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EvaUnit02

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Everything posted by EvaUnit02

  1. For the record, my opponent was a nice guy and there was no ill-will between us. There isn't a lot of time in these tournaments and it was my responsibility to understand the FAQ. Out of respect for both my opponent and the time limit, I accepted his answer without caveat.
  2. Yesterday I flew against a list that had a Scum Y-Wing that could deal uncancelable hits (crits were still cancelable) I asked my opponent to verify that the hits were only uncancelable by dice and he said no, they were simply uncancelable period. Can someone point me to a pilot or upgrade that does this? I can't seem to find it in my collection.
  3. How many points are folks seeing players give up for the chance to choose who first player is?
  4. So, is there a consensus for competitive play? In particular, have people been fielding 300pt lists with more than two squadrons of the same type from the wave 1 squadrons?
  5. Armada Trestle Table. My buddy found this and I thought it was cute. Not only is is named aptly but the dimensions are almost perfect! =)
  6. 1) I don't know much else to say so I suppose this will probably be my last attempt to argue this but if you honestly cannot see the difference between choosing the wrong maneuver or chasing the wrong ship (which are poor tactical decisions) and completely forgetting to take an action with a ship (which is a simple oversight) then we are simply at an impasse. 3) Helping someone isn't even remotely against the point of good sportsmanship (read: sporting competition). However, you conflate making decisions for your opponent with reminding your opponent of mistakes so I suppose we'll never see eye-to-eye on this. 4) There's no confusion. It does make you a good sport. 5) This is simply pedantry on your part. 6) It has more in common with letting your opponent accidentally skip an action than it does with reminding your opponent to take said action. 7) Well, you'd be wrong. The "spirit of the game" refers to the design goal of the game. Is it a test of speed? A test of strength? A test of tactics? A test of strategy? A test of execution? Playing in the spirit of the game means to play strictly within the intent of the game. As example of playing within the spirit of the game (i.e., sportsmanship): "In soccer, it is considered good sportsmanship to kick the ball out of play if a player on the opposing side is injured; when the ball is to be thrown in, it is also considered to be good sportsmanship in this situation to kick it (or throw it) back to the other team who had intentionally kicked it out. Gamesmanship arises in this situation when, rather than passing the ball back to the side who kicked the ball out, the injured player's teammates keep the ball after the throw-in. Whilst not illegal or against the rules of the sport, it is heavily frowned upon." But, you've already made it quite clear that you see nothing unsporting about such behavior so I suppose we'll just have to disagree. What you're advocating is gamesmanship, not sportsmanship. They are opposites.
  7. I don't think anyone was saying that. It's when people expect you to remind someone, and call it poor sportsmanship if you don't that there's an issue. Well, I suppose just as one has to live with forgotten actions, you'll just have to live with that.
  8. Heh, that's not by my logic. That's by your logic. They're not inadequate in my book. Again, that's the disconnect. You see forgetting to do something as an inadequacy. You keep insisting that helping them in this regard is helping to play their game for them. I don't. I see their mistake as unrepresentative of their ability to play the game the way it was intended to be played. You are necessarily not flying better than the other guy if you're not being a good sport about, for example, reminding him that he has an action to take with a ship. If you think you are then I suppose we're at an impasse. The whole concept of "potentially sacrificing your own spot" is just bad sportmanship, in my opinion. As I've argued before, if all you're interested in is the win then that is the literal antithesis of sportsmanship. If someone shows up late to a game and loses by forfeit, you don't say he's a bad player. You don't claim to be the better player. You take a win within the rules of play but you didn't win a game of X-Wing. You won a game on a technicality. That's completely meaningless withing the spirit of the game and it is equally as meaningless to capitalize on honest and correctable mistakes. Take your win, of course, but don't expect me to consider you the better player. You're not entitled to that. It should be pointed out that you're also a poor sport if you blame an opponent for only winning because he didn't point out your mistakes. Don't forgive yourself. Be forgiving of your opponent. Respect your opponent by doing your best. This is the way of the sportsman.
  9. This is the disconnect, in my opinion. X-Wing is not a game of general mental ability. it's a game of list building and tactics. It is by that score that someone like me wants to play. ...and in the same way, if you beat Usain Bolt because he tripped and fell, then sure, you won the event. Just as in this thread, no one would deny that. What they would deny is the notion that you're a faster runner than he. You're not, you know you're not, and you know your win comes with an asterisk. I don't want a diminished win like that. I want to win in the spirit of the game and that means winning by building and flying my list better than the next guy, not capitalizing on unrepresentative mistakes. It smacks of the antiquated notion that scoring an 'A' on an achievement test displays aptitude. It doesn't. It just shows that you scored an 'A' on a test.
  10. Either that or he'll forget when everything on his calendar starts for the rest of his life ;-)
  11. It's not like that at all. A boxer letting his guard down is like an opponent taking a focus instead of an evade when an evade would have been a better decision. There's no need to correct your opponent's tactical mistake. Instead, it's like the boxer not realizing a round has started and you sucker punch him. That's not sporting.
  12. How can you know he didn't intend them? How does forgetting something become artificial? If I'm tapping my foot, sighing a lot, asking "are you done yet?" over and over again. Then I'm trying to rush the other person, and that's actually against the rules. But everyone has time to look at the current game state and make sure everything is how they want it to be. If I move a ship and forget to take an action, it's my own fault for not paying attention. The other guy doesn't owe me the chance to take an action. He can, but not doing so does not make him a poor sport. I view a fairly won game to be one when I can say I beat the other guy by the rules. If that means taking advantage of his mistakes, then that doesn't mean I won unfairly, because in any competitive endeavor part of it, is taking advantage of the situation when you can. Otherwise, we may as just roll a couple dice at the start of the match and decide the winner on who rolls better. At that point skill no longer matters, it's just random chance. You can't always know. It's when you do know that you should speak up, in my opinion. If he's not taking any action with a ship, there is no harm to the game by reminding him that he has an action. If you can't clearly know his intent, well then it's his mistake to bear. If you genuinely believe that X-Wing is about exploiting any and all weaknesses in your opponent, well then fair enough. Although by that score you should probably also be trying to intimidate opponents, buy up all ships in the local area to prevent opponents from buying them, getting in good with stores and TOs to ensure store championships are held on days and at times most beneficial to you, and hey, maybe even making sure your opponent's side of the table was freshly mopped. You should be doing everything in your power to put your opponent at a disadvantage provided what you're doing isn't against the tournament rules. That's just not something I can get down with and it, along with forgetfulness, is not something I believe to be in the spirit of the game. To be clear, yes, it is ultimately your own fault for forgetting your options. I'm not arguing otherwise. You also would have fairly won a game were you to have won within the boundaries of the rules. There is no question of that. The question was one of sportsmanship. That is to say, whether or not you are playing the game with integrity and within the spirit of its rules. I think your last paragraph jibes with my point, though. The spirit of the game is that it is skill that should matter. X-Wing isn't intended to be a game of memorization. It isn't meant to be a test of who is better at remembering procedures. It is intended to be a game where two people use their skill in building and flying squadrons better than the other guy by taking advantage of the holes in their opponent's lists and tactics. That's the spirit of the game.
  13. It is binary, in my opinion. If you're not being a good sport, you're necessarily being a bad sport. There's no neutral sport. You either want to play in the spirit of the game or you don't. If one sees his opponent forget to cloak with his ACD and doesn't speak up, I will judge him to be a bad sport. He's trying to win on technicality rather than the spirit of the game. Otherwise, I agree. As has been mentioned repeatedly, a player is under no obligation to remind his opponent of his options. Should an opponent lose to forgetfulness, then that's a loss that's squarely on him. Moreover, as you suggested, not every opponent error is one that requires your intervention. Judgment and critical thinking are important and there is a spectrum of choices. There are some decisions that you can't reasonably deduce. There are also some decisions that are just bad tactics. Those situations don't beg for reminders. However, there are some that are clearly decisions that an opponent didn't intend to make and artificially harm his position in the game's state. These are things I should think a good sport wants to avoid. To look at it another way, if you can be proud about how your agency won a match, then you were likely a good sport. If instead you won because someone forgot to take an action, because someone was fifteen seconds late to the table and got DQed, or someone tripped, hit their head on the table, and had to forfeit...well, you didn't win a game of X-Wing. You just won a game. You legitimately won, mind, but really it's meaningless in terms of the spirit of the game. That's what sportsmanship is. "Sportsmanship is an aspiration or ethos that a sport or activity will be enjoyed for its own sake."
  14. NO ONE IS EXPECTING YOU TO HELP AN OPPONENT WITH THEIR STRATEGY. Jesus Christ.
  15. I edited it minutes before your post because I just knew someone would be pedantic. My edit reads: "f I beat someone in a game of Chess because he thinks only pawns can move, can only move one space forward, and I didn't tell him otherwise, yeah okay, I guess I win. Really though, I wasn't playing Chess." My point still stands. Someone is ignorant of their full breadth of options and you're trying to capitalize on that. X-Wing is a game about knowing when to use your options. It's not a game about who has the better memory of all their options. So my opponent forgets to use engine upgrade. I don't remind him. Now I'm all of a sudden not playing X-Wing. Yeah, no, I don't think so. Chess players don't remind their opponents what their options are in tournaments because they should already know what they can do. if they forget a certain play or make a wrong move then their opponent will take advantage of it. So if we're likening X-Wing to chess then I see nothing wrong with taking advantage of your opponent's mistake. ...or you could stop painting the world as black and white. You don't have to pretend like a reminder is the equivalent of playing the game for your opponent. Did he forget to boost? Okay, maybe he forgot to boost. You can't reasonably know that though because as far as you're aware, he took the action he meant to take. No need to remind him that he has an engine upgrade. Did he forget to take *any* action? Perhaps then you could chime in before he reveals his next dial. Clearly, he didn't intend to refuse taking his action. Does he have a turret secondary but always tries to get you in his arc? Well, maybe he's going for primary shots. Does he have a target, but elects not to make an attack at all? Maybe you ought to remind him that he has a shot. Play the game the way it's meant to be played, which assumes two rational players. You can't hope to prevent him from making all errors but you can help mitigate the obvious ones to ensure the game is sporting. Again, you're under no obligation to remind an opponent of potential forgetfulness and any negative side effects are certainly his to bear. Just don't pretend you also get to call yourself a good sport in those situations. You most certainly do not.
  16. I edited it minutes before your post because I just knew someone would be pedantic. My edit reads: "f I beat someone in a game of Chess because he thinks only pawns can move, can only move one space forward, and I didn't tell him otherwise, yeah okay, I guess I win. Really though, I wasn't playing Chess." My point still stands. Someone is ignorant of their full breadth of options and you're trying to capitalize on that. X-Wing is a game about knowing when to use your options. It's not a game about who has the better memory of all their options.
  17. This kind of thing comes up with war games a lot, too. There are people who don't like when a war game isn't historical. I'm of the opinion that you can either have a fun, balanced game or you can have a historically (or canonically) accurate game. I prefer the former. If I want a recounting of history/canon, I can read an encyclopedia or something.
  18. Surely you recognize the reality that the missed opportunities (tournament) rule exists to keep the game as smooth running as possible. The designers didn't sit down and say to themselves, "I really want to make a Star Wars game about capitalizing on your opponent's forgetfulness of how to play." If I beat someone in a game of Chess because he thinks only pawns can move, can only move one space forward, and I didn't tell him otherwise, yeah okay, I guess I win. Really though, I wasn't playing Chess. It is clear that X-Wing is a game of tactical combat. I want to play that game. You are by no means obligated to remind your opponent not to forget about an ability or an action but at least be honest here: you don't want to play X-Wing at that point. You just want a check mark in the 'W' column.
  19. I'll have to respectfully disagree with you. Sportsmanship doesn't have caveats of setting or who the players are. Sportmanship is about whether or not you want to play the game the way it was intended to be played. That means being fair, being courteous, being respectful, and not trying to take advantage of situations outside the intent of the game. You'd be hard pressed to convince me that winning a game of X-Wing is supposed to be about capitalizing on your opponent's forgetfulness but hey, if you truly believe that, I'm all ears. Otherwise, I want to win a game of X-Wing, not simply defeat an opponent. So I guess in football when there's a false start or too many men on the field the other team aren't being good sports for accepting the penalty? That's a terrible analogy. Infractions of the game's rules is not the same thing as forgetfulness. Instead, it would be like a quarterback forgetting that you can use you hands in football with you just standing there letting him try to take the snap with his teeth.
  20. I'll have to respectfully disagree with you. Sportsmanship doesn't have caveats of setting or who the players are. Sportmanship is about whether or not you want to play the game the way it was intended to be played. That means being fair, being courteous, being respectful, and not trying to take advantage of situations outside the intent of the game. You'd be hard pressed to convince me that winning a game of X-Wing is supposed to be about capitalizing on your opponent's forgetfulness but hey, if you truly believe that, I'm all ears. Otherwise, I want to win a game of X-Wing, not simply defeat an opponent.
  21. While I would by no means expect my opponent to remind me of my upgrades and abilities, I think intentionally trying to win on a mistake makes you a bit of a dork. If you want to win that badly, take it. You want it more than I do. I always try to remind my opponents to take actions and use abilities when it seems obvious that they are forgetting. However, I won't give them tactical advice.
  22. Did FFG delete the finals from their Twitch broadcast history? I can't seem to find it this morning.
  23. Or, conversely, everyone just wants to play the game and have fun while having to deal with the fact that seemingly every other day there's a new thread about how the game is broken or ruined or extortionate or sucks.
  24. I never quite understood the allure of literally gambling with your money. "I'm going to go buy $50 worth of stuff today. Hope it's stuff I actually want!"
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