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Rovin

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Posts posted by Rovin


  1.  Been gone a couple of weeks from here with a death in the family, and I seem to remember mentioning the Aklo CDs in here before, but in case that memory's false, that stuff is fantastic. 

    www.aklo.net

    I also quite enjoy his sister project Tillinghast Laboratories Incorporated, which I believe is available on the same site.

    The Unquiet Void has two albums worth of ambient sound effects heavy Lovecraft inspired material, Poisoned Dreams and The Shadow-Haunted Outside.

    Those more into straightforward metal - death metal in particular - would likely enjoy the Yyrkoon album Unhealthy Opera. I can't imagine playing to it, but I like the album, and it's all pretty much Lovecraft-based. 


  2. Tibs said:

    Cthulhu's ability is simply that everyone's maximum sanity and stamina are reduced by 1 for the whole game. This means that instead of being 4/6 sanity/stamina, Diana Stanley is 3/5. So she can't go above 3 sanity or 5 stamina in the same way that she can't go above 4/6 in non-Cthulhu games.

    Ah, okay, I was playing that on a round per round basis. Thanks a ton for the help, Tibs.


  3.  Here's a question I've got for ye forumite powers that be...

    We have the ex-cultist girl in our game (I want to say her name's Diana, but I'm not totally certain) and one of her abilities is to regain either one stamina or one sanity per doom token applied to the A.O. card. One of Cthulhu's innate abilities is to knock down investigator sanity and stamina both by one constantly throughout the game, so everyone is essentially one less in stamina and sanity as a max. I've played this with the ex-cultist that, in the Upkeep phase her doom token ability allows her then to take either a sanity or stamina token, allowing one of her stats to be able to max. Is this the correct interpretation of how to handle this character's ability given Cthulhu's penalty during Mythos Phase?


  4. Dam said:

    Roland is very nice I agree, but his Clue-regeneration never gets him to seal-level (barring Noden's Favor Mythos).

    No, but it gets him CLOSE, so when a gate opened at Innsmouth he'd kicked around there long enough between locations and encounters to deal with monsters and hop in the gate with enough clue tokens for a seal if he made it out alright. To REBUILD 5 would take too long, so he's basically being used now to keep monsters in check and try to keep the terror/deep one rising track down.


  5. Dam said:

    That's still quite a few Clues you need to collect (5 seals = 25 Clues), unless everyone starts with 3+, which they probably didn't (looking at you Dexter "Douchebag" Drake). There is also mention of LiTaS/bouncing for a couple of investigators, meaning even more time would be needed. But mainly a Clue issue, which multiple Elder Signs of course would take care of.

    Gravedigger has monster trophies function interchangably with clue tokens, and I accomplished the Fed's personal story, so he regenerates clue tokens if he goes under 4. The Fed got a lucky encounter at Esoteric Order of Dagon and made a check that gave him... three or four?... CTs, whatever fulfilled his personal story quota, and he closed and sealed a gate in Innsmouth.


  6. Dam said:

    Rovin said:

    We're about to start round 8 tonight - each round takes forever - and at this point it seems as if the high number of investigators has really hammered the game resources as well. Investigators are no longer able to get clue token from locations hardly, they're getting them mainly through encounter cards and such. We're currently at four seals with one that'll top off the Arkham Encounter phase on round 8 so we've nearly won via seal, though. We WOULD have sealed for win a couple of rounds earlier had a couple of our investigators not ended up Lost in Time and Space or bounced out in circumstances that stopped them from doing so (experimentation/memory loss for one). 

     

    5 seals in 8 turns sorpresa.gif ? Dam(n), that pretty darn effective. A few Elder Signs mean no need to collect Clues, so you can seal earlier, but still, takes 3 turns normally just to go through an OW. Hmmm, enter on turn 1, exit on 3 (seal #1), enter turn 2, exit turn 4 (#2), 3 and 5 (#3), 4 and 6 (#4), finally 5 and 7 (#5). Doable I suppose, though need a lot of breaks to go your way. Guess you're not playing vs Hastur and his 8 Clues to seal gran_risa.gif ?

    Nah, good ol' Cthulhu. The Shaman only requires four clue tokens to seal, and we focused the first couple of rounds on token gathering for two or three characters that started the game with a bit higher CT ratio - say, 3 or 4 - while I sent the Fed to Innsmouth to control that board and had the gravedigger guy keeping initial monsters busy. It was a focused attempt from the beginning, and on top of that we've had at least one "Hey, you drew a card that, if you pass the check, lets you go back to town so you can close and seal in the next round" card. 


  7. Avi_dreader said:

    Rovin said:

     

    Avi_dreader said:

     

    Rovin said:

     

    Vazanar said:

     

    Guess my group is still rather new to the game. We have normally 3-5 players each with one investigator. Do you all find the game better with 6 or so investigators instead of 3? Right now we have only the Innsmouth and Pharoah expansions.

     

     

    In our previous games we've used 2 investigators per player, and I think we'll be going back to that. 

     

     

    Two is my favorite number, but I can't manage the game with only 2 investigators when I solitaire.  Too many extra boards to cover.

     

     

    In your experience would four investigators be the base effective group for big-box board expansions?

     

     

    I can do three, but I remember *needing* four when I first started playing Kingsport and Dunwich together, for a while.  Then I was able to bump it back to three.  I've been able to manage with three investigators (but keep in mind, that's after three years of playing Arkham almost exclusively in my gaming time).  So yeah, four investigator's probably a good idea if you're playing three or four boards.  Three if you're only playing two boards.  Or more if you need it.  But I really think three investigators are enough to handle two boards.

    We're about to start round 8 tonight - each round takes forever - and at this point it seems as if the high number of investigators has really hammered the game resources as well. Investigators are no longer able to get clue token from locations hardly, they're getting them mainly through encounter cards and such. We're currently at four seals with one that'll top off the Arkham Encounter phase on round 8 so we've nearly won via seal, though. We WOULD have sealed for win a couple of rounds earlier had a couple of our investigators not ended up Lost in Time and Space or bounced out in circumstances that stopped them from doing so (experimentation/memory loss for one). 


  8. Avi_dreader said:

    Rovin said:

     

    Vazanar said:

     

    Guess my group is still rather new to the game. We have normally 3-5 players each with one investigator. Do you all find the game better with 6 or so investigators instead of 3? Right now we have only the Innsmouth and Pharoah expansions.

     

     

    In our previous games we've used 2 investigators per player, and I think we'll be going back to that. 

     

     

    Two is my favorite number, but I can't manage the game with only 2 investigators when I solitaire.  Too many extra boards to cover.

    In your experience would four investigators be the base effective group for big-box board expansions?


  9. Avi_dreader said:

    Rovin said:

     

    Tibs said:

     

    This means that with all three board expansions, you need to have 6 investigators in order to stand a decent chance at sealing, but still have a little breathing room. Most of my games are solo, and I prefer to play with all expansions, so that means I usually play alone controlling 6 investigators. It can be overwhelming at times.

     

     

    With Cthulhu as A.O. and running dual avatars of Dagon and Hydra, sealing in our current game is the major goal, and it's the first game we've actually sat down and strategized any such gameplay plan as opposed to just setting it up and having fun. 

     

     

    ::Laughter:: you're playing Dagon and Hydra?  Good luck.  I can't manage them (of course, I always tried playing them with three random investigators— probably a mistake).  Hydra's pretty easy, but Dagon's a pain.  With three characters I can't manage to prevent terror from rising, so it ends up costing too many clues over the course of the game, and it usually also makes the doom track too short— oh sure, I could probably win by gearing up from the beginning— definitely really, but premeditated gearing up seems a bit sleazy ;') it's one thing to do it more than mid-way through the game, in a desperate attempt at self-defence once failure is obvious, but planning it from the beginning?  Not for me.  Except against Atlach.  Hate...

    We've been lucky so far in that the first four rounds didn't activate the Innsmouth board (where I'm keeping the Fed mostly stationed in readiness collecting clue tokens, save a quick trip back to Arkham proper to deal with a Shoggoth) and we've worked hard to keep the monsters under strict control. We had a lucky break early on in that in the first round one of my wife's characters got a card that allowed all the players to roll for a chance at blessing, and consequently five of the eight characters earned blessed status. We had a bad break just in round 4 when the shaman woman, who was in another world, drew a card stating that alien experimentation on her either took two sanity or two spells and dumped her out of the other world without the sealing we were trying for. 


  10. Tibs said:

    This means that with all three board expansions, you need to have 6 investigators in order to stand a decent chance at sealing, but still have a little breathing room. Most of my games are solo, and I prefer to play with all expansions, so that means I usually play alone controlling 6 investigators. It can be overwhelming at times.

    With Cthulhu as A.O. and running dual avatars of Dagon and Hydra, sealing in our current game is the major goal, and it's the first game we've actually sat down and strategized any such gameplay plan as opposed to just setting it up and having fun. 


  11. Avi_dreader said:

    I find that four players is the maximum number of investigators I can enjoy controlling (but keep in mind, I've been playing this game for four years now).  I prefer to control two players, but I typically control three for solo games.  I think controlling one or two investigators is the ideal number (and obviously if you're essentially playing for your child you should count his as investigators you're controlling).

    I'd also strongly advise against weeding the monster cup until you've been playing this game for a *long* time and have a very good understanding of how it's balanced (but it seems like you're already figuring that out).  If you're too impatient to wait a long time, I'd suggest what you do is tilt the monster ratios a little (if there are multiple monsters of some types, you can cut them— but if you're going to do this, spend a few hours studying the various monsters and classifying them by difficulty— you should try to keep a similar difficulty level ratio in your monster cup— particularly if you're going for a Cthulhu themed game since the deep ones are pushovers unless you play with the custom herald Basatan).

    I also don't like playing games with more than five humans (since they tend to get bogged down with socializing), but that's another story.

    Good suggestion on comparing overall game difficulty ratios. That hadn't occurred to me at all. We're only four rounds in so I'll restore the regular monster cup for the rest of the game and keep your ideas in mind for my next attempt at a themed expansion game. 


  12.  My wife and I started an Innsmouth game tonight - bordering on scenario, really, since I essentially cut out all the monsters that aren't Cthulhu/Deep One/Innsmouth connected, save for cultists and witches and such because, of course, Cthulhu needs its worshippers, and Ghouls and a couple of undead beasties because the Gravedigger character is in the game - and, with eight characters on the board (we were going to go with six, but my 6 year old was insistent on playing, so we set him up with a couple of characters he chose when, in fact, we basically tell him how to play them), we're finding it hard to appreciate all of them that we DO have. Typically we're finding ourselves mainly focusing on a couple with the other two feeling underplayed (two of the other two, naturally, being our son's characters). I also feel I might have shortchanged the game somewhat by just running monsters with a literary connection to Cthulhu and Innsmouth, since that completely eliminated flying monsters, and in the last several games flying monsters have really added a lot of combat situation drama to encounters. 

    It's fun, but we won't be going with four per player again. It feels more like a strategic wargame and, if it makes sense, a lot less personal. 


  13. Avi_dreader said:

     

    Rovin said:

     

    Tibs said:

     

    awp832 said:

     

    tibs,  sometimes  I wonder if you're playing the same game as the rest of us...   :D

     

     

    I'm probably not. FFG's been kind enough to forward me an advance copy of 8th edition. It has investigator AND monster minis, 12 new AOs, and a corrected Patrice Hathaway and Call Ancient One spell!

    Dark Pharaoh's no less confusing, unfortunately...

     

     

    Such a thing exists?!?

     

     

    ::Laughter:: I'm assuming you're being ironic, but on the off chance you're new to this forum's insanity, I believe Arkham Horror is on it's second or third edition (I think it's second), so eighth will be some time in coming ;') Tibs only has his because his mastery of non-euclidean geometry allows him to reach his hand into the future and grab it (that's also how he can roll a one and a six on two three sided dice).

     

     

    LOL, I WISH I could be saying I was ironic, but I'm pretty new to this. That doesn't discount Tibs as a Hound of Tindalos in disguise, but I shouldn't suggest such things as, being a creature that travels via right angles, he's likely to take up residence in my Arkham Horror dice and do... bad... things....


  14. Tibs said:

    awp832 said:

     

    tibs,  sometimes  I wonder if you're playing the same game as the rest of us...   :D

     

     

    I'm probably not. FFG's been kind enough to forward me an advance copy of 8th edition. It has investigator AND monster minis, 12 new AOs, and a corrected Patrice Hathaway and Call Ancient One spell!

    Dark Pharaoh's no less confusing, unfortunately...

    Such a thing exists?!?


  15. Tibs said:

    Welcome!

    Rovin's got very good points. But assuming that you do get the base game and decide you enjoy it...

    My suggestion for you is to buy all the expansions, but use none of them. The game is at its simplest (complexity of rules) and easiest (difficulty to win) with no expansions. Play through it a few times, then one by one start playing the game with only one expansion mixed in (removing all others). I recommend trying the small-box expansions before playing the big boxes. However, the big boxes all have various elements that are universally compatible, such as extra investigators, AOs, features (injury/madness cards, epic battle deck, personal story cards).

    Playing each expansion on its own allows you to appreciate what each expansion offers, and how each differs from the base game and other expansions.  After you've tried each expansion a couple times on its own, you'll be able to decide whether you'd like to play with all expansions at once, or a random combination, or with a specific limitation (e.g. only one big- and small-box in at one time is a very popular play style).

     

    Of course, I'm biased: I like all the expansions for various different reasons. Some players don't like aspects of certain expansions, and some avoid entire expansions altogether. To answer all your questions regarding expansion specifics:

    The Complete Arkham Horror

    and

    Arkham Horror Review

    The first link is a lot more concise than the second. But both have polls showing how much the fans like each expansion, how "essential" each is and how well they work with other expansions, which elements are favored, etc.

    I pay the "good point" compliment back to Tibs in that, as a fairly new player to this game myself, I'm basically doing what he recommends and playing through one expansion per game to get a feel for it after having had a few sessions with the base game. I read the rulebooks to the expansions after I'd gotten them, and between what I'd gleaned from those and perusing the contributions in this forum I sort of got a feel for which of the Universal expansion modifications were really good for the overall game (examples would include Insanity and Injury cards and the Epic Battle cards). 

    If you're looking at getting into this game but are maybe at a financial point where you don't want to a lot of money at the moment purchasing the base game AND all the expansions, It might be a good idea to look through the game and expansion rulebooks and see what expansions - and elements from expansions - really appeal to you and focus on picking those expansions up first. Fantasy Flight has supplied PDFs of the game and expansion rulebooks here: javascript:void(0);/*1267737377241*/


  16. All things considered, this'd be an odd place to come to ask people if you should buy the game. What would they give you as a reasoning to NOT buy it? ;)

    If you can handle complicated board games that can take several hours and are a fan of dark/horror/science fiction themes and don't have a problem with a board game being cooperative instead of competitive, yeah, you'll probably get something out of this. You'd probably be best off to just get the base game and see if you find that enjoyable before investing in a lot of expansions, though.


  17. Avi_dreader said:

    DoctorDR said:

    I have a bunch of ziplock bags for keeping tokens separate.  Separate bags for clues, sliders, brains♥, money, and miscellaneous (really just doom, terror, closed, and the first player token).  

    I did this at first, but got six or so little plastic tub things with screw-on lids which I've been using for Stamina, Sanity, Doom, Money, Clue, and Gate tokens. Closed, Explored, "1, 2, 3" and Player One tokens go in with the gates. Everything else is currently in zip-lock bags. 

    I like the dice concept. Not only could you use red for stamina and blue for sanity, you could get shades of green to replace player clue tokens (the board ones have to stay on it until removed, of course) and money... say, maybe a d20 for each just in case. 

    For storage I took an empty plastic craft box and put the expansion and main board at the bottom. Then I simply took the black plastic organizer out of each boxed set, cut it in half to split the large storage space from the cards and dice section, and lined the inside with the four card/dice/item sections. After that I simply made a correct card-or-token sized cardboard "cover marker" for the various decks based on base game/expansion it's part of, put that on the end, rubber banded the cards, and stuck it in a slot with my homemade cardboard cover side up. The only exceptions to this are stuff that is soley used in relation to Ancient Ones (heralds, epic battle cards, specific tokens like Zhar or specific decks like Quachil Uttaus, so forth) which has remained in small plastic bags kept in a larger A.O. ziplock bag, and another large ziplock bag with the investigator related stuff. Everything in one box, marked, organized, and easy to find.


  18. jgt7771 said:

     

    MASQUERADE OF NIGHT
    Any Phase: Discard this card after failing a Horror Check to reduce the monster’s horror damage to 0 Sanity until the end of this combat.

    Why does this have the clause “until the end of this combat”? Once you’ve failed the Horror Check, what does it matter if this card is still active or not?
     

     

     

    It reads like the idea is the card is actively blocking the effect throughout the encounter. I suppose it's saying, in a technical sense, that at no time during the encounter will you take that Sanity loss. It's basically a technicality trying to avoid confusion.


  19. Avi_dreader said:

    Rovin said:

     

    Avi_dreader said:

     

     

    Avi_dreader said:

    The base game is pretty easy if you know what you're doing ;') especially if you skip monster surges.

     

     

    Yes indeed. We had everything figured out this time and played a session with the Black Goat of the Woods expansion no less, which made it harder. It was a very satisfying game strategically and such, though BG doesn't seem to have its additional elements implemented all that well (the corruption cards that were obtained were all dead-end or useless - "Ask around if anyone would like to join the cult" for example, which no one wanted to do) the continual cascade of dual monsters made for a fantastic game. I've implemented the injury and madness cards from the Dunwich expansion and the Epic Battle deck from Kingsport and really found them a lot of fun to use.

     

     

    Heh...  I agree with you on BGotW's corruption implementation.  I made a custom herald that's a bit more fun than the one the game comes with (unless your idea of fun is setting up a separate monster cup and running around frantically or being pulped).  It's the third picture, it's also called The Black Goat of the Woods.

    http://s622.photobucket.com/albums/tt307/avi_dreader/

     

    And yet...  I do like End of Everything.

    You've got everything implemented into this very nicely. I'll definitely give this herald a run next time I run Black Goat. Thanks!


  20. Villain said:

    Dam said:

     

    @ Villain: If the objective is to avoid final combat at all costs, where are EBs so cool (gear-heads probably should use EB all the time)? Even worse, they offer you a way out vs Bokrug that might be an impossible to win without EBs. And what's the point of having the Red cards if you're not going to see them barring house rules (going past 8 rounds in final combat is rarer than final combat wins vs Tsathoggua)?

     

     

    Like it or not, final combat is still an important part of the game (unless you always play against Azathoth) - Epic Battle cards give you all the more incentive to avoid it, but it still can (and will) happen. Just like you avoid having your investigators unconscious or insane, it still happens in the game - and yet the Injury and Madness cards are very cool.

    Moreover, with the Epic Battle cards the final combat may often last longer than 8 rounds. In the green deck alone there are several cards that hamper the investigators' attack, not to mention some Sinister Plot's won't allow investigators to attack at all that round. If you actually played with Epic Battle cards, you would know that seeing red cards is not nearly as rare as you believe (although still not common). This is especially true with large teams of investigators, where a nasty Epic Battle card may devour an investigator or two early on, reducing the attack power of the remaining team, which in turn makes the Ancient One last much longer than usual.

    As far as those few helpful cards (like Bokrug's or Tsathoggua's Sinister Plots) go, I think they add a great deal of uncertainty to final combat: with Epic Battle cards you might actually beat Bokrug (or even Tsathoggua!!!) without gearing up - but that would be an extremely rare and fortunate occurrence! A very Lovecraftian element, I'd say.

    Epic Battle cards make final combat worth playing - without them you might as well stop the game the moment the ancient one wakes up. If you try them, you'll see what I mean - since then playing final combat without them just feels very lame.

    -Villain
     

    In our game on Saturday night with Joe Diamond and one other player left when we'd hit the red cards in Epic Battle, Diamond had no more monster trophies left, meaning if the card would read "Ancient One Attacks Normally" or whatever he'd been instantly devoured. Instead we got a plot card, and the drawn card read that Shub-Niggurath would bud off Dark Young that'd combat the characters, with each victory removing a doom token. There was only one Doom Token left on the Ancient One sheet and Diamond had battled a Dark Young earlier in the game so the giant sanity loss wasn't gonna happen. Result: Diamond beats Dark Young, essentially coming back from nothing by chance to win the game.

    For me, that's SO much more fun than the straight battle math. Epic Battle is great fun. 


  21. Dam said:

    Tibs said:

    Must be one hell of a plan. You can dissuade people from getting it, even though you've never physically held a copy yourself!

     

    It's all down to mental powers cool.gif !

     

    @ Villain: If the objective is to avoid final combat at all costs, where are EBs so cool (gear-heads probably should use EB all the time)? Even worse, they offer you a way out vs Bokrug that might be an impossible to win without EBs. And what's the point of having the Red cards if you're not going to see them barring house rules (going past 8 rounds in final combat is rarer than final combat wins vs Tsathoggua)?

    So THAT'S why you seem so amazed at my final combat vs. Shub Niggurath story in the other thread... 


  22. Dam said:

     

    Rovin said:

    On thing I didn't like - and I know you're not SUPPOSED to like it, of course, as a player - is the "Game ends immediately, everyone is devoured" card in the Epic Battle Deck. While I understand why it's there and all and don't really disagree with its purpose - I'm a Cthulhu Mythos fiction fan and that's what really lead me to this game, after all - it just feels really anticlimactic. If we wage the battle and lose, fine. If we wage the battle and win, fine. But it came down to a very narrow margin and that card felt very party-pooperish. 
     
     

    That's one of the Red cards. Really, your final combat took 9+ rounds???

     

     

    Yes, it actually did. We had two characters with quite a few monster trophies - I think I had something like ten on Joe Diamond as I had him basically killing beasties keeping the terror track under control while another couple of characters focused more on gates. I had the "Dreamer" fellow from the Kingsport expansion as well,  but after he got out of the Dreamlands he just ended up stifled for the most part with bad luck. As for the other two - one was devoured in round 1, and another was devoured around round three or four. 

     It went down to the wire. In fact, Joe Diamond would have been devoured at the next round had we not drawn the card that dropped a Dark Young on him, with victory meaning loss of a doom token. S-N only had one DT left, Jack beat the Dark Young, game was over. 


  23. Avi_dreader said:

     

    Avi_dreader said:

    The base game is pretty easy if you know what you're doing ;') especially if you skip monster surges.

    Yes indeed. We had everything figured out this time and played a session with the Black Goat of the Woods expansion no less, which made it harder. It was a very satisfying game strategically and such, though BG doesn't seem to have its additional elements implemented all that well (the corruption cards that were obtained were all dead-end or useless - "Ask around if anyone would like to join the cult" for example, which no one wanted to do) the continual cascade of dual monsters made for a fantastic game. I've implemented the injury and madness cards from the Dunwich expansion and the Epic Battle deck from Kingsport and really found them a lot of fun to use.

    On thing I didn't like - and I know you're not SUPPOSED to like it, of course, as a player - is the "Game ends immediately, everyone is devoured" card in the Epic Battle Deck. While I understand why it's there and all and don't really disagree with its purpose - I'm a Cthulhu Mythos fiction fan and that's what really lead me to this game, after all - it just feels really anticlimactic. If we wage the battle and lose, fine. If we wage the battle and win, fine. But it came down to a very narrow margin and that card felt very party-pooperish. 

     

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