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Lula2

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    Lula Vampiro
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  1. Thanks for the detailed reply! So Pressed-Crew Quarters + Temple-Shrine to the God Emperor + Ancient Life Sustainer make sense to me, just as you said … Pressed-Crew Quarters: "Decrease Morale permanently by 2" Temple-Shrine to the God Emperor: "Increase Morale permanently by 3" Ancient Life Sustainer: "Increase Morale permanently by 2" … but what if I have a Death Cult on board, and a Crew Reclamation Facility? Death Cult: "However, reduce all Morale loss from any source by 2, due to the crew's unwavering faith." Crew Reclamation Facility: "Increase all losses to Morale by 1." Do those instructions apply to the loss of morale from Pressed-Crew Quarters? or only to morale losses during the game, like when the bad guys hit our ship?
  2. Do I need a separate proficiency to use a weapon's secondary attack, or do I only need proficiency in the main weapon? For example, if I have a kombi-shoota which is a shoota with a one-shot rokkit launcha, can I fire the rokkit launcha without penalty if I only have proficiency in shootas, not rokkit launchas? Does burna proficiency cover the secondary usage as a burning blade? Does shotgun proficiency cover the shotgun's melee attachment? etc.
  3. In the Gretchin stat block on Into the Storm p. 64, I notice that they haven't got a Speak Language skill. Nathan Dowdell has stated elsewhere that he recommends adding one talent or skill to each Grot to make him actually useful. Do I have to choose between giving my sidekick Medicae and being able to talk with him?
  4. I've been having some trouble figuring out what our ships' actual morale and population values are. The various components we have do some combination of the following: • Increase or decrease Morale/Population • Increase or decrease maximum Morale/Population • Add to or subtract from losses of Morale/Population I'm not sure how to do the arithmetic here. Are increases or decreases in Morale/Population actually different from maximum increases or decreases? Does it matter if something says it increases or decreases morale or population permanently? Do I apply the modifiers from stuff like crew reclamation facilities or death cults to regular increases and decreases, or also maximum increases or decreases?
  5. The consensus in my RT group is that forcing the GM to figure out exactly how many individual purchase attempts of what scale your appallingly wealthy explorer can make every time you go shopping is just cruel; so here are three alternate systems you might use in some combination when you next put into port. I'm curious if anyone else has tried one of these before, and how it went. Shop ‘Til You Drop Each Explorer in the party may continue rolling for Acquisitions as many times as they want—up until they fail a roll, at which point that Explorer must stop. Players cannot spend Fate Points for re-rolls here, but they can spend a single Fate Point to increase Profit Factor by 10% for the duration of their shopping spree, or test Commerce, etc. This process’s in-game duration equals the highest time requirement among the purchased items, plus one day for each item acquired after the first: so if I acquired three items which would normally take one day, 1d10 days, and one week to get, respectively, I take the longest of the three (one week) and add one day for each of the other items, for a total of nine days. I recommend allowing each individual Explorer a run of purchases using these rules, plus a run for the party as a whole for shared items like spaceships or ship parts. This system represents shopping until you run out of money, the local merchants run out of stock, or you risk destabilizing the regional economy and decide to quit before there’s a revolution. Bargain Hunting The Explorer rolls a single Acquisition, no more, without specifying what they want to buy. Fate Points may be spent for +10% or for a re-roll as normal. The Explorer then consults the equipment listings and chooses a single item which they could have acquired through the normal Acquisition rules using that roll. So if I’m in a settlement of ten thousand people, my Profit Factor is 50, and I roll a 40, then I could choose to buy enough Average items (Ordinary +10% in a settlement whose population is between ten and one hundred thousand) to outfit a division of two to five thousand individuals (-20% quantity modifier), because the required modified profit factor (50% base +10% availability/population -20% numbers) is greater than or equal to my roll. Alternatively I could buy a single (-30% quantity) Scarce item (±0% availability/population), etc. Determine time normally for this purchase. This system represents deciding you’re only going to spend a certain amount of money and looking for the best deal available. Caveat Emptor If you fail an Acquisition roll, the GM can offer you the item you wanted, but with strings attached. Maybe it’s a recently stolen item which will draw local law enforcement’s interest. Maybe the vendor wants a special favor done before she agrees to sell. Maybe the item wasn’t quite what you expected: it has a flaw in its construction which gives it an unfavorable quality like Unwieldy, or a hit to its craftsmanship rating. Or maybe, in the case of really big purchases like grand cruisers or corporations or unique treasures, it’ll permanently impact your finances, resulting in a permanent loss of 1d5 Profit Factor. One of the players might also have a fun suggestion for a complication which the GM will like. In any case, the GM will tell you what you’re getting into, and it’s your explorer’s or your party’s decision whether to take it or leave it. This system’s name is Latin High Gothic for “Let the buyer beware,” and is based on what happens when you fail a Resources roll in the Burning Wheel fantasy RPG.
  6. Thanks! My ork is on his way to becoming a Mekboy, so perhaps he'll do it himself at rank four. In the meantime, I've decided that maybe the best way to buy upgrades outright is as the single built-in kustomization you get with a best-craftsmanship ork weapon.
  7. I'm playing an ork freebooter in an upcoming campaign. He specializes in hand-to-hand combat, using firearms mostly to suppress foes. To qualify for the Mekboy alternate rank, he'll need to learn at least two Exotic Weapon Proficiencies. I'd like one of them to be in the burna, since his 15% Ballistic Skill won't harm his ability to set enemies on fire; but what should the other one be in? At Rank 2 he has access to big shoota, burna, and rokkit launcha; but if I take the Manhunter alternate rank at rank 1, he could get exotic weapon proficiency in pretty much anything. What's optimal for him here? Thanks!
  8. I'd like to buy some kustom jobz from Hostile Acquisitions p. 59 for my ork freebooter, but I can't find any listings of their availability. Does anyone know what they are or where I should look? Thanks!
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