that, but I have found that less randomness leads to a more stable, longer game. After all, the point is to have fun, not roll dice. p.s.: How do you move ships around that are in the center of a 20x20 table? Biggest I have done is a 8x8 and that was getting to be a bit of a pain in the center of the table.
  7. riplikash said: korjik said: Why do you have to be fair to the players? Why is a random roll more fair than an educated decision on how another ship would fit into the campaign? Part of my point is that all decisions on the condition of the ship are made by the GM. If I dont want the players to salvage a ship, then condition of the ship is going to make it not possible, and if I want them to have the ship, then the ship will be salvageable. Either way, there will be an endevour involved. Either salvaging parts or the ship has a whole. For the most part you want to minimize the feel that everything is happening according to the GMs whims. If you are making all the decisions as gm fiat than their accomplishments feel hollow, like you just gave it to them. There is no luck, no overcoming insurmountable odds, no achievement, they are just playing through the GMs storybook. They feel like enounteres are tailor made, items are handpicked, and their choices amount to little more than a "choose your own adventure" book. The more you randomize and take decisions out of the hand of the GM the more of a sense of accomplishment your players have. Their accomplishments are their own, their luck is real, and their decisions matter. A GMs job is mainly to provide a realistic universe, engaging locals, dasterdly plots, interesting foes, and to keep things from getting out of control.. Typically the GM should try to avoid tailoring encounters and aquisitions to the party. Throw interesting situations at them and your players will figure it out. So, after finding out about a ship graveyard, making a deal with the Adeptus Mechanicus for a salvage crew, finding the graveyard infested with orks, getting a regiment of troops for boarding actions, spending months doing hit and run attacks to kill off the patrolling ork raiders, boarding the prize and fighting though an ork horde, finishing up with a massive battle against the Warlord on the bridge of the prize, and you think that the players wont have a sense of accomplishment because I go "Now this ship is yours"? Or worse yet, what happens if after that I go 'sorry, rolled a 87. The ship is not salvageable'. There arent many things the players can do that changes the game more than getting a second ship. It is something that should not be entered into lightly. If the GM hasnt thought about the effects of the second ship, he could get quickly overwhelmed when the players start taking advantage of the capabilities of having two ships. Another thing is, if you make getting a ship part of the plot of the game, having a blown roll mean you dont get the ship is alot of suck for any game to handle. That isnt to say that there arent times to use a random roll. If the players take the effort to board and capture a ship in a random combat, I would roll to see if the ship is in good condition or not. The OP seemed to have a more plot driven situation, so the decision to give the players a ship should be driven by the GM's plot, not random chance. Random chance is not more fair than a reasoned decision.
  8. BaronIveagh said: Yeah, but just saying 'You you want them to YES/NO?' isn't very fair to the players. My rule of thumb is generally 'is the hull mostly intact?' If so, I roll random components, with a 50% chance that each is damaged beyond repair or has already been stripped from the wreck. Then I make the players make an aquisition check to get the specalized equipment and personnel to move it, with a bonus based on how many times they have done this in the past and their reputation with the AdMech. They then have to tow the wreck to drydock, which is a difficult test for the navigator, as they have to plot the course for two or more ships to all arrive together. Once at drydock, they have to make aquisitions checks, with normal modifiers, to replace the ruined parts. Basically I make the whole thing a short endevour and then give them a time estimate on how long it will take. Usually repairs that extensive take about an in game year. Why do you have to be fair to the players? Why is a random roll more fair than an educated decision on how another ship would fit into the campaign? Part of my point is that all decisions on the condition of the ship are made by the GM. If I dont want the players to salvage a ship, then condition of the ship is going to make it not possible, and if I want them to have the ship, then the ship will be salvageable. Either way, there will be an endevour involved. Either salvaging parts or the ship has a whole.
  9. Technically, the minimum is that you need tools to take stuff apart and room on your ship to haul it back to where you can sell it. The question is: Do you want them to have another ship? If yes, then the chance is 100%. If, no then the chance is 0% That would be nice. Hulks are pretty varied things tho. Prolly more likely that you would want to make clearing the hulk part of an adventure. As for salvageable goods, that is all part of the Profit Factor. You dont need to worry that they have salvaged a plasma drive off of a wrecked frigate if all they are going to do is sell it. You just add to their profit factor. Do you have the Imperium take a cut of anything else? If not, then it probably isnt the best idea to have tax on the salvage. Other institutions would get involved as needed. Should the players want some serious help with the salvage, they could go to a forge world and get some Mechanicus help. The Tech-priests may want the players to do a job or two for them tho. Heck, you could make this a pretty big endeavour. First part is survey the graveyard, second is get Adeptus Mechanicus help, third is tow the salvaged ships back to footfall for makeshift repairs, fourth is get a dockyard to refit and repair the ships. Along the way you could have a bunch of side jobs, like have the players go check out an eldar ship for one of the tech-priests, or go get rid of the union organizers keeping the dock from working. At the end, give some PF for finishing, then an extra PF per 100 achievement points.
  10. Bolt Pistol to the back of the head. If it is good enough for a Guard officer who runs away, it is good enough for a cowardly retainer.
  11. If you dont like it, dont use it. In the game I am starting, I had the idea that the Rogue Trader was the heir apparent to a very ancient lineage of 'Traders. He was given some seed money and a sweet ship and told to go make a fortune or dont come back. Yet when we went and made characters, when the roll was made to get SP and PF, the roll was to have a huge PF and minimum SP. So, I talked over my idea with the players, and they much preferred to do my idea over the roll. So we dont use the roll. My void master wants to use a shotgun (for close encounters, of course ). I will prolly just give him basic weapon SP for free so he can use it. Rules dont allow it, but so what? Any game system has its odd bits. If you dont like them, do what you want.
  12. The Astronomican can reach exactly as far as the plot needs it to.
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