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Elochim

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  1. Time is a big thing in games like Netrunner since you have to play two games in a short amount of time and it can often fail to produce clear winners (lots of people going 1-1 vs each other). CoC gives you a clear winner and instead of playing the same opponent three times you get to play against more people. As for sideboards CoC has a great resource system that allows you to play a few counter cards in your deck and just resource them against people that don't play supports for example. Introducing a side board takes that away completely and forces more games to be played before deciding a winner, which is a symptom of bad design in Magic, not depth of game play. There is one more thing to consider when discussing number of games and times, and that is that playing more games per round makes rush archetypes (that rule the field as it is already) even more dominating, since a fast deck can lose a game due to bad luck and have time to come back and win two quick games while a slow, controlling deck often will run out of time if you have to play three games. The current tournament rules are my absolute favorite in any card game I play (I am not a good player by a long shot in any game though) since you play one deciding game against each opponent, making surprise decks and reading your opponent viable strategies. You get to play more opponents during a tournament and there is no artificial elements of meta-gaming during the tournament at all, just deck vs deck, pure and simple. If you know all the cards you can read at least 2/3 of an opponents deck from the initial resourcing and with the brilliant resource systems you should be able to have at least some counters against most decks (Yithians not so much), so there really is no need to add lots of fixes to a game that actually works as intended without them. Just my two cents.
  2. I also have the old game with all the expansions and will definetily buy at least one box of the new one, just too be able to deckbuild with two complete sets if nothing else! Best. Reprint. Ever.
  3. (This post was meant to be sent to user chrismata who ffg mailed a friend resquest from, but since I cannot find that user via the friend finder or message function I write this post instead. The message contained a question about my now defunct CoC LCG Cube). Sadly I took my cube apart, mainly to build decks but also because I had no-one to draft with. I never even got around to putting together a list of the cards I used. Should have done that at least but alas. The biggest problem with the cube was having enough cards to build 2-3 faction decks after drafting. Since you have 8 factions (compared to five in Magic) you have a much harder time getting enough cards, especially since you can¨'t fill up your decks with lands after drafting and splashing a few cards is really hard. What I would urge you to do is build a cube of 540 cards (I had 60 of each faction and 60 neutrals). Drafting was done with four boosters of 15 cards each which means the cube can be used by up to eight people. Boosters also has to be stacked (just as you do in most magic cube drafts) so that at least one card of each faction is in each pack. This takes some setup but means that packs won't be filled with just two or three factions (very important if you draft with less than eight people). That's the basics and works quite ok. What I found to be a bit harder due to the limited card pool was choosing which cards should be in the cube and which should not. Just cut the chaff and use those cards you like I would say, I have built a 360 card All Commons cube for magic and that meant some tough choices. In CoC there just isn't enough cards to make cube-building all that fun. In the end though, hit me up on skype as linus.rade.sfr and we can talk more about cubing with CoC. I had a great time the few times I got to do it, but since that was so rarely and since cubing isn't that deep with such a shallow card pool I went back to building decks instead. Would love to help you out though and even though I haven't got my own cube around I could still help you out with things like themes and what cards work in a one-off draft enviroment and which do not. Best regards.
  4. (This post was meant to be sent to user chrismata who ffg mailed a friend resquest from, but since I cannot find that user via the friend finder or message function I write this post instead. The message contained a question about my now defunct CoC LCG Cube). Sadly I took my cube apart, mainly to build decks but also because I had no-one to draft with. I never even got around to putting together a list of the cards I used. Should have done that at least but alas. The biggest problem with the cube was having enough cards to build 2-3 faction decks after drafting. Since you have 8 factions (compared to five in Magic) you have a much harder time getting enough cards, especially since you can¨'t fill up your decks with lands after drafting and splashing a few cards is really hard. What I would urge you to do is build a cube of 540 cards (I had 60 of each faction and 60 neutrals). Drafting was done with four boosters of 15 cards each which means the cube can be used by up to eight people. Boosters also has to be stacked (just as you do in most magic cube drafts) so that at least one card of each faction is in each pack. This takes some setup but means that packs won't be filled with just two or three factions (very important if you draft with less than eight people). That's the basics and works quite ok. What I found to be a bit harder due to the limited card pool was choosing which cards should be in the cube and which should not. Just cut the chaff and use those cards you like I would say, I have built a 360 card All Commons cube for magic and that meant some tough choices. In CoC there just isn't enough cards to make cube-building all that fun. In the end though, hit me up on skype as linus.rade.sfr and we can talk more about cubing with CoC. I had a great time the few times I got to do it, but since that was so rarely and since cubing isn't that deep with such a shallow card pool I went back to building decks instead. Would love to help you out though and even though I haven't got my own cube around I could still help you out with things like themes and what cards work in a one-off draft enviroment and which do not. Best regards.
  5. First of all, thanks for the spoiler, I think many like me wait eagerly every month for them and the discussion about the cards to follow. I usually don´t write much on the forums since I haven´t got the time to put my cube down on paper (and the following discussion about the 500 cards it contains). I hope to get a little more time soon though, and I have decided to not touch my cube until this full cycle of asylum packs have been released in order to test it out, so to get started with the posting I decided to review this pack from (mostly) a cube/highlander perspective. Without futher ado, on to the cards: Customs Agent = 6/10 Synergises with cards like Torch the Joint to give mono-agency a decent resource-disruption plan. It’s high cost, low skill, loyalty and government subtype all demand a certain kind of mono-agency deck and therefor don´t disrupt the rest of the game as resource-destruction can do in other games. It has to be said though that resource-destruction is quite a boring strategy if too effective, and I mostly give it high marks because it’s a character and its ability in multiplayer games to stop a player without blocking. So I think it will go into the cube but I am not 100% certain yet. Flush them out = 8/10 A really fun and not at all overpowered agency-event. Prohibitive cost but massive pay-off in the right circumstance. Especially if you play a lot of cenacle-multiplayer like me it can wreak havoc. Even in single player games it really makes the most of high-cost Agency-characters with equipment (lightning gun + this = fun, fun, fun!). Will have a place in the cube for certain, though it´s effectiveness in single player game can be discussed due to its high cost. Uroborus = 8/10 With great power comes even more power…. to sum up the Cthulhu-faction in one sentence. Serpents were already quite powerful, now they get a great response to removal (which in the current environment is very powerful) with no cost whatsoever and isn’t even unique. Will fit like a glove into the cube where the highlander-format tones down its power, but I would not like to play against this in a regular single player game (Horrific light a high skill snake = massive card advantage with this and Dreamlands fanatic, 6 skill, two terror, two combat, arcane, fast, no cost, those two together is insane). Makes the choice between snakes and deep ones harder for mono-cthulhu, which is fun for everyone that plays mono-cthulhu but not so much so for everyone else…. Sibilant cry = 6/10 Laughable compared to the above, but with Get it off! to deal with Snow graves it can turn the game around late game for a serpent deck, so it gets decent marks. Will not fit into a cube though because of the limited number of snakes available, having two others available to trigger Uroborus is not that hard, but having enough snakes to make this one able to deal with massive skill Ancient Ones late game is quite frankly impossible in a highlander format without massive luck in both draft and play so it’s not really worthvile. Elise Warren = 7/10 Anything that makes mono-Hastur feasible makes me happy and this gal actually does. Invulnerability is really powerful, and a mono-Hastur (possibly with Cthulhu support for Somnambulant dreamer) will have no problem boosting her skill. The problem of having to reliably remove an opponents terror icons still remain for mono-Hastur though. It will definetily go into the cube as a great blocker and massive multiplayer character for Hastur. It will not win games on its own but will provide a hard-to-remove-character with good skill, roleplayers that Hastur is quite light on. Whisper in the Wind = 5/10 Could be a nice boost to a lunatic theme deck, but it gets a lower score since highlander formats such as the cube cannot provide the number of lunatics needed for it to shine. Loyalty can be a problem in a cthulhu/hastur lunatic deck, as well as the fact that it only restores and doesn´t ready but I could still see it being a hard choice between this and arkham asylum if you just get a critical number of lunatics out. It can provide a bigger surprise than the asylum for a smaller cost, the question to be answered is if that negates the machine-gun-power of the asylum? Sonje Olson = 5/10 Really not as bad as the score might make her look, but everything she does other characters do better. Museum curator tutors support cards much cheaper, other 4 cost characters allows you better struggle-boosts (her tome ability is quite bland compared to blanking/exchanging resolution icons), but she isn’t bad in a vacuum. The problem being that cards don’t exist in a vacuum. Constant tutoring is of course nothing to be sneared at but I doubt we will see her played a lot. Dr. Laban Shrewsbury = 10/10 Mono-Miskatonic for the win! A card that will allow you to auto-beat Villainous characters and in most other circumstances play with a 47 card deck. That is actually exactly what Miskatonic needs to start having a go at the other factions. It still will auto-lose to the midgame (or possibly first turn…) punch of snakes and their ilk (ghouls…) but it´s a step in the right direction. The professors have really lacked a dirty trick of their own but with this card the card draw/discard mechanic really starts to pick up pace. Together with Professor Morgan and Anthropology interns you can really set up some nasty surprises for your opponent. Playing heavily on draw/discard is still not nearly powerful enough to contend but at least you have a game-plan and ways to deal with Ravagers, Yig, Y’golonac and Glaaki. Celaeno fragments = 4/10 Sure it has synergy with tomes, but there are other discard tutors for Miskatonic that are much more reliable and tutoring from the discard pile is quite worthless in an environment heavy with Snow graves. If I had a cube with a heavy tome-focus it could be worthwile but as of right now I don’t have enough tomes to make it worthwile (especially in such a support-focused faction as Miskatonic). The big question with this card is wether it’s ok to play 3 of this and 3 of the Celano fragments since they are spelled differently… I would say no, at least in casual play, but the real question is what FFG intends with their very flavorful spelling-mistakes in a competitive environment (where this should not be played, but still). Lucas Corn = 8/10 This guy is just so much fun! I love steadfast, especially multi-faction steadfast (and would love to see a deluxe expansion focusing on just that), but mono-faction steadfast and loyalty to boost mono-faction decks is also great. This card is both flavorful and a big boost to Shub terror. If nothing else you have a chump for the combat struggle that cost you nothing. Will probably make it into the cube even with his restrictive cost, since in slower games you will often be domain-drained even in later turns (due to a slower start) or want to save a domain for events so a free character is always welcome. His two extra terror struggles is not to be snared at in late-game multiplayer were miskatonic often wins by piling in 5+ cheap investigators to a story. Feed her Young = 9/10 Holy Dark Youngs Batman! Resource-boost, one-cost, card-draw. What’s not to like? Already drained domain and steadfast three? Well, that should just balance it nicely. It still works with dual faction decks as long as Shub is your major faction and in mono-decks it rocks. I don’t know with other players but my main problem with mono-Shub (outside of Ghouls) has been staying in the game when your accelerators get taken out. This allows for steady resource-boosting without card-loss and risk of losing the boost to removal, meaning decks like Mi-Go and Monsters can build a reliable cost-curve without worrying too much about getting shut out of the game when both your accelerators die turn one. Chauncey Swann = 7/10 A relic hunter with synergy towards the factions main goal (bounce)? Nice, sadly I don’t see ST as a support faction, but there are some gems there, making this card playable. It’s high cost (who wouldn’t rather play farrington or descendant at three?), low staying power (STs other characters fair no better though) and the fact that compared to other ST tricks he is actually cheap means he gets quite a decent grade. I still would only play him in certain mono-ST decks and I don’t think he has a place in a cube without a heavy tome-focus. Nathan Wick = 8/10 More synergy with another of STs staples, discard your own cards. This is quite a tricky mechanic to get going without hurting yourself overtly much, but this guy actually contains the possibility of gaining quite the advantage without neccesarily having the right pieces in play. Initiate just begs to be put into play for free and then return to your hand, meaning you can get around the Initiates basic problem of not forwarding the board state in your favor. When rushing characters like Jeffrey and the High wizard also shines for a turn with this card. T’tka Halot = 7/10 Attachments are seldom worth it, even with huge payoffs since it is just too easy for your opponent to two-for-one you with a simple wounding event. This might have something going for it though as it is practically made for boosting a cheap, no-icons character, giving your opponent the choice of killing someone like Wick or a random weenie with this attached. Still not great but at least it isn’t auto-lose and if you do get to activate it also facilitates recursion (which Snow graves as usual shuts down). It gets a high grade simply because the lack of removal and Snow graves in any highlander format, and the fact that it doesn’t rely on other tomes might give it a place in my cube. Jon Pechon = 7/10 Sure he boosts himself, but his skill of 1 makes that point moot with every Cthulhu deck sporting three Y´hantlei statues. Otherwise he could actually be quite worthwhile in a criminal theme deck and supports co-operation with Miskatonic as well by being an investigator. Interesting character that might earn a place in my cube simply due to the fact that there are over 40 criminals in the game, many of which are in the cube. A decent workhorse for three with some interesting synergies beyond the obvious mono-faction route. Go underground = 6/10 Not much to say here, saves sure are nice, but while returning characters with comes into play abilities are great, outside of the cube/highlander format this card really is to slow to help you out since you will have to drain 2 out of 3 domains for a character + save. Can help rush decks but with statue syndicate rush is just dead anyway… Will probably work great in the cube though, so I am happy I don’t play many normal games. Elder Thing Scavenger = 7/10 Expensive, but with a nice twist that can work wonders in multiplayer. I can’t see it being played in a normal game outside of an elder thing theme-deck (which sure would be awesome, and with this being the games seventh elder thing it is just three more elder things away from being very doable in friendly games). Small chance of getting into the cube unless I cut other themes like Gugs, there is only place for so many Elder things, and the others have more direct effects on the game. Walk the Path = 9/10 Boyah! Score! Twin-cast and Forking is the awesome when it comes to dirty tricks and this is a perfect fit for CoC and Yog. I do think it could have been a spell just to annoy the crap out of opponents (with Snow graves recursion is quite unlikely anyway). Will go into my cube for sure, in multiplayer this is gonna be so much fun! Library of Alexandria = 7/10 Sadly for people who play regular games it’s ability is shut off by snow graves, cutting its value significantly. It could fit into highlander and cubes if you can be certain to get a tome or three into your deck. If tomes becomes more prevalent in my cube after this series it could fit in there, since removing or granting arcane struggles can be really powerful vs. certain decks (that do well in multiplayer) that rely on big ancient ones. Hall of champions = 7/10 I love this card! I think the world championship cards needs a new direction, and interacting in a fun and casual way with earlier championship cards is a nice way to do it. I don’t think it will be too relevant in competitive play since you have to play with five championship cards to statistically hit one, and probably 8 or more for it to do it reliably. If Tom keeps winning he will soon have quite a few cards that he has to play in his deck… So that’s my take on this pack. Overall I would give it 8/10, since there is a much higher quality of cards overall than the last series (which still was good) and except for Uroborus I actually liked the direction the game was taking (especially Miskatonics when you draw-mechanic). Hopefully the whole set is just as good and Tomes becomes a staple in my updated cube, while mono-Miskatonic starts taking down Cthulhu and Shub decks at Regionals this season (one can always hope)… …and if it wasn’t clear above I really despise Y’hantlei statue and Snow graves as two of the worst cards in the game due to their ability to overpower certain fun and otherwise worthwhile strategies (weenie and recursion) with little to no cost or thinking on the part of the player. They should be on the restricted list, and that is my two cents.
  6. Nice post, even though I am not playing the game competitively I still like to read articles from people who really like to take an in-depth look at the games underlying structures and current meta-game. Well done and keep them coming I say.
  7. I sometimes use cardgamedb but don't save the decks I create there, since I want to be able to lay the deck out in front of me and play mock matches when I build it so I just use it to try out ideas and see what you can fit in a certain deck. The cube will come, I just have to get the last pack in the cycle in there, make some minor changes (Descendant goes in) and take the time to type it up.
  8. jhaelen: Thankes, I will try to get it up after updating it with the last pack of the current cycle. Since I will let it be and just play with it to try it out until the next cycle is done I should be able to get the cards written down here in the forums. WInchester is a 2-player draft-variant where you each split your cards in two stacks, reveal one card from each stack and then alternate taking one pile out of four and adding a card to each pile after each choice. It makes 2-player drafting quite fun actually. booored: The setup is 500 cards, 50 of each faction and 100 neutrals. No rares or commons since it is a cube (just the most powerful cards with no internatl order whatsoever (which is not nearly as broken in CoC as in Magic). WIth 60 cards per player and 4+ players you will have to go 2-faction (one player went with cthulhu and neutrals which was not nearly as good as cthulhu + another faction would have been) if you use all the cards you drafted from those factions and most of your neutrals. That will not make for an optimal deck, if you only want to use cards that are tournament worthy you will have to go with three factions. It worked really well with four players and 60 cards each. Hatedrafting is easy, and you will not really know what your factions will be during the first pack since 8 factions makes it very hard to know what got picked out (there is a good chance that there never was a certain faction in a pack for example). Anyone who sees the Khopesh will get it, even if you have no cthulhu at all in your deck, so even if you get sent a lot of cthulhu you can't count on getting all those cards. So it is quite a challenge to draft a good deck, even though I think we weren't the best drafters when we tried it out. It produced fun choices and decks though, and that's the point of the cube.
  9. I wouldn't mind going from (northern) Sweden to Helsinki to play in a Cthulhu tournament since I haven't heard of one north of Stahleck. I have heard some good stuff about Ropecon as well so even if it wasn't a big event it could be fun.
  10. http://dosexplora.free.fr/telecharger/rules_multiplayers_cenacle.pdf Here are the rules in english, after playing quite a lot of multiplayer myself I can only say that these rules rock compared to the normal multiplayer games that just drag on forever and ever. Sharing a story with each opponent (in slightly different ways with 3 or 4 players) means that the stand-offs that normally occur in multiplayer are basically unheard of. In four-way multiplayers, conspiracies also really come into their own when you place on top of existing stories. The dirty tricks producable this way are just so darn fun (think you're winning? Lets see what you say about 10 success tokens to win that final story!). So check it out, with some nice highlander decks the 4-player cenacle rules are my favorite flavor of cthulhu lcg.
  11. Probably not worth that much now that very few people are playing the game. Most people who do would surely give you around 80 bucks or so for it, I know I would as well.
  12. I was reading Chris Longs excellent collection of articles from the old CCG at his site and started to think about the role conspiracies play in the LCG compared to the CCG when I read an article about the original release of the Conspiracies of Chaos Asylum Pack at the end of the CCG where the developers clarified how they worked in a short preview. Apparently conspiracies in the CCG clarified conspiracies as belonging to the player who actually played them onto the table (only the player who played a conspiracy could activate its effect if won) while the LCG has taken the stand to not do this and just treat them as regular stories that effect everyone equally unless stated otherwise (from what has been written mostly just because of badly written rules that make it seem like this was how conspiracies should work). This made me a sad panda, why create some really interesting conspiracies that gives more ways of interacting with the basic mechanics of the game and then dilute the effort by not giving any reward whatsoever to players who give slots in their decks to those conspiracies. Sadly, this makes many conspiracies that boost your own characters much less interesting picks for a deck, which of course is bad for the game. Lately I have begun to play them by the old CCG rules in my centacle-multiplayer games (which also has special rules for placing conspiracies over existing stories to keep the number of stories at a manageable level, which makes them even more interesting) and they have really made an impact on the game. After reading up on the rulebook online at this site I found another really strange thing about conspiracies, you can have FOUR of each conspiracy in your deck instead of three. I presume this is just a typo of some kind (since you could have 4 of each card in the CCG it would make sense that during playtest this would at one time or another have been true for the LCG as well), especially since the rules for deckbuilding states that you can only have three of any card in your deck (not mentioning any special rules for conspiracies, those are printed earlier in the rulebook under the conspiracies heading). Since I don't have my rulebook with me I can't check if the rulebook online is just an earlier version but I can only presume that the one FFG puts up on their website is up to date. Contradictory rules also makes me a sad panda.
  13. dboeren: I just read your articles on bbg, very informative and nice. Always fun to get the chance to poke around in someone elses mind when they are doing deckbuilding decisions. As for my decks, if it is of interest to people here I could write them down, but since it is quite dreary to write down 200 unique card names I didn't feel the need to do so if it isn't something people really want to see.
  14. 1) How many ready-to-play decks do you maintain at any given time? Four. It used to be four competitive dual-faction decks, but I recently changed it into four highlander dual-faction decks for beginners. 2) Do you take your decks apart to assemble other decks, or do you keep them around once you've built them? I keep them around and only take them apart when I rebuild all my decks. 3) Are you constantly tweaking your decks with new cards, or do you leave them alone? I usually tweak after every new AP, but now that I have a cube with 500 cards to update as well I will only be doing after a complete cycle is done. 4) Do you record your deck lists (on a spreadsheet or online) so you can recreate them later? I used to record them in a book, but with changing them after every AP it got a bit too much. 5) Do you avoid using the same cards in different decks, or do you have favorites that you like to use all the time? I play a lot of highlander to avoid the problem of only seeing a few really good cards. Still I have favorites that see a lot of use. 6) Do you sleeve your cards? If so, do you match the sleeve color to the deck's predominate faction, or do you use FFG's Cthulhu art sleeves? My preconstructed decks all have FFGs cthulhu art-sleeves, one art for mythos decks and one art for investigator decks. My cube have green high quality sleeves (the colour of cthulhu himself), while my story cards and domain cards have the same art as the mythos decks. I do have a question 7) When you mix up you regular games with something extra spicy, what do you play? Highlander, four-faction or just multiplayer with regular decks?
  15. When I first started playing the game the very first thing I got was three core sets. Then I built 7 single faction decks and learned the game from playing them against one another. As I got more and more of the cards the decks evolved until I tired of making mono-faction-decks and started to make competitive dual-faction decks. Then, when I discovered the Centacle-rules that actually made multiplayer fun I had so many cards that I could make Highlander decks for each faction that were actually quite good (and very fun, since it was always a surprise when you drew your starting hand). When I got tired of mono-faction highlander decks and trying to make competitive decks that I had no-one to play against (many of my friends like the game, but only play sporadically so giving them an overanalyzed deck just wasn't much fun when a single misplay always cost you the game in 1v1) I built a cube. It takes quite a while to cubedraft though so I wanted four decks to have in the cube-box to just rip out and throw in the lap of any beginner either to play a 1v1 or a centacle multiplayer. I took a cue from the core set here and made two-faction highlander decks, just with no neutrals (because it dilutes the flavor of the faction and are harder to balance between decks) and with the buddy-factions pared of: Miskatonic-Agency, Syndicate-Silver Twilight, Yog-Shubbie (the mythos factions can be discussed if they are flavorably buddy-factions, but with the amount of good hastur-steadfast cthulhu cards it was a no-brainer to build that deck). These decks can easily be built without all the cards in the game available, and after having played with a number of beginners I actually think having two factions makes it a better tool to learn the game. All factions have a weakness or two and it is better to start playing with a deck that compensates for this right away instead of getting a scewed vision of the game (my friends who started cthulhu by just playing centacle multiplayer with highlander decks actually whined quite a lot about how overpowered Miskatonic where for a while, since the lack of removal and importance of skill + investigate in multiplayer makes one of the weakest factions into one of the stronger ones in these kind of games). What you get is decks that do more than a single trick (beginning players will get kind of sad if they want to play Miskatonic in a 1v1 vs Cthulhu and constantly get hit with sacrificial offerings into dreamlands messenger or kopesh with no ability whatsoever to return the favor) and actually plays the game instead of abusing a single part of it as most mono-decks do. Sure it is very effective to make a cthulhu deck that shows how good removal is, but it won't get many players hyped up to play more after seeing their Miskatonic deck getting trashed. Miskatonic-Agency: Investigation and story manipulation from Miskatonic while Agency bring combat strength and wounding. Miskatonics arcane makes Agency easier to play with for beginners while Agencies ability to remove threats makes Miskatonic harder to deal with for opposing decks. Syndicate-SIlver Twilight: Both factions do dirty tricks, but while Syndicate do it straight up and cheap (exhausting, skill manipulation) silver twilight does it with more bang (posing mundande. bouncing, etc.), but for bigger bucks, which makes them a nice pair. Silver Twilights focus on arcane with syndicates combat makes for a similar situatioon to Miskatonic-Agency above. Cthulhu-Hastur: It won worlds, nuff said. Seriously though, cthulhu has power, but lacks in terror. Hastur fixes this and also brings more cheap bodies and struggle surprises (that doesn't straight up wound/destroy). Makes for hell of a tag-team in short. The only thing this deck doesn't do is investigate, which is also why it is playable vs the others. Yog-Shubbie: Might seem like an odd horse at first, but with shubbie being able to ramp up an early defense and yog providing both solid reach with sacrifice events and other similar spells and late game staying power through recursing and some tough critters that fill up some of shubs weaknesses (toughness through polyps, more reach with glaaki and more sacrifice as well just for good measure with many-angled thing) it actually becomes quite a monstrous (pun intended) deck for opponents to deal with if not kept in check. And most importantly, yog has some investigate, after investigator decks takes a quick story, a mythos player will quickly get the importance of this.
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