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javcs

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  1. Profit Factor is an abstraction of how wealthy they are. A Rogue Trader is wealthy enough that they aren't keeping track of the cost of their personal gear or personal expenses. And, usually, you don't actually "spend" Profit Factor. It's a roll under d100 roll, using PF as the target, modified by circumstances, and other factors. You can spend PF to gain a bonus on the roll, but normally, spending PF is reserved for Acquisitions like full up voidships or voidship components.
  2. To be fair, if a private party has the connections and resources to acquire and maintain attack craft, they probably also have the connections and resources required to build, train, and maintain a corps of pilots. They may have started with a seed group of ex-Navy pilots, or maybe favors were pulled to get some Navy pilot instructors or access to them for the initial group, and then the existing pilots are involved with training new pilots. For that matter, if you're willing to eat the costs involved in getting a couple manuals and self-taught pilots, you could probably start a core group of attack craft pilots drawn from people qualified to pilot other small craft. They would then pass on their knowledge to the next class of pilot-candidates.
  3. ... I'm calling BS. There is, so far as I am aware, little or nothing in the fluff to support the notion that Astartes are brainedwashed, mindless automatons, who are without a sense of individuality. At least, in the 40k fluff. I believe that something along those lines is true in the Starcraft Space Marine fluff, but that's an entirely different franchise. Plenty of room and precedent for freedom and individuality amongst the Astartes. Admittedly, some Chapters are more conformist than others, and within a Chapter, Astartes generally don't stray that far from their baseline/norms for their Chapter, but every Chapter's different (mostly/usually) to one degree or another. If he really felt bad about playing a massively disruptive character "because that's what the Chapter he's from has reprogrammed his brain and personality into", he wouldn't be playing a character from that Chapter in the first place - which, I believe was said to be a custom Chapter of his choosing/making. For that matter, somebody in the Imperium would have needed to sign off on creating the Chapter in the first place; I rather doubt that the Imperium would have signed off on creating a Chapter with that kind of character mindset/outlook. If they were like him, they'd've gotten purged before the Chapter was created, and if a Chapter were still needed, the Imperium would've started over.
  4. If you want to be particularly realistic, both manning the helm and operating the weapons of a spaceship should be strictly Intelligence based, not Agility or Ballistics Skill. However ... it's a game. The gun crews aren't actually making the decisions on how to train the gun they're working - that's all centrally directed. If they're doing anything with aiming, they're training the guns to the settings that are passed down. They're there to reload the guns, not aim them. As far as sticking a sniper in charge of an Iowa-class battleship's main battery? Assuming the central fire direction and control systems are all functional, I'd expect said sniper to do reasonably well, although there might initially be some trouble in gauging how much lead to give the target. And, since we're being realistic, there's a lot more to accurate sniping, especially when the range gets up, than just knowing how to aim a gun, and it's a lot of brainpower - gauging bullet drop and relative elevation, atmospheric conditions (ie, wind, rain, etc), coriolis effect, target movement and distance/bullet travel time, etc. Personally, I wouldn't bother trying to make it overly realistic. I'd simply assume that if somebody's operating the guns, then it's probably not their first time, and they've gone and done it before in drills and the like. Granted, I suppose it wouldn't be unreasonable for there to be or have been a Weapon Training talent or two for shipboard weapons, probably Macrobattery, Lance, Torpedoes, and Nova Cannon. Weapon Training (Macrobattery, and Lance) would have to be starting talents for the RT, Explorator, Archmilitant, and Void-Master, and be priced as regular Weapon Training for other careers, whereas Torpedo and Nova Cannon Training would probably end up being priced as Exotic Weapon Training.
  5. For that matter, a Space Hulk is something tossed on the tides of the Warp. One could describe a ship that has suffered damage to its warp drive in the process of escaping something, and then drifted in the warp until it managed to escape the warp as a space hulk. That said, I'd agree that any space hulk survivors/escapees would have been extremely fortunate in terms of the situation they were in on the space hulk, and none of them would be unscathed, and there would be mental scarring.
  6. No fight. I have always believed that voidships would use repulsor plates similar to a landspeeder but on a much larger scale. Maneuvering/ docking thrusters are used to push the massive ship back to high altitude where the plasma thrusters light off and bring the ship to orbit. In my game this is very power intensive usually requiring the complete shutdown of the warp drive in order to power the repulsors. Further, all external antenna need to be stowed away prior to re-entry. This renders long range auspex and vox comms inoperable though I allow for short range comms from backups. The base airspeed of a voidship is 50kph/move point. Voidships still maneuver in a 30 minute turn so even a marauder bomber would seem spritely and agile by comparison! As to the physics of the support struts I can only say yes they are massive! So what? This is a culture that builds continent sized cities in layers on top of themselves! I don't think holding up a starship of even cruiser size would be a problem! That's a viable explanation for some ships ... but when the Imperium can't properly maintain landspeeders and some sources go so far as to say basic grav plating can be an issue, it's a lot harder to believe. As far as entering the atmosphere, sure, you can do that with a cruiser, but you're not going to think about landing, you're entering a very low, very power intensive orbit, and you aren't planning to stick around for very long. Or rather, you're not going to think about landing a cruiser if you want to use it again. After all, any ship can land once. Most don't take off again. I'd say that if a world is properly equipped dirtside, you can very carefully land small transports and escorts. If a world is not so equipped and prepared ... you need specialized components on your small transport or escort ship in order to safely perform a rough-field landing and launch back to space. At least, as regard ships that are in common use and manufacture throughout the Imperium. There might be very very old ships with fancier technologies that would allow them to do more in atmosphere, but that's it. I have to respectfully disagree. Imperial Starships have exactly ZERO aerodynamic properties! This suggests that they must use some sort of artificial lifting mechanism however you care to define it. That said, if a ship can "fly" in atmosphere it can at least theoretically land. Whether that involves planetside facilities or not becomes a matter of Gm interpretation. I do agree with venkelos though; this is something the Gm should clearly define at game start in the beginning. The explorers need to know the capabilities of their ship if they are expected to act intelligently! The majority of the atmospheric maneuvering any Imperial ship will make is not so much flying as it is throwing oneself at/through the planet's atmosphere and (hopefully) missing the ground. And, of course, any ship can "land" once - it's just that then they usually can't take back off again afterwards. This, of course, is related to why only light ships can land - and, I suppose it would probably do to say that unless deliberately fitted out for planetary landings, it takes a more maneuverable ship, because their maneuvering/stationkeeping/docking/etc thrusters have enough output to overcome gravity and attain escape velocity from rest without employing the main drive. They're usually and mostly using vertical thrust (including thrusters that provide both lateral and vertical thrust), rather than anti-grav, and definitely not any aerodynamic properties. I absolutely agree it's something the GM and players should discuss and work out it in advance.
  7. No fight. I have always believed that voidships would use repulsor plates similar to a landspeeder but on a much larger scale. Maneuvering/ docking thrusters are used to push the massive ship back to high altitude where the plasma thrusters light off and bring the ship to orbit. In my game this is very power intensive usually requiring the complete shutdown of the warp drive in order to power the repulsors. Further, all external antenna need to be stowed away prior to re-entry. This renders long range auspex and vox comms inoperable though I allow for short range comms from backups. The base airspeed of a voidship is 50kph/move point. Voidships still maneuver in a 30 minute turn so even a marauder bomber would seem spritely and agile by comparison! As to the physics of the support struts I can only say yes they are massive! So what? This is a culture that builds continent sized cities in layers on top of themselves! I don't think holding up a starship of even cruiser size would be a problem! That's a viable explanation for some ships ... but when the Imperium can't properly maintain landspeeders and some sources go so far as to say basic grav plating can be an issue, it's a lot harder to believe. As far as entering the atmosphere, sure, you can do that with a cruiser, but you're not going to think about landing, you're entering a very low, very power intensive orbit, and you aren't planning to stick around for very long. Or rather, you're not going to think about landing a cruiser if you want to use it again. After all, any ship can land once. Most don't take off again. I'd say that if a world is properly equipped dirtside, you can very carefully land small transports and escorts. If a world is not so equipped and prepared ... you need specialized components on your small transport or escort ship in order to safely perform a rough-field landing and launch back to space. At least, as regard ships that are in common use and manufacture throughout the Imperium. There might be very very old ships with fancier technologies that would allow them to do more in atmosphere, but that's it.
  8. I'd allow it as well. To be more precise, I'd allow Zealous Hatred for Attack Actions (be it with a weapon or psychic power) that inflict Wound Damage, and only for the component of the attack that inflicts Wound Damage. That is to say, if, for example, you hit somebody with an attack effect that does both Wound damage and Characteristic damage, Zealous Hatred would only be triggerable by the Wound Damage, not the Characteristic damage.
  9. Technically speaking, Tainted Psyker is a Imperial Psyker only career, and once you've hit Ascension, you are no longer advancing in the Imperial Psyker career, whatever your Ascended career might be. Strictly speaking by that interpretation, anything with a must be Career X requirement can no longer be taken, while anything with a must not be Career Y requirement can be taken. However, taking alternate ranks after Ascension is something that the rules never actually addressed. As a result, I'd say consult with your GM, and employ common sense. Personally, however, I'd probably rule a career requirement employs an either/or mechanism for them. If either the pre-Ascension Career qualifies or the Ascended Career is an equivalent to a qualifying pre-Ascension career, then it is considered to match the qualifications. An Imperial Psyker who, for example, went into the Interrogator career would be able to take an Alt Rank that had a must be an Imperial Psyker requirement, or any other Alt Rank that did not have a Must Not be an Imperial Psyker/must not have a psy rating requirement. An Adept who went into the psyker talents and Ascended into a Primaris Psyker would be able to take both Adept-only and Imperial Psyker-only Alternate Ranks. Similarly, a Sororitas Character who Ascended into Interrogator or Inquisitor would still be counted as being a Sororitas for being allowed to take or not allowed to take alternate ranks, ie, no Warp-Dabbler for her.
  10. Ah, see, now when to do instant death is a more general discussion. When you want generalities ... don't ask something so specific without making clear that it's just an example, otherwise that just confuses that issue. The more general discussion of instant kills has happened before a few times, but the last few times I've seen that question I've also linked back to a previous discussion on the matter: https://community.fantasyflightgames.com/topic/194775-do-you-allow-insta-kills-in-some-instances/ The caveat being that while it's technically an Only War discussion, it applies more or less equally across all the game lines.
  11. Totally plausible. For that matter, whatever hidden Mcguffin gets found by accident, it's entirely possible that it predates the Dynasty's taking possession of the ship, depending on ownership history. It is for this reason that whenever you take possession of a ship, you need to thoroughly survey it. Especially if a prior owner was an enemy and/or heretic/pirate. If there's some evidence or remnant of their activities on your ship, you need to know about it before anybody else does, so you can either take advantage of the information or destroy evidence of things that could get you labeled a heretic and executed if the wrong people found out about its existence on your ship. However ... no GM should be expected to detail map an entire ship, unless it's ridiculously tiny for the universe (which is usually quite big enough for any other universe). And even then, the GM is probably still only going to detail map it if it is (a) important and/or (b) can find a suitable map to steal elsewhere and tweak to fit. The most a GM should reasonably be expected to do is a rough block layout of where things are in relation to other things, and perhaps travel times between the various important locations and/or sections onboard.
  12. Aside from the fact that it'll be obvious who did it, I believe that it's understood that there are guards in the service of the witches in the room, and they wouldn't be affected. Also, the witches would likely take offense and either prevent you from succeeding and/or smite you for the attempt. If you, as a GM are concerned that your players might try something like that, insert a disarmament scene - no bearing weapons into the presence of the witches when they're doing a foretelling. Or, since one or more of the PC RT's group resisted being drawn into the vision, it's perfectly reasonable to think that some members of the NPC RT's groups weren't drawn in either, and are conscious to notice and/or intervene.
  13. I'd allow attempting to redirect the Phenomena 75+ roll to below 75. That's a result in and of itself, admittedly, the result makes you roll on another table, but that's no different from getting a result that triggers a random mutation, you roll for the random mutation, but you don't say that the "go roll on the mutation table" directive isn't the result of the first roll. The Effect of the Phenomena 75+ roll is to trigger a Peril of the Warp - now go roll on the Perils table to find out just how screwed you are. You still can't attempt to change which Perils you get hit with. Also, I'd require the Phenomena redirect to happen before rolling for the Perils.
  14. I believe that there's usually some degree of penalty for failures. And/or some sort of time-dependent random encounter table. Also, if you spend enough time wandering around in an area, you will eventually find whatever it was you were looking for in it. The only question is, how long did it take to find and what happened to you while you were wandering around lost while looking. And, of course, with enough bad rolling, the players/characters may decide to pull back for now and make another attempt later, perhaps with more preparation.
  15. I may be mistaken about this, but I seem to recall reading somewhere that 'nids even drain the heat out of a planet's core, leaving it a truly dead world. If they can drain a planet's core of energy, then there's nothing stopping them from eating it too. There was a race in a SFRPG, long before the tyranids were invented, that would comeume a planet's biomass ad it's core too. They were "the mechanoids" from the palladium game of the same name. They would comsume a planet's biomass, stripmine and useful elements, then use charges to blow the crust apart to expose the molten core. They'd try a weird space time warping thing that would, if successful, which was like a 5% chance, condense the planet's molten hot core to a crystal about 50' across and use it to power their ship. So they have to blow up 20 planets to power one ship? On average? They must be hugely hated by everybody in that universe. Still, the point was, there is still a planet left behind after the Tyranids are done eating - therefore, there must be some reason that they do not eat the entire thing. My best explanation is that they cannot eat the molten core of a planet.
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