Bowoodstock

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  1. Yeah, and it's clearly a PBEM only sort of thing since it needs a game master, and players aren't aware of each other at the start. But it's downright creative in my opinion.
  2. FOUND IT! http://checkwolf.com/explorers/
  3. Indeed. Do remember the following also. A system with more than one dock can build at all of them (Important for system build cap). What's more, With enviro compensator, and sarween tools, you get more than one free resource to play with. This is why most Hacan players just build all docks in their home system. 3 free resources per build is amazing. Now, this doesn't mean you can funnel all 3 into one massive build, the free resource must be used at the individual dock it was produced at. (That is, you still need at least 11 production, not 9, to build a war sun), You're more than welcome to use those extra resources to fill up its hangar bay, or make a destroyer escort!
  4. Electrojacques: In a way yes, in a way no. 1. You do have your starting spacedock, so you can begin producing there right away. Of course, I know that's not entirely what you were asking. 2. The short answer is yes, it takes 3 rounds to begin producing units in a system other than your homeworlds. One to take the system, one to build the dock, one to build the units. So as far as expansion is concerned...yes, if there is a system nearby with really good production values, you may want to go for it early. Granted, if you're playing something like Hacan who has a really solid starting system, you may not need it as badly. Note that I highly suggest getting shattered empire. While some people are a fan of the core strategy cards, they are usually regarded as inferior to the alternative ones introduced in the expansion packs. Not only does it get rid of the guaranteed 2 points for nothing, but it adjusts the pace at which the objective cards come out, so the game ends less abruptly. Those who do want to play with the originals will often substitute in the "Imperial II" strategy card, which is somewhat breaks the "Must Pick" cycle of strategy cards 1 and 8.
  5. All good. Enjoy your game.
  6. Original TI3 rules, page 19, Wormholes A system containing a wormhole is considered adjacent to any other system containing another end of its wormhole type. I'll give it to you that before the FAQ was released, this was unclear, there was nothing to prevent deep space cannon from firing through wormholes. But if I'm not mistaken, they clarified that within the first FAQ/Errata (See below), so this has been the rule for most of the game history. But this is the only place it was this unclear, and it was swiftly fixed by FFG. FAQ page 8: Miscellaneous Q: When are systems containing matching wormholes considered adjacent? A: These systems are considered adjacent for movement purposes only (including Transfer Actions). This means that you cannot fire PDS cannons through, annex planets through, or use the Integrated Economy technology through. This is the baseline, applies to everything rule. Of course racial abilities are the exception to the rule, but only insofar as stated. Just because a new ability is given to a new race, does not undo previous versions of the FAQ, unless otherwise stated. The creuss race sheet very clearly says "You may treat A and B wormhole systems as if they were adjacent". Using the same word as in the core rulebook, which is then modified by the same FAQ (Because it's still the same game, albeit with expanssions, the core rules are still followed). Creuss are a race specializing in wormholes, but they still follow the same rules as anyone else EXCEPT WHERE STATED. They have the listed special abilities regarding wormholes, no more, no less. Thus, within the context of wormholes, the rule modifies the core rulebook rule regarding A and B, it makes no mention of deepspace cannon or diplomacy, or integrated economy, thus that aspect of the rule stays the same. They don't make the two systems magically appear next to each other allowing a deep space cannon shot. To think otherwise is being downright munchkiny Of course, all that is completely moot because of the following amendment in the FAQ after the release of Shards. FAQ page 12: Under the "Ghosts of Creuss" section. Q: Do the Ghosts of Creuss treat “A” and “B” Wormhole system as if they were adjacent for movement only? A: Yes. They follow the normal rules for Wormholes and are considered adjacent for movement purposes only.
  7. https://images-cdn.fantasyflightgames.com/ffg_content/Twilight Imperium 3/ti3faq.pdf page 12. Says it plain and clear. Movement only. Again I'll reiterate (Even though the FAQ makes it black and white). You don't get to assume you have an ability just because they left out whether you do or not. If not otherwise specified, go to the default rule.
  8. I'm trying to find something I saw online a long time ago. I'm curious if anyone remembers this, and knows where to find it. Someone (I don't know who) put together a massive TI game online, featuring 8 players, a 9th exploration strategy card, and a spiral shaped galaxy that was built as the game progressed, with wormholes connecting various spiral arms to each other. The game was only possible online because they used way more than just the standard ABCD wormholes, and because of the exploration strategy card. Does anyone remember this, or know the ruleset they used?
  9. Rule of thumb for board game rules. Just because the rules DON'T say you can't do something, does not mean you can. That is to say, when no rule or special ability is explicitly stated, you follow the default rules as written. If you follow the standard rule of thumb for board game exceptions, wherein the exception to the rule only exists as stated, the logic is as follows. Standard rule: A considered adjacent to to A, B considered adjacent to B, both for movement purposes only, PDS cannot fire through wormholes. Creuss exception: A is considered adjacent to B. The exception to the rule only mentions A connecting to B. It makes no mention of PDS, thus you must assume that the rule stands as normal.
  10. So, I'm going to be running a new group through a modified version of the beginner game scenario, and its sequel (Long arm of the hutt). One of the players is playing a droid tech. I'm planning on giving them the chance for their first project on board the krayt fang, in the form of the "collection of various droid parts" found in the workshop of the freighter. Now, this is a player I've known for a while who usually goes outside the box in the things they do. Can make for interesting, yet difficult situations. And I just KNOW that when it comes to the first few scenarios, they're going to want to do the following; 1. Steal parts off of defeated guard droids. To give you an idea of the kind of thing they're after, they've armed their character with a vibro weapon instead of a blaster for easy removal of parts. They actually didn't get a mechanics toolkit to start, but that's going to be remedied very soon. Regardless, is there any precedent for salvaging parts off defeated droids? I have special modifications on back-order, so if there's something in there that will be helpful, but I would appreciate any suggestions or past experiences other GMs have had, because they're going to continue wanting to do it any time we run into droid foes. 2. The droid that belongs to the junkyard dealer, the one that can be convinced to steal the hypermatter igniter. We know it doesn't like its master....but I'm assuming that it has some kind of loyalty programming that prevents it from running off. What is to stop this PC from trying to steal and/or convince the R5 droid to leave the junkyard dealer? I feel like "Hey free R5 droid" is just a little too easy, as expensive as astromech droids are. 3. They want to make a "salvager droid" that can be left on its own to steal and/or acquire parts if it's dropped off on a junkyard world like ord mantel. There's a whole lot I can think of that could go wrong with this. I want them to have a little fun with it, make something practical, but again, I don't want "Hey, free parts" without any effort beyond the initial crafting of the droid. Any advice here would be greatly appreciated.
  11. One of my groups favorite NPC's that I created Was a sword. Used the rules from 1st edition to make a demonic weapon, and made it have a personality. Essentially, it was snarky as hell, and only the group psyker could really control the thing due to WP saves. The best part was that its personality meant that for a while, they didn't take the thing seriously. It was the adventure where the psyker got knocked out, and our tech priest decided he wanted a chance to use the weapon....and was promptly possesed as he rolled a 95 then a 99 (fate point) on his willpower save. The group spent 30 minutes trying to beat the guy into submission without killing him, with one person almost losing an arm to the sword.
  12. I just started a new campaign of DH2 with my group of friends. They've played Rogue Trader for a while with me, so they're familiar with the D100 system, and we did go over some of the differences between DH2 and RT. We just hit our first combat in Dark Pursuits (The old manufactorum with Zax Holothane)....and I have to ask if anyone else has had concerns about the difficulty. I'm aware that DH2 is at a much lower power level than RT, and I reminded them of this fact. That being said, since most people only have access to nothing better than a lasgun (exceptions: Someone picked up a sniper rifle at character gen, and our outcast has a chainsword), I'm finding the soak thresholds of most npcs to be ridiculously high. The encounter lead-up states that zax has roughly a dozen hired lasguns with him. I lowered that number to 6, and even with some creative use of scenery (blowing up a promethium tank and using cover) it took forever to take down even his hired lasguns. Unless people preemptively pick up SP weapons with man-stopper ammo, it is REALLY hard to get past armor and toughness. Reading further ahead, I'm looking at the final encounter with the daemonhost, and I just have NO idea how they're supposed to stand a chance against something that soaks 14 damage on a hit with no penetration. Does anyone have suggestions, ways that they've re-tuned the encounters, or am I missing something on how this is supposed to work?
  13. Don't i seem to recall in the book somewhere that by default, obligation can't go lower than 5 per player?
  14. So I'm about to have my first session with a group tomorrow. I'm pretty familiar on most of the rules, but I could use a little assistance in one area. One of my players has chosen a droid character. This of course isn't an issue, but it does bring up some questions. Here's a basic list. 1. Strain. There are things that are stressful to organics, but not to droids. I imagine that there are some things that are the opposite. Would appreciate ideas on this. 2. RAW state that droids don't need to sleep, but it's my understanding that they also need recharging every now and then. This droid is downright paranoid of being memory wiped while inactive (His backstory is that he's a security droid that gained a sentient personality due to a botched wipe), so are there any mechanics that I've missed that are in relation to this? 3. Any in game experiences on how climate, weather, environmental conditions have affected droids differently than organics? Would appreciate any gained knowledge and/or funny stories.
  15. Nitpicking note, they're probably repulser rather than maglev. ....Not necesarily correct note, depending on the circumstances of the setup. Key difference, which may make a difference for the adventurers. Repulsorlift vehicles don't require rails, are required to carry their own power source, and also are able to attain a fairly high altitude. Maglev vehicles (which most rail vehicles in the stories are, and they do specifically mention magnetic rails) require rails, are able to get their power via the electrified rails (more room for cargo), and are bound to the track. This is important because with a maglev train, if the group decides that they're going to try and mess with the rails and/or power source, it's actually possible to do this. With a repulsor train, that is not the case. Note, most maglev trains do have emergency backup repulsors for the rare event of a derailment, but as afore mentioned, repulsors require an onboard power source, so the emergency repulsors aren't going to be for anything other than that. End point and fact, be sure to identify the mechanism of the vehicle in your adventure, in case it matters for your group. I know that the trains on kessel were specifically magnetic in nature.