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Acreyan

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  1. Antistone said: Dividing max health by average net damage doesn't give you an accurate answer, because it doesn't penalize for damage wasted on overkill (a 90% miss chance and a 10% chance to hit for 10 times the monster's max life does not mean that you kill it in an average of 1 attack). And subtracting average defense from average damage rolled doesn't even give you the true average net damage dealt, for the same reason (sometimes defense exceeds rolled damage, in which case the extra defense is wasted). Here's the algorithm I'm using (note: numbers are rounded for purposes of examples): List every possible combination of die rolls, and the probability of each. For example "the blue die rolls 2 wounds and 3 range, the red die rolls 3 wounds and a surge, and the gray die rolls 1 shield" would be one possible combination, with a probability of (1/6)*(1/6)*(3/6) = 1/72 Determine the amount of damage that will be done if that particular combination of results is rolled (in this example, 5 wounds after spending the surge and subtracting defense, but we cap that at the monster's maximum health, if lower) Use these results to build a table showing every total amount of damage it is possible to do with a single attack, and the probability of doing that amount of damage (e.g. 20% chance of a miss or zero net damage, 9% chance of 1 damage, 17% chance of 2 damage, 54% chance of one-shotting the cave spider) - basically, combine all the die rolls that produce the same net result, adding up their probabilities to get the total probability of that result From that, you can calculate the average number of attacks it would take to kill the spider if it only had one health remaining, ignoring attacks with no effect (so…1 attack) Using that, you can calculate the average number of attacks it would take to kill the spider if it had two health remaining, still ignoring attacks with no effect (.09 / 0.8 = 11% of hits deal 1 damage, which means that it dies in 1 + (the one-health number) attacks, while (.17 + .54) / .8 = 89% of hits kill it outright (1 attack), for a weighted average of 1.11 attacks) Using that, calculate the average number of attacks if it had three health remaining (11% deal 1 damage, killing it in 1+1.11 attacks; .17 / .8 = 21% deal 2 damage, killing it in 1+1 attacks; .54 / .8 = 68% kill it in 1, for a weighted average of 1.33 attacks) And so on, up to the monster's maximum health But that was ignoring the attacks with no effect - actually, 20% of our attacks are completely wasted. So now we need to divide by the fraction of effective attacks (80%), which gives us 1.33 / .8 = 1.67 attacks average for the entire process As you can probably tell, that's a LOT of math, which is why I have a computer program do it. But the number you get is not an estimate or an extrapolation, it's the actual exact average number of attacks (within the limits of floating point precision, and assuming there are no mistakes in my input data…) Thank you. I've been going through this thread waiting for someone to actually address probability instead of averages.
  2. Thanks, guys. That seems "broken" so I wanted to make sure I was reading it correctly.
  3. After reading the rules for large monsters, this strikes me as a little off. It seems as I read it, that the overlord counts out movement spaces from a given point on the base, and then may place the monster so that any point on the base occupies that square. Am I reading this correctly? In our games, our OL has played this to his advantage, essentially moving two more squares than they have movement points. He counts from a front square on the base, and then places a rear square on the base in the target square. This seems legitimate with the rule reads. Thoughts?
  4. Thanks, Shnar, two of us in my group missed that!
  5. My card says "extra power die", but treating it as an upgrade to the dice, like the Power Potions makes sense. That's not that worthwhile at higher levels, though. I'm surprised stuff like this doesn't come up in playtesting...
  6. When an OL plays DOOM! at an advanced (Silver or Gold) level, does he get a power die of the campaign level, or a power die of the creature type level? For example, we have a gold level beast in a silver level campaign; which type of die does the OL get when DOOM! is played? Black, silver, or gold? Thanks for the feedback!
  7. Two copper pieces: My group is treating conditional armors as the lowest value: for example, zero for 0/3 or 0/5.
  8. First, thank you to FFG for the Lieutenant Miniatures; our group enjoys having the models available so the Overlord's minions look cooler than ours thanks to my paint job. Second, I just wanted to throw out the idea of Avatar minis in painted plastic or again in pewter like the lieutenants. Keep up the good work on Descent!
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