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Tarkand

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  1. I didn't think about making it a Tzeentch thing to be honest... Slaanesh was just the first thing that came to mind. The idea being that 'freedom' is a getaway to hedonism and self-gratification... if you're free, you can do what you want, so do what you like. Take it to the excess. There's also the alluring charm of freedom to people who are essentially indentured servants from birth to death. Than again... there's definitly something to be said about the goal of the cult, to change the system, the very way the world work... so change is definitely key. I don't know, I'm afraid this may fall to close to the 'Everything is about change when it really comes down to it' that follows Tzeentch around (Blood and Slaughter? Well, that's a change from health and alive. Decay and Entropy? It's a change from growth and healthyness... ans so forth). I'll consider it tho, could make for interesting cultists down the road, as the whole slaanesh cultist is a bit played out.
  2. I'm preparing my first Dark Heresy game, and I figured I'd use the forum as a sounding board. Basically, I'll write most of my 'game note' here and if you guys feel like reading and adding stuff (basically, as the title implies, help me brainstorm), you're more than welcome. I did this when I ran my Deathwatch game, and it ended giving me many great ideas, so hopefully it works well here too Cult of Freedom Lord Kharsi used to be human. But that was long ago. He made pacts with the ruinous powers for immortality. In exchange, he serves the Dark Prince of desire as a willing pawn. Kharsi believes that deep within every human there is a desire for freedom and that freedom eventually leads to excess. He has read extensively on the ages of old, even time before the golden age of humanity and firmly believes that if you give the people freedom, they will doom themselves. As such, he has been planting the seed of freedom on several imperial worlds. His cults work insidious and slowly, changing the morale and opinion of the little folks and working class, from hive ganger to manufactorum worker – this process is slow and can take centuries. They bring ideas that are heresy to the Imperial Creed – personal freedom, democracy and equal rights.They at first masquarade as part of the Imperial Creed... but once they become entrenched and present enough that subterfuge become less necessary, they quickly drop the pretense. The people first approached by this are the low class and the idea presented forth are sweet indeed to them. Many join the cults and start working toward the common goal of overthrowing their planetary government, some even dreaming in their madness of taken their ideals to Holy Terra herself. As the cult progress into their madness, they break the imperial creed in many ways and eventually start to debase themselves with vile debauchery – for who is to tell a free man what he cannot do? The higher echelon of the cults is eventually initiated to the secret of the Dark Prince and everything that their cult do is in his name and in the name of their spiritual leader, Kharsi. The cults have rarely been successful in completing their ultimate goal. They always stir trouble to various degrees and remain around the planet for hundreds of years, converting and subverting, but usually when the more aggressive part of a takeover process is called for, they get crushed by the might of the Imperium in one way or another. In one case however, the cult became so entrenched and vast that it totally paralyzed the planet in internal strife… until some cultist managed to get in contact with traitor marines, who saw the world as ripe for plunder. The world burned and Kharsi smiled. As of now, the Inquisition is not aware that those ‘freedom based Slanesh Cults’ are all part of the hydra that is Kharsi. Parabell, a Hive World, is faced with the threat of subversion from one of Kharsi’s cult. Inquisitor Drogon had already sent a lone agent to investigate… however, he has gone missing (presumed dead) in a riot. This has the Inquisitor on edge, but he has more pressing matter to attend to and while it seems too much of a coincidence to lose an agent in a ‘riot’, he has no real proof that chaotic event caused the disappearance… he doesn’t know for sure if this a job for the Inquisition of for the Arbitres yet. He now send a team of investigator (the pc) to get to the bottom of things. Note: Kharsi will most likely become a recurring villain. I haven’t decided if he will make an appearance or only be hinted at. The 'chronicle's' main objective will be to find the missing Inquisitorial Agent as well as dismantle the Cult’s hold on the Hive World. Kharsi’s idea of freedom and democracy are obviously something that will resonate with most of my players (In fact, if it weren’t for the whole slanesh thing, you could easily think of him as the good guy and the Imperium as the evil empire) and that’s the idea – a few of my players have a bit of a hard time with how oppressive and dark age-like the Imperium is, this is me messing with them. The inspiration for this is largely from the Caiphas Cain novel where he has to deal with Tau presence on Gravalax... The Tau stayed on an Imperial planet for hundred of years and slowly imperial citizen came to see them as neighbor and even friend... and eventually as a better alternative to the Imperium. Even the architecture of new building started to be Tau inspired. In a way, this is how the Cult of Freedom operate... but with a much darker motive.
  3. Face Eater said: Tarkand said: Well, you're nitpicking here Face Eater. Yes, yes I am, thank you for noticing. Don't think you charm me that easily though. Tarkand said: Even if they don't 'technically' outrank them, even a fleet officer will have serious reservation about not doing what a Deathwatch Kill-Team suggest he does. Those guys work for one of the most (if not the most) powerful organisation in the Imperium and are themselves pretty **** important (angel of death, elite of the empire, culture icon, etc) and it's not like Space Marines are known for asking for assistance, so when they do, it's usually because they need it with a capital N. Not to mention that if he refuse to complies, it won't look good for him when the Kill Team's report read 'The planet was saved but sadly, because Imperial Force garrisoned on the premise refused to cooperate, half the population died.' or something similar. In short, weither it's because of chain of command, respect, reputation or fear... Space Marines should be pretty good at getting Imperial Forces to do what they need them to do. There is a thread in the DW Gamemaster forum that speaks of Inquisitor throwing their weight around... well, in many way, a Space Marine - especially one with very close ties to the Inquisition - can also throw his weight around. It's one thing to deal with players that are physically powerful - a lot of games have 'over powered' protagonist. It's another to deal with the ressource and backing Space Marine can bring forth. They are really bigging up the DW if anyone's claiming them to be the most powerful organisations in the Imperium. Well yes and no. You see much of this also applies to Inquisition, the difference being that Inquisition are feared by every Imperial citizen throughout the galaxy where as the DW are super secret. Obviously some people know, like many secrets, it's not clarified whose supposed to know but clearly some level is. Arguably, the asset requisition system represents following the chain of command, but can you guarantee that someone in this particular battle know's who DW is? Respect, reputation? Sure, for Ultramarines, Flesh Eaters and Dark Angels not so much. Fear? Works face to face very well, not so well over the vox when there's a commisar next to you that's adamant that you are going to follow the existing orders. As much as anything these are roll play issues if you are doing in the game, but that's not to say requisition is a carte blanche. Well, just to clarify Eather, when I said 'one that work for one of the most powerful group in the Imperium' - I meant the Inquisition, not so much the Deathwatch. In short, if a Ultramarine Sergeant request for assistance and says he's following direct order from an Inquisitor... well, it's getting hard to say no to that one, doubly so if you know the Inquisitor in question. Now of course, if it's a Fellowship 15 Flesh Tearer, it's a different story. And this become a **** near non-factor when the conversation happens in person... many of the 'lower ranked' Imperial officers (Sergeant, Platoon Command, Frigate Capitain, etc) have probably never seen a Space Marine in the flesh and may just be awed into doing whatever, doubly so since those specific marines have Inquisition logo engraved all over the place... Trying to convince someone face-to-face only becomes a problem when talking about the top brass here (Lord Commander, Fleet Admiral, etc). Like you said, it is a roleplaying factor (and it might require some roll - that Ultramarine solo ability can really shine here), but realistically speaking, the Kill-Team should stand a decent chance of getting most Imperial Forces to comply with them, unless you're just being a hard ass as a DM.
  4. Face Eater said: Tarkand said: Perfectly right. A few years back GW released a 'Movie Marine Codex', the idea being that you could play the Marine you read about in the books, comics and what not. WS/BS/S/T6 2W, LD10, +2 Sv 5+Inv... oh, and Bolter were STR6, AP4 Rending and so forth. So yeah namesrever, GW is also aware that TT =/= fluff... Again, can I point out that Movie Marines was taken so seriously as to literally include rules for stunt doubles so... maybe a little tongue in cheek. The point here is that GW is aware that there is a disrepency between 'Table Top Stats' and 'Lore Stats'... not how valid the ruleset for movie marine was
  5. herichimo said: namesrever said: Game stats take precedence. And what the tabletop game says and what the Deathwatch game says are that Space marines are exceptional but hardly godlike. A Space Marine is stronger and tougher than a normal man - but not nearly to the level of some Psykers, Inquisitors, or even "normal" Imperial generals or SoB leaders. Aside from which, if you are going by novels... well, you can pick and choose your sources to get any answer you like. Game stats take precedence. And what the tabletop game says and what the Deathwatch game says are that Space marines are exceptional but hardly godlike. A Space Marine is stronger and tougher than a normal man - but not nearly to the level of some Psykers, Inquisitors, or even "normal" Imperial generals or SoB leaders. Aside from which, if you are going by novels... well, you can pick and choose your sources to get any answer you like. TT stats are highly abstract. They are not representative of the fluff primarily for game balance. If you put half the things a space marine is capable of doing (spitting acid, bullet-proof bones, ceramite armor designed to resist melta and plasma, seeing in the dark, immunity to poison, etc.) then space marines would be monsters. Technically to really match the fluff all space marines should probably have Feel no Pain, Immune to poison, Accute senese, 1 poison attack in CC, and ignore the ap on melta and plasma. Now would you like to go up against a 15 point model with those abilities? Of course not. TT is not fluff. Not even close. As for their superiority, They are. Space Marines are not human, they once were, but they are not anymore. They are stronger and tougher by orders of magnatude, they are smarter, faster, more agile over mere mortal humans. They have (expert) training in all aspects of warfare. They are the jacks of all trades and they've mastered them all. I know you're probably one of the "I hate space marine" crowd but they really are as powerful as they are claimed. An assassin beating these guys up? Are you crazy. Of all the assassin is, it is still human. It has been established in so many stories no matter how hard you try a human can NEVER get anywhere close to what a space marine is irrespective of any kind of augmentation. You think your vindicare has some kind of advantage over a space marine who has been a scout for longer than the Vindicare has been alive, seen hundreds of more battles while a scout and has thousands of hours more training in the same skills in infinately more hostile environments compared to the Vindicare? (same can be said for other assassins) Are you crazy? I could go on for hours, but I won't. Perfectly right. A few years back GW released a 'Movie Marine Codex', the idea being that you could play the Marine you read about in the books, comics and what not. WS/BS/S/T6 2W, LD10, +2 Sv 5+Inv... oh, and Bolter were STR6, AP4 Rending and so forth. So yeah namesrever, GW is also aware that TT =/= fluff. That being said... Temple Assassin (I'm not sure if this is what DH character actually become... doesn't make much sense as Temple Assassin are born and bred into the role, you don't just join a Temple when you're 'rank 8') receive just as much - if not more so - gene enhancement as a Space Marine and one of those guys is more than a match for SM in combat. The 'problem' with Temple Assassins is that they are even rarer and more expansive than Space Marines to create. The other problem is that a Space comparing a Space Marine's strength as an individual vs another individual totally miss the point - Marines are rarely if ever alone.
  6. namesrever said: You're comparing Apples to Oranges, and declaring that Apples are better 'cuz you like the taste. Just FYI: www.sinfest.net/archive_page.php
  7. I maybe an exception, but I for one liked that the book was filled with all those iconic enemy that had been missing from previous 40k rpg books. But than again, my favorite enemy to put against my players is Chaos... so having a bunch of random no-name Xeno would have been a bit meh for me.
  8. Face Eater said: It's not so much that they outrank other military they come across though. The Deathwatch rules are quite clear that they exist outside of the rest of military structure and are only included as allies. Even so far as the Ordo Xeno's goes they are only allies apparently (although how that get's them an =I= in their 'chapter' badge is beyond me). So it's only really the respect for them that gets them outside assistance, especially as often the assistance has to ignore their current orders or confirm with their superiors. The Assets system assumes that everybody does what they want (or can afford), considering the hoops even an Inquisitor has to jump through to get the same results. Of course this isn't same type of game as a DH and players don't want to go through the rigmarole. Well, you're nitpicking here Face Eater. Even if they don't 'technically' outrank them, even a fleet officer will have serious reservation about not doing what a Deathwatch Kill-Team suggest he does. Those guys work for one of the most (if not the most) powerful organisation in the Imperium and are themselves pretty **** important (angel of death, elite of the empire, culture icon, etc) and it's not like Space Marines are known for asking for assistance, so when they do, it's usually because they need it with a capital N. Not to mention that if he refuse to complies, it won't look good for him when the Kill Team's report read 'The planet was saved but sadly, because Imperial Force garrisoned on the premise refused to cooperate, half the population died.' or something similar. In short, weither it's because of chain of command, respect, reputation or fear... Space Marines should be pretty good at getting Imperial Forces to do what they need them to do. There is a thread in the DW Gamemaster forum that speaks of Inquisitor throwing their weight around... well, in many way, a Space Marine - especially one with very close ties to the Inquisition - can also throw his weight around. It's one thing to deal with players that are physically powerful - a lot of games have 'over powered' protagonist. It's another to deal with the ressource and backing Space Marine can bring forth.
  9. DW is hard game to gauge already because most of us are not used to run games where the characters are high ranked military officers. Yes, even a 'grunt' Space Marine more or less outrank most military personel he'll come across and even if he encounters somebody higher ranked than him, he may very well be able to get him to act on his behalf simply based on his reputation as an Angel of Death of the Emperor (doubly so if Ultramarine). To give you an example... I ran a game once where I mentionned to my players that the Frigate that drove them to the planet stayed in orbit around the planet. It was to pick them up after the mission. This was before RoB btw. The players outsmarted me really, as one of them picked up a Vox Caster so he could talk to the ship... Never occured to me that they would do that, to me, the ship was just there as their taxi and was to be conveniently forgotten once they arrived, I didn't think I'd have to bother myself with it once they left it until they used the locator beacon to call a shuttle. So yeah... Instead of exploring stuff, they basically had the much more powerful ship auspex scanner detect stuff. Then they asked for a 'bird eye view' map of the terrain they were about to traverse. It's a good thing they had to retrieve stuff from the enemy hideout, because it had been a search and destroy mission, they might have just called for a lance strike on the hideout... and what Imperial Navy Captain - who just ferried this Kill-Team on a very highly classified Inquisitorial Mission - is going to say no to a Kill-Team when asked to strike a Tyranid spawning pool from orbit? Getting the captain to comply would have been an even bigger joke if it had been a DW vessel to begin with. I took with a smile and let them get away with it. Didn't feel like coming up for an half-assed excuse everytime they asked for help from the ship. Learning experience, now I either don't put any ship nearby and build my story around the idea that the ship is there and my players will call upon it. In a way, it kinda feels to me like the assets in RoB are there for the DM to say 'Well, you COULD call for an Orbital Strike... but you didn't spend any requisition on it, so it won't work'.
  10. Zappiel said: 'how so?'.....well, the suggestion that a game is good for offense but falls apart on the defense is one which posits inherent game flaw, and is by definition an 'attack' on that system. Again, nothin wrong with slaggin the system (it deserves some slagging); just, you said that wasn't yer purpose... Well, if any critic is considered 'slagging', than we don't have the same definition for the word (I don't see how I'm obfuscating/embelishing the truth to make my point more valid) and yes, in that case, I'm slagging it. Zappiel said: Interesting that you mention first ed. Shadowrun...you must have enjoyed it immensely to mention it here so long after its heyday...i'm trying to recall how we handled the death in that game...I think we mostly just made new characters...only the various street samurai managed to hold out for any period of time (and one very lucky combat mage). (oh, and a merc I had once; but he had a big gun). Yeah, our basic survival strategy in Shadowrun was about the same as in DeathWatch: don't get hit. Though I think someone's already mentioned the judicious use of heavy cover. Yes, I did like Shadowrun and that's why I'm saying there's isn't necessarily something wrong with a game that greatly emphasis offense over defense, but In this case it become a problem of 'setting' so to speak. Shadowrun is a gritty game, but despite having magic and elves and dragons, it prides itself on being 'realistic' and very brutal. Armors were hard to come by, and even when available, were often not worth it (i.e. Movement penalty and nothing yell 'I want to get in trouble!' like a full body riot armor) and even a simple handgun could easily kill if memory serves. But it was okay, because it fit the setting, it fits the idea that life is cheap in the streets and despite all the cyberware you may put in, you are still a fleshy human and they are much bigger things out there with much bigger guns than you. That if you fail and die, a thousand other punks hungry for credit chits are lining up to take the job. It was a game were victory was usually assured by a knife in the back, a plastic charge under a car or a sniper shot from half a mile away and going in blazing with both guns was usually the prerogative of the stupid or the desperate. In SR, death is cheap, fast and quite often meaningless. In DW, some of the most powerful tech available to mankind is standard issue to you. You are impervious to most thing that would kill a normal man. You matter, you are one of the Emperor's Elite. At any given time, you are usually the biggest and baddest thing on the battlefield, and if you aren't, well, there's 5 more of you in your team! Valor, honor, courage and direct confrontation are not only expected of you, but are usually the fastest way to advance in the ranks (I'm not talking charging headlong like a moron here, but setting up 'car bombs' or snipping people from 2 kilometers away should not be the defacto solution for a Kill-Team - you can send other, much 'cheaper' people to do that. If you're sending SM, it's usually because you need the physicality they bring). In DW, your death should mean something and will more often than not come about because you sacrificed yourself. Basically, Deathwatch is everything Shadowrun isn't. Brand said: One problem with the one-hit-one-kill scenario that comes up often in fights is the fact that Sound Constitution is really a worthless waste of XP. To use the old D&D comparison (which itself isn't very balanced), a Level 8 character will have about 8 times as many HP as a Level 1 character of the same class. Your average Rank 8 Space Marine won't have much, if any, more health than when he was at Rank 1, yet he's carrying much bigger weapons and fighting much deadlier foes. I've already house-ruled Sound Constitution to provide 3 extra Wounds instead of 1, but even then it's not as attractive a Talent to my players as many others. Very good point, didn't think about that. There's also very few real way to increase your armor per say... Artificier Armor is locked away behind Rank/XP requirement and Terminator armor not only require sizable requisition, but also the proper training/awards (And beside, after a certain point, even the 4-8 extra armor of those barely even matter). I suppose there's the various forcefields, but by their very nature, they don't really help the unpredictable 'all or nothing' aspect of combat.
  11. Zappiel said: So I suppose the question I need clarified is this: what do you mean by 'balance'? A less steep curve in level of power? As I said before, the game feels right at Rank 1 - at that level, players can miss more and don't one shot kill most opponents. This create much more dramatic encounter without resorting to the Wound padded elite. As you get to Renown Rank 3, things just go totally crazy. A progression in power is expected and encouraged in pretty much every game of course, but it's way to sharp in DW in my opinion. Zappiel said: And, again, you claim to not slag the system, but: "an extremely brutal system where offence totally eclipse defence" sounds like a slag to me. How so? Aside from the fact that I dislike it, what is inherently wrong with such a system? Beside, I am lying or something? If hitting people with 1d10+35 (or much more) Pen 9 when they have a T bonus of 8 and Armor of 8 not a very brutal system where offense totally eclipse defense... then what is? And it's not like I'm describing some oddball impossible mega-power combo here, this is pretty much a standard attack from a Renown Rank 3 character versus a standard elite monster. I've played early edition Shadowrun and they too had the whole 'You get shot, you die. Hard' and that didn't make it a bad game. This doesn't make it a bad game either. It just makes it less to my liking than it could be. Zappiel said: Are you looking for solutions to these problems, or are you just wanting a place to vent? Cause i'll give you all the room you need if that's all you're here for...but if you want answers, then posit some sort of answerable question. But, remember, since you find the system lacking, any solutions are going to require, by definition, your own sweat and effort to modify and correct. No magical sugarplum fairy is going to magically make all your concerns vanish in a poof! The game designers are done their work...time for us to take over. And, no, I don't have fun trying to help people who don't know what they want. Help me help you, and stop being a jerk to the folks who are trying to work with you to squeeze more enjoyment out of your game. I've already said: I simply have different taste and I'll need to adapt, change the system or move on. I am hoping that a future version of DW will have a different ruleset making things less all or nothing/unstable. I am aware that in order to fix the current system, I need to do it by myself. I am aware that while I consider it a problem, others may very well like it and this may indeed, be the final intent of FFG. And thanks to this thread, I am also aware that I'm not the only one with this opinion. Here's to hoping that FFG notices that. At this point the discussion is winding down and is probably about to die off. I certainly don't have much more to say on the topic. This all stuff you'd be aware of if you'd bothered to read any of the thread (This is the second time in this thread that while talking to you, I need to re-quote myself.) instead of feeling you have some obligation of berating me because I over-reacted to a perceived insult. Yeah, I get it. I'm a meanie head. Get over it.
  12. That's the point I'm trying to make here - many of the assets are so big that they are essentially plot device. Giving the players a beacon to call an Orbital Strike down on a target is essentially how you end your game for that evening. This is not something they should be spending point on. Same thing for transports or armed support, or whatever - for the main part, assets are story driven thing. If the players are required to cover over 2,000 miles of terrain during a mission... you can bet your ass command will assign them a Rhino or a Land Speeder Storm or something. They won't drop them on a planet and be like 'Well, cya you guys in 6 months, sucks none of you splurged for a transport, but what can you do!' The players shouldn't have to pay for stuff they need to complete the mission. On the other hand of the equation - if they pay for a Rhino or an Orbital Strike, a Deep Strike Terminator squad, or what have you - than it means it isn't part of the story. You couldn't know ahead of time they were going to take those instead of an extra gun or a power fist. And then it's just bad form to tell your players 'Well, you can take it, but you can only use it when I tell you so'. If your game cannot handle the disruption that assets will cause (And I don't blame you, my games couldn't really either and I'm lucky my players never bothered to take them) than you might as well prevent them from being taken so your players don't end up feeling screwd. If your game involved walking through dense terrain and avoiding ambushes and traps and possibly having to enter communication with the local to find the location of a hidden temple... and the players spend requisition on a Land Speeder and just fly over the canopy and find the temple and land there, they basically just destroyed your game - and they might feel clever about it, but once they realize they cut down the game from 4 session to 1, they won't feel so happy about it... so what do you do? Let them get a Speeder but have it not work? Better to tell them you don't want no freaking speeder on this one. Just come up with some somewhat logical excuse as to why the Speeder aren't available for that mission and you're set.
  13. In case you hadn't noticed Zappiel, there is a conversation going on here and you're not adding anything to it, you're just being a smart ass. But I guess as long as you're having fun. ak-73 said: Andf you're not willing to aim for a mix, you'll have to live with a KT being an army unto themselves mid-game and further. It basically come back to what I said earlier - it put the job of balancing the system on the DM, which arguably, should be on the game designer. The fact that a typical DW 'monster' entries are pretty complex - they have tons of skills and talents, and you'll often need to flip back and forth in the mainbook to get a good grasp for what the enemy can do - make me believe that they probably didn't intend for the game to be 'rocket tag'. There is certainly a bit of a dichotomy between the fluff of the game/setting and the way things play out in the RPG. And from what I gathered on this thread, I'm certainly not the only one raising an eyebrow at some of the stuff in the system either. But then again, I don't know how much playtesting FFG does, neither do I know what they actually wanted to do with this game system - maybe this is what they wanted. An extremely brutal system where offense totally eclipse defense. Maybe the game designer enjoy system where getting hit once mean instant death for most combatants. And if that's the case, if it was done on purpose, than I simply have different taste and I'll need to adapt, change the system or move on. ItsUncertainWho said: It's a matter of understanding and acknowledging that Space Marines are a level of magnitude greater than a normal human, no matter how exceptional that normal human may be. They are supposed to be able to do what a normal man cannot. That discrepancy, no matter how many people want "balance" can't exist if you want Space Marines to be what the fluff tells us they are. A "balanced" marine would be nothing more than a big dude in power armor and he would be very boring. That is the fear I have about Black Crusade, that they have balanced so much that everyone is too similar and CSM's are going to be nothing more than the big dude in power armor due to balancing them against a normal human. I agree a 100%. I have the same concern about Black Crusade, and the mini-adventure they published didn't really put me at ease. The adventure tackled the issue by giving enemies a 'better' attack against a Chaos Space Marine or having npc require 'more' of the CSM (i.e. Kill 2 servitor in a duel instead of 1). That being said, from the preview, CSM do seem to be just as bad ass as their loyalist counterpart and it's going to be quite a challenge for would be DM of Black Crusade to run their games... especially since Chaos Followers don't really have that much of a reason not to turn against each other whenever they see it as advantageous. I don't personally run crossovers games. But considering how '1 shot-1 kill' Deathwatch gets, it would seems a bit suicidal to add players from the other game systems in there... they'd essentially have to duck and hide as soon as the fighting got started, for fear of dying from a stray bullet. The characters are on such different scale after all, and as other have said, it's quite possible that the WHFRPG system which DW is built on simplies break down at a certain power level.
  14. If a player spend 80 requisition point to have access to a Orbital Lance Strike and you are denying him the use of it until the very moment where it fit with your story... than he's going to wonder why he spend 80 points for a plot device. You might as well remove the ability to buy those assets and simply use them as such - plot device. Not saying it's a bad thing, but it'd be just as bad as letting someone buy a Relic Sword and have it 'malfunction' the entire game except for 1 battle where you want them to use it...
  15. I don't think the system is the problem... but the power gap between Renown 1-2 and Renown 3+ weapon is simply too wide. Going from a Chain Sword to a Power Sword is nowhere near the upgrade of going from a Power Sword to a Power Fist/Lightning Claw. As such, they cannot increase SM's toughness/armor to a point where they are untouchable by RT/DH character, despite the fact that it's possible to deal 1d10+42 (or more really) damage with a Lightning Claw... which pretty much 1 shot any non-Master level opponents. Than again, if you make it so the guy can survive hits from Lightning Claws, you make him impervious to any lesser melee weapon (and most firearm) as well. This is an even bigger problem when you try to mix and match the other system with this... I'm not familiar with Ascension level character, but I know that Rogue Trader character would be dead 3 time over from such a blow. From what I heard, the 3 system don't really crossover that well anyway, they should probably just do away with the idea.
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