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Doc, the Weasel

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  1. Like
    Doc, the Weasel reacted to mfluder in First time ''GM'ing'',.... Man this is a lot of work!   
    So I picked up the beginners game when it was released but found no players.. I then snagged the core rulebook, GM KIT, and six sets of dice in hopes of finding a group to play with..... Much to my delight and with suprisingly little effort I was able to find 4 players one of which being my wife. The other three were veteran rpg players and nearly as familiar as myself with the captivating universe of star wars. My wife and I had never played an Rpg before.
     
     My first task was to speed read the immense rulebook as I wanted to skip the beginner gameplay and allow my players to develop their own characters. Then after a three hour session of character creation with everyone at a local restaurant (which we apparently overstayed our welcome at)  it was off to work creating the roots of an adventure...
     
     I started by pulling various hooks and events from the adventure in both the beginner game and events in the films. I then printed character sheets, maps, the opening dialogue and even a few reference photos for players to use during gameplay, even going so far as to make an opening crawl. After securing some quiet space at a local art gallery and grabbing a couple bottles of wine, we all met up and it was game on!!!
     
     It was a RIOT!! Everyone had fun and by the end of the night all the players had a decent grasp of the games core mechanic and their characters immediate obligations in the outer rim. One of my players even transcribed the entire first four hour game session with illustrations!! Needless to say I was amazed at how quickly everyone stopped looking like a deer in the headlights as I explained the dice mechanic and started having fun.
     
     
     My question is this... Exactly how much work should a GM be putting into the skeleton of a campaign?
     
     Should I make an ''on rails'' story? Should I give control to the players and just provide npc's for them to shoot at? Whats more fun? The three players in my group that DO have rpg experience say they have only played games where everyone just kinda ran off doing whatever but they where happy with the structure of the story i worked up as it helped keep things moving. 
     
    I'm just curious what other GM's do
     
     
    Oh and if anyone wants to read the campaigns progress just PM me.
  2. Like
    Doc, the Weasel got a reaction from Grimmshade in Stun Damage: A Metagaming Problem   
    I get the impression that people aren't using Scathing Tirade right.
    It's 1 target per success getting 1 stun. Advantages then distribute out 1 stun per advantage spent to one of those targets.
     
    So if you have 6 successes and 4 advantage (a solidly good roll) that is a total of 10 stun distributed out amongst 6 targets assuming there are 6 available (so a spread of 1,1,1,2,2,3 would work). 
     
    If there were only 1 target, they would get 5 stun. A big hit, but that roll would have likely been a more damaging rifle shot.
  3. Like
    Doc, the Weasel reacted to DavetheLost in Destiny and the Marauder   
    The Marauder player obviously enjoys shining in close combat. So, give it to him. There is nothing wrong with letting that character plow through hordes of mooks, if the adventure is designed for it. Don't have that melee be the resolution to the plot, just have it be something fun for that player to do. Give other players their fun thing to do as well.
    Toss in some encounters and challenges that can't be dealt with by melee combat.
    As for the sitting on all the Light Side tokens so the GM doesn't get any Dark Side, let them. They are also depriving themselves of a resource. Think of ways to make the adventure challenging without Dark Side points. I find that I very seldom use them for big things. My players on the other hand love to spend Destiny to do more epic stuff. I try to keep my game from turning into an adversarial GM vs Players contest. I want my players to have fun and tell an epic story. That is how I "win". I don't win by wiping the floor with them. The bad guys may win that way, but I am not a bad guy.
  4. Like
    Doc, the Weasel reacted to awayputurwpn in Obligation in a session, beyond the roll   
    A character's source of obligation can come up whenever you want in a story. The roll represents, mostly, the STRESS of dealing with said obligation. So really the two are separate in the story (the character worrying about the obligation, and the obligation itself), but often it makes sense that the character's obligation would take front and center of the story for your session, either causing, or being caused by, your PC's stress over the situation. 
     
    This is where set pieces can come in handy. If you want, you can have a set piece put aside for each of your players' obligations. When the obligation comes up, the set piece also comes up (maybe it's an encounter, maybe it's a conversation, maybe it's just a cameo by a villain to whom the PC is indebted). 
  5. Like
    Doc, the Weasel reacted to HappyDaze in Stun Damage: A Metagaming Problem   
    Your suggestions sound way too much like a GMing style I do everything to avoid.
  6. Like
    Doc, the Weasel reacted to AccidentalRob in Success - But with Despair? Is it really a fail.   
    IMO, if the text in the book doesn't jive with what you think should happen, don't do it. Grimmshade has some great examples of how to handle Despair. Last night during my group's game, the characters were chasing a death stick dealer through a cantina. One of the characters shot at the dealer with a stun blast – and was successful, but generated Despair. My decision was that though the attack hit, but did not take the dealer down. A crony of the dealer's made himself known and waylaid the attacking character – one more enemy to deal with, and the dealer had a better chance of getting away.
     
    My rule of thumb in these situations – do what adds drama, cinematic action or fun, and you can't go wrong.
  7. Like
    Doc, the Weasel got a reaction from Grimmshade in Success - But with Despair? Is it really a fail.   
    I agree that it's a bad mechanic with firing into Melee if a Despair can basically negate the whole success. 
     
    I think a better way of doing it is on a Despair result, an ally takes base damage of the weapon (no successes) regardless of whether you hit the original target or not.
  8. Like
    Doc, the Weasel got a reaction from Aservan in Ithorian Bellow – Is Ranged (Light) the right skill for it?   
    Am I the only one who thinks Ranged (Light) is an odd skill to pair with the Ithorian Bellow ability? 
     
    Resilience would make a lot more sense. I can imagine a brawny and stout character being able to damage people with sound more than an agile marksman.
     
    Does anyone else think this is odd, or have alternate ideas to what skill it should run off of?
  9. Like
    Doc, the Weasel reacted to PrettyHaley in Female players and the campaigns they want.   
    There's no arguing that there's a difference between what girls and guys generally like. There are always exceptions but, for example, the Twilight books appeal to FAR more girls than guys.My brother thought I was going to want sparkly Jedi because I love the Twilight books but... hello! I'm the target audience for the Twilight books!!! And, for the record, I had NO desire to have sparkly Jedi in Star Wars!!!
     
    I expect that a Star Wars story is going to have blasters, action, fights, daring escapes and wild adventures. I'm a girl and I LOVE that this is what Star Wars is all about. I love my sparkly, moody, romantic vampires over there. And I love my action packed space fantasy over here. They don't need to mix. They should NEVER mix.
     
    So just make it a Star Wars story. This game lets the players take a nice amount of control of the story, anyway. If a girl wants to find something in the story that you haven't put there on your own, she can put it there herself. All you have to do is make it matter.
  10. Like
    Doc, the Weasel reacted to Donovan Morningfire in Mechanically speaking, why create a AoR character over EotE...?   
    My thought is generally similar to korjik's, in that you either choose Obligation or Duty to start with, which determines the type of campaign you're running.  If using Duty, then the PCs don't get an Obligation and as such can't take additional Obligation, even if using EotE careers & specs, but instead get the Rebellion Resources option.  Conversely, if using Obligation, then the PCs don't get a Duty to start with and instead get a free transport rather than picking a Rebellion Resource, even if some of the PCs were built using AoR careers & specs.
     
    That said, I've toyed around a bit with what mouthymerc suggested, namely in allowing AoR characters to take a 5 point Obligation at character creation, reflecting some element of their past that still haunts them and might come up from time to time, in addition to having a Duty to the Rebellion  This way, the AoR PCs can pick up a few extra resources (namely credits for extra gear).  It's not broken the game, but while I've not had the chance to see if there's any long-term effects, I doubt such a thing would come up.
  11. Like
    Doc, the Weasel got a reaction from Ahrimon in Thoughts on the Lightsaber   
    Rather than be punitive to players who want to do things that the GM doesn't want them to do, why not just not introduce any Lightsabers in the first place?
     
    It seems like people are trying to solve a problem that they themselves would have to create.
  12. Like
    Doc, the Weasel got a reaction from capnhayes in Space Combat - Speed Issues   
    It's assumed that in space combat, ships aren't moving in perfectly straight lines. They are diving and weaving around trying not to get shot. You are right to switch to a Chase when you did.
     
    Also, this game isn't like SAGA in that there is a robust rule system that is universally applicable for everything. This one is designed around a GM who makes common sense rulings rather than tightly adhering to a rule-book.
     
    If doing the thing that makes sense causes a problem with a group, I'd be more apt to blame the group.
  13. Like
    Doc, the Weasel got a reaction from FangGrip in Stormtroopers are people too   
    Oh I thought we were talking about Stormtroopers. Those Ewoks are vicious. Shoot on sight. If you hear "nub," don't wait around for the other "nub."
  14. Like
    Doc, the Weasel got a reaction from JaceMoonstrider in New Live Play Podcast - Edge of the Empire: Lost Sons   
    Our group has taken up podcasting our play sessions and we have started with our current EotE game, the home-brew story Lost Sons. (here's the opening crawl)

     

    Some of you may know the group from the Warhammer podcasts at Reckless Dice (where we did Underworld Rising and Buried but not Forgotten). 

     

    Lost Sons is the first adventure based on a player generated setting. Our first session (which, unfortunately wasn't recorded) was the players and I creating the setting and NPCs along with their characters (the process was documented on the forum in this thread). 

     

    We have parts 1 and 2 up on our new site, BeggingForXP.com, and I hope to have part 3 up in a day or two. Please head on over and take a listen. 

     

    If I do say so myself, we have a great group of players that add a lot of flavor to the session (though competence isn't always their specialty). 

     

    Thanks for listening and good gaming.
  15. Like
    Doc, the Weasel reacted to Conviction in New Live Play Podcast - Edge of the Empire: Lost Sons   
    I like your PDF's bro
  16. Like
    Doc, the Weasel reacted to Jon D in Stormtroopers are people too   
    *grabs popcorn*
  17. Like
    Doc, the Weasel reacted to The Grand Falloon in Auto Fire with a scope?   
    One houserule I've been considering is the use of "zones" instead of range bands, and I think they may come in handy here.  I was tinkering with this in my Savage Worlds games, and it's kind of a middle ground between the two.
     
         So, as has been mentioned, the length of a round is not set, and an attack roll does not represent one squeeze of the trigger.  Some folks have suggested that this gives a person time to line up a shot with the scope, fire a few rounds, then pick a new target, fire again, and so on, because that's what autofire is for: blasting a lot of people.  The problem is that lining up multiple shots with a rifle, especially with a scope, takes longer than doing so with a pistol (let's ignore for a moment that the rifle is more accurate, the pistol is quicker).  And you can't attack multiple targets with a pistol.  So I would say that one combat roll involves a fairly short exchange of actions.  
         The place where autofire gets difficult is when you have targets in multiple locations.  If there are five guys behind a stack of crates, autofire is your buddy, because you can sweep your blaster back and forth across those crates pretty easily.  However, if there are two guys behind those crates, and two guys on the catwalk above you, and one guy nearby brawling with the wookiee, you're not going to be able to target all five of those guys with a single roll.
         My recommendation is to allow autofire to strike multiple targets within a single zone.  A zone is about the size of the smaller range bands, so it's a pretty simple conversion.  A cantina might have only two or three zones, such as the bar, the tables, and the stage.  Each zone should have a couple of distinct features that characters can take advantage of (let the players suggest them, less work for you).  It's a little less narrative, because it kinda requires a map, but the map can be a very simple sketch, which a lot of folks use anyway.
  18. Like
    Doc, the Weasel got a reaction from Rikoshi in I screwed up my XP and weapon economy   
    I would suggest allowing them to continue being combat gods, with few peers in the galaxy. What you as the GM should do then is to give them hard choices as to how to direct this power. 
     
    Look at their Motivations and Obligations. Is there something that a character cherishes? Put it at risk and if they want to save it, they have to give up something else cherished (or hurt it in the fallout). There should be no easy outs, it's time to see what these guys really stand for. 
     
    They have all the power they need to make the things they want happen. It's time to make them question what they want. 
  19. Like
    Doc, the Weasel reacted to themensch in I screwed up my XP and weapon economy   
    Wait up a minute - before you go changing anything, it's worth evaluating what your group wants.  Obviously, they like fighting, so why not give it to them?  
     
    You're part of this group, too - do you feel like you're not having fun because it's so combat-heavy?  
     
    If everyone's having fun and it's just a matter of balancing your combat, that's an easy fix.  
  20. Like
    Doc, the Weasel reacted to Dex Vulen in Doctor with 3 Intellect?   
    You know what you call a doctor who graduated last in his class?
     
    Doctor.
  21. Like
    Doc, the Weasel reacted to progressions in How Many Skill Checks   
    One thing I've been noticing a lot of, in both Beyond the Rim and Long Arm of the Hutt, are skill checks where the outcome is predetermined to be a success, but the success or failure of the check determines how well it works.
     
    In making Astrogation checks, a success means the trip is quiet and uneventful, where a failure means the party is attacked by bounty hunters on the way or has technical troubles they need to deal with.
     
    It's not always that you succeed or fail at what you're rolling a skill check for, it can be more about HOW the outcome is produced based on the results of the check.
  22. Like
    Doc, the Weasel reacted to That Blasted Samophlange in Attributes first, skills later?   
    I say this in every thread, but the choice to build up your attributes or skills should be more about what suits your character than what is mathematically superior. If you are playing a grizzled old doctor trying to see the galaxy or ex bounty hunter coming out of retirement don't put any experience towards attributes. Buy skills and talents. If you are playing a young character that hasn't done anything but fix moisture vaporators then by all means go all out for attributes.
    If you want to be an awesome pilot focus on talents rather than just skill ranks.
  23. Like
    Doc, the Weasel got a reaction from Spjork in Space Combat - Speed Issues   
    Honestly, I'm not sold on making Piloting checks in open terrain for chases. If everyone is moving in a straight line, the faster vehicle wins. I'd take the difference in speed and check that value as speed to determine how long (so 3 vs 4 has a difference of 1, and 1 speed vehicles take 2 maneuvers to change 1 range).
     
    Of course, in those situations savvy pilots look for hazardous areas to lose their pursuers ("they'd be crazy to follow us"). 
     
     
     
    It's funny, because those "old" ways of doing things are fairly new as far as the hobby is concerned. The real old ways (like 70's, early 80's) fall right in line with this: Loose rules, and the GM fills in the gaps. d20 really shifted a whole generation of gamers towards having specific rules for all occasions rather than just making something work at the table. 
  24. Like
    Doc, the Weasel got a reaction from OB-1 in Space Combat - Speed Issues   
    Honestly, I'm not sold on making Piloting checks in open terrain for chases. If everyone is moving in a straight line, the faster vehicle wins. I'd take the difference in speed and check that value as speed to determine how long (so 3 vs 4 has a difference of 1, and 1 speed vehicles take 2 maneuvers to change 1 range).
     
    Of course, in those situations savvy pilots look for hazardous areas to lose their pursuers ("they'd be crazy to follow us"). 
     
     
     
    It's funny, because those "old" ways of doing things are fairly new as far as the hobby is concerned. The real old ways (like 70's, early 80's) fall right in line with this: Loose rules, and the GM fills in the gaps. d20 really shifted a whole generation of gamers towards having specific rules for all occasions rather than just making something work at the table. 
  25. Like
    Doc, the Weasel got a reaction from OB-1 in Space Combat - Speed Issues   
    If your players are gaming the system to allow slower ships to outrun faster ones, then there isn't any immersion to break.
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