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Morangias

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  1. Like
    Morangias got a reaction from Noahjam325 in Minion Deaths and the Hp pool   
    To take it to complete basics, Genesys combat rules don't simulate combat - they simulate the narrative of combat, with the aim of creating fast-paced, eventful encounters in the vein of an action movie.
    When you atta... sorry, you don't actually "attack" in Genesys, you "perform a combat check". So when you perform a combat check in Genesys, you're not tracking how well your character aims, where the bullet goes and how much damage it does - you're tracking your character's narrative potential to inflict harm and weighing it against the enemy's potential to take a beating and still remain relevant to the narrative. This can mean taking a single shot and landing a single bullet between the enemy eyes if that's what best fit your character's style and the result of the dice. But to decide that only one bullet was shot before determining the mechanical results of the check is putting the cart before the horse.
    Back to Autofire, Genesys is an exception-based system, meaning things run according to a set of general rules, unless a specific rule creates an exception. In the case of Autofire, the general rule is that one combat check can score one "hit", understood, again, not as a single bullet landing on target but by the weapon dealing its base damage once to the target. The specific rule is that by jumping through certain hoops, you can score multiple "hits", i.e. apply your weapon's base damage multiple times, potentially also to multiple enemies. This is, again, not a simulation of what happens when multiple bullets are fired in an attack, but an emulation of the Hollywood trope of a guy with a machine gun mowing down entire armies.
    But machine gun wielders aren't the only ones who can mow down henchmen in large numbers in fiction! Whether it's Aragorn massacring Orcs with Anduril or John Wick gunning down mobster after mobster with his pistol, dispatching multiple mooks in the blink of an eye is something almost every hero partakes in at some point in their career - which is where the Minion rules come into play, letting you target up to five minions as one individual and dispatch as many of them as your damage roll allows. This isn't against the autofire rule in any way, because Autofire is a way to target multiple mechanically distinct individuals, and minions aren't mechanically distinct individuals. In fact, the two rules play to each others' strengths and by spraying minions with an Autofire weapon and scoring multiple hits, you can mow down a group of minions in no time!
    Regarding the notion of "minion personhood", the very purpose of having minion rules is so that you don't have to treat everyone at the battlefield as a fully fleshed out actor. But the important thing is, this is an entirely OOC concern - it's not that this isn't a real guy with his own life, hopes and dreams, it's just that in the context of this action scene, he doesn't matter and isn't supposed to amount to much. And, again, it's not like they die because you shot a bullet into their friend - if you perform a combat check against a minion group and the result says you killed X minions, that means you fired enough bullets to kill X minions. Whether narratively it means you gave everyone the special forces treatment of two in the heart and one in the head or that you fired a single bullet that went through one guy's brain, ricocheted off the wall and detonated the flamethrower tank the other one held, exploding the whole group, depends largely on the style you're aiming for and your individual tastes. But please don't say the rules break the narrative when you introduce contradictory assumptions into the narrative before the dice tell you what actually happened.
  2. Like
    Morangias got a reaction from Colgrevance in Minion Deaths and the Hp pool   
    To take it to complete basics, Genesys combat rules don't simulate combat - they simulate the narrative of combat, with the aim of creating fast-paced, eventful encounters in the vein of an action movie.
    When you atta... sorry, you don't actually "attack" in Genesys, you "perform a combat check". So when you perform a combat check in Genesys, you're not tracking how well your character aims, where the bullet goes and how much damage it does - you're tracking your character's narrative potential to inflict harm and weighing it against the enemy's potential to take a beating and still remain relevant to the narrative. This can mean taking a single shot and landing a single bullet between the enemy eyes if that's what best fit your character's style and the result of the dice. But to decide that only one bullet was shot before determining the mechanical results of the check is putting the cart before the horse.
    Back to Autofire, Genesys is an exception-based system, meaning things run according to a set of general rules, unless a specific rule creates an exception. In the case of Autofire, the general rule is that one combat check can score one "hit", understood, again, not as a single bullet landing on target but by the weapon dealing its base damage once to the target. The specific rule is that by jumping through certain hoops, you can score multiple "hits", i.e. apply your weapon's base damage multiple times, potentially also to multiple enemies. This is, again, not a simulation of what happens when multiple bullets are fired in an attack, but an emulation of the Hollywood trope of a guy with a machine gun mowing down entire armies.
    But machine gun wielders aren't the only ones who can mow down henchmen in large numbers in fiction! Whether it's Aragorn massacring Orcs with Anduril or John Wick gunning down mobster after mobster with his pistol, dispatching multiple mooks in the blink of an eye is something almost every hero partakes in at some point in their career - which is where the Minion rules come into play, letting you target up to five minions as one individual and dispatch as many of them as your damage roll allows. This isn't against the autofire rule in any way, because Autofire is a way to target multiple mechanically distinct individuals, and minions aren't mechanically distinct individuals. In fact, the two rules play to each others' strengths and by spraying minions with an Autofire weapon and scoring multiple hits, you can mow down a group of minions in no time!
    Regarding the notion of "minion personhood", the very purpose of having minion rules is so that you don't have to treat everyone at the battlefield as a fully fleshed out actor. But the important thing is, this is an entirely OOC concern - it's not that this isn't a real guy with his own life, hopes and dreams, it's just that in the context of this action scene, he doesn't matter and isn't supposed to amount to much. And, again, it's not like they die because you shot a bullet into their friend - if you perform a combat check against a minion group and the result says you killed X minions, that means you fired enough bullets to kill X minions. Whether narratively it means you gave everyone the special forces treatment of two in the heart and one in the head or that you fired a single bullet that went through one guy's brain, ricocheted off the wall and detonated the flamethrower tank the other one held, exploding the whole group, depends largely on the style you're aiming for and your individual tastes. But please don't say the rules break the narrative when you introduce contradictory assumptions into the narrative before the dice tell you what actually happened.
  3. Like
    Morangias reacted to thedonnie in Minion Deaths and the Hp pool   
    Autofire is more of a rule that allows one to inflict multiple strikes in an unlimited version. This does not mean that it is the only rule to allow to hit multiple targets.

    Think of it like this:
    You have an automatic rifle and you are fighting a creature that has been animated by alchemy and electricity a la Adam from the novel Frankenstein.
    You can then aim the rifle right at the monster and then unload all of your rounds on it. This means that you have the ability to let loose a steady stream of bullets on the monster that can cause a LOT of damage based on how many advantages you get.

    It is in contrast to Linked which says you can only do X amount of "hits" on the target and is limited to one target.

    By "hits" I am not talking about a specific striking of your weapon against the enemy but the "hit" is the base damage. So with Linked, you get X amount of times of base damage max but with autofire, it is only limited by the amount of advantage you roll.

    When I am running the game, I always go for the cinematic. When the sniper shoots the minions, this does not mean that they get one shot but that they take out this minion and then get another round off to take out the other minion and then another shot to damage the third minion. Or else the sniper shoots the minion in the head who then drops the grenade they were about to throw which then explodes and takes out the second minion and damages a third one.

    All of this means that, from a mechanical standpoint, the damage cascades to take out the other minions in the group.

    I know that this game takes awhile to get adjusted to. You need to shift from thinking like other games where things are spelled out and need to take some creativity and start imagining how to make the rules help you tell the story and not how the rules tell you how to tell the story.
  4. Like
    Morangias reacted to GroggyGolem in Superpowers   
    In my opinion that sort of situation with the overpowered villain is staple to superheroics.
     
    Take Infinity War for example (again, Infinity War, not Endgame #DontSpoilTheEndgame). You don't see Spider-Man dealing much damage to Thanos with his proportionate spider strength punches and kicks. At best he's a distraction. That said, Spider-Man saved the unconscious guardians with his abilities and helped to almost remove the gauntlet from Thanos's grasp.
    Some villains (and heroes) should just be super powerful, and in that case, the weaker in combat heroes need to have other means of heroics, whether that's through fighting minions, rescuing others, using witty banter or flashy moves to distract the big bad or any other means you and your players can think up.
     
    If there still needs to be a limitation, my preference would be to look to the strain system. Every time your immortal death Knight reduces damage through their abilities, they suffer 2 strain. Sure they are nearly immortal but eventually they will run out of stamina and pass out. Superman, Wolverine, Luke Cage, even Hulk are all incredibly durable characters but none of them are depicted as having infinite stamina. Superman eventually uses up his solar energy and takes damage from villains attacks, wolverine can be knocked out regularly, Hulk gets tired and turns back into Banner, Luke Cage also gets knocked out on occasion.
     
  5. Like
    Morangias reacted to arithine in Novel writing tool turned campaign organizer   
    I wasn't sure where to post this, but since I'm also doing this to show off a little I figure here should be fine.
    There's this program Quoll Writer I've been using to do my writing for quite some time now. When it was time to get to work on my first campaign it was only natural for me to try using it to write it up... I didn't realize just how well it would work. I've been using features I've never used before to get things all sorts of organized.

     
    There's still some notes scattered about elsewhere I need to transfer over, but it's turning out nicely. If anyone is interested I might post an outline project with all the custom categories for Genesys. Extras is mostly for minions and the like, but I don't like restricting myself too much so it also houses small side characters.
  6. Like
    Morangias reacted to Watercolour Dragon in Nice one FFG   
    Good to see FFG's Genesys books doing really well on DriveThru in it's 100 hottest titles:
    Android Shadow of the Beanstalk is in top spot at number one
    Genesys at number 30
    and Realms of Terrinoth at number 41:
    https://www.drivethrurpg.com/top_100.php
    as of 00:26 BST 3 April '19
     
  7. Like
    Morangias reacted to DarthGM in Question regarding talents like 'Counteroffer'   
    It has it's place. I'm not sure I'd ever let a player stagger a target with a successful Negotiation check without this talent. Make them hesitate and apply Setback dice, sure. Maybe I'd let them stagger a target with a Triumph on a success, but get them to swap sides mid-fight without there being a plot reason to do so? No way.
    That's the other thing about this talent; you can use it on any non-Nemesis, any time. Dude-who-has-no-reason-to-change-sides, your GM might allow it.
    And that's the key part...
    Your GM is giving you zero assurances that you can get your opponent to change sides, even with a Triumph. That's still the GMs call on a case by case basis. But making your opponent lose their next action, once per session? As a Tier 2 talent? That can be clutch.
  8. Like
    Morangias reacted to HappyDaze in Cybernetic Hardpoints   
    While I can see some cybernetics having hard points (mainly structural replacements like cyber limbs and eyes), I don't think hard points for g-mods makes much sense.
  9. Like
    Morangias reacted to thedonnie in Need Input on a Talent - Ox Body Technique   
    That is what I thought too and why I came to this thread. lol
  10. Like
    Morangias reacted to Sturn in Rivals Casting Spells   
    I think the Genesys magical system is meant to be house ruled. Each campaign world could have a different magical setting, source of power, method of casting spells, etc. The Genesys book gives a good base system that I think you should be tweaking to your own liking/campaign.
    So, unless there is something in the nature of magic in your world that causes actual physical wounds to non-heroic spellcasters, house rule it away. 
  11. Like
    Morangias reacted to c__beck in Magic rules clarification   
    Yes, you do. There is nothing in the magic section that would indicate otherwise.
    For example, blast says you the attack gains the blast quality with a rating of your Knowledge. The rules for Blast are on page 86. It's an active quality, and "[a]ctive qualities require [2 advantage] to activate…."
    Thus, qualities added require advantages to activate (unless specified otherwise, like autofire).
  12. Like
    Morangias got a reaction from Ni Fang in You know you're playing Rogue Trader when…   
    That's exactly what I was getting at. It's the paradox of the Rogue Trader's existence - you get all the wealth and power available to a mortal man in the galaxy, yet can't exercise any of it without having those three guys (and hopefully their cadres) around. Everything else is replacable.
     
    Mind, the particular guys holding these positions are also perfectly replacable, an important thing all four should remember when setting up their mutual relations.
     
    Back to the topic:
     
    -Your Missionary knows and preaches a thousand different and mutually exclusive doctrines, yet his faith is somehow unwavering enough to still grant him holy powers.
     
    -Your response to anything or anyone of importance being destroyed/killed is "Gentlemen, we can rebuild it, we have the technology".
     
    -The Kroot in the Expanse know you by a name that translates into "Master of the All-You-Can-Eat-Buffet". Somehow, that really acts as a honorific, and you're well past wondering why.
     
    -You specifically hire Vindicare assassins to date Eldar Farseers and the Officio just rolls with it because of how much you're paying.
     
    -You count food by planets, mineral riches by mines, and military assets by factoriums.
     
    -All your weapons run on Schrodinger ammo - it's always there unless the GM asks about it.
  13. Like
    Morangias got a reaction from Ni Fang in You know you're playing Rogue Trader when…   
    -You hire Space Marines to do your dirty work...
     
    -...not because they can do a better job than your elite assault troops after the Explorator finishes outfitting them, but because they're actually cheaper.
     
    -What you call "personal entourage" others call "raiding party" at best, "invasion force" at worst.
     
    -You requisition a mass conveyor starship just to carry your gold...
     
    -...and another one for people who count your gold.
     
    -Upon learning that the act of ownership of a profitable mining world was "misplaced" somewhere in your archives, you shrug and buy yourself another one.
     
    -You tip people for more than their businesses are worth...
     
    -...yet they still hate it when you arrive because apparently you can't have a nice dinner without something happening that necessitates bombarding the restaurant with melta-rockets.
     
    -You execute people for not ironing your gala outfit just perfectly, yet have no qualms dealing with hardcore recidivists and borderline heretics.
     
    -High Fabricators of prestigious Forge Worlds petition your Explorator for the right to use his superior facilities.
     
    -Inquisitors and Lords Dragon wish they had as efficient a spy network as your Seneshal.
     
    -That Deathwatch Kill-Marine you "borrowed" for a particularly nasty job doesn't want to leave after you casually outfitted him with a set of relic armaments and weaponry, and a Terminator armor for good measure.
     
    -Archbishops weep upon seeing your personal reliquary.
     
    -The secretive death cult hiding in your ship's bilge traces it's roots to the days when your ship flew in the Great Crusade. You still think of them as annoying pests.
     
    -For all your wealth and ridiculous equipment, your endeavors are still 100% dependent on a needy three-eyed mutant, an insane blind old man and a cyborg dressed in red.
  14. Like
    Morangias got a reaction from eltom13 in These Forums are starting to feel like the Askellon Sector LOL   
    That's the easiest one, just put all exp into offensive Talents and let the Emperor be your shield
  15. Like
    Morangias got a reaction from Robin Graves in These Forums are starting to feel like the Askellon Sector LOL   
    That's the easiest one, just put all exp into offensive Talents and let the Emperor be your shield
  16. Like
    Morangias reacted to Robin Graves in Assassinorum Infiltration/Exfiltration?   
    Normal assassin: use stealth to remain unseen.
     
    Eversor assassin: kill all the witnesses.
  17. Like
    Morangias reacted to MorbidDon in These Forums are starting to feel like the Askellon Sector LOL   
    But but my glass cannon?! LMFAO
  18. Like
    Morangias got a reaction from Azraiel in These Forums are starting to feel like the Askellon Sector LOL   
    As an aside - there are few games with greater need for optimization than the White Wolf ones, as they are some of the few games where you can accidentally create a completely useless character.
     
    More to the point, it's not that 40k in general or DH2 in specific have no place for build optimization, it's more that the optimal strategies are generally well-known by now (as most of them were optimal from the days of DH1) and that the Aptitude-based character advancement makes it exceedingly easy to prioritize the acquisition of the most optimal traits, thus making optimization too simple for in-depth discussions.
  19. Like
    Morangias reacted to venkelos in "Skin-Armour" and the dislike for it?   
    Personally, I've often viewed it as the "heroic scale" aspect 40k likes, so much. Also, it's nice to know you'll have that extra bit of defense, at the beginning, when you start fighting Orks who don't die, or Nids that can tear you in half; sort of help make the character last longer than the build time was, barring stupid choices. Different situations would have different people react differently to the same trauma, like getting impaled by a bayonet, or jumping on the grenade for your friends, and some still live through these events, even wearing the refrigerator boxes IG get, or less, if you are Catachan. I'm not sure all of these can be waived with random damage, or max health, especially the latter, as one rarely has much health (20+ is often high for important, non Astartes/monstrous NPCs). I don't have any first hand experience with it, so I'm mostly just talking, but it seems like a good way to make the really durable things, that basically have armored skin (Orks), weather the storm better. Or, you could just let Pen go through it; I probably would.
  20. Like
    Morangias got a reaction from Vorzakk in "Skin-Armour" and the dislike for it?   
    Regarding the first point, DoS as minimum damage value, Accurate or any other rule you'd care to cite don't change the simple fact that the ultimate gauge of your attack's effectiveness is how many points of damage it deals after all calculations. Everything that comes before is but a factor for this final calculation.
     
    Regarding the other point, I find 40k's degree of lethality perfect for the kinds of games I'm running with the system, so I disagree that there's any "problem" with the system in that regard.
     
    Regarding the first point, this is something of a known issue with the game's abstraction - I remember this argument being brought up in the days of WFRP 2e, and I'm betting it was around even earlier, as this aspect of the system has barely changed since first introduced in WFRP 1e.
     
    Stil, consider this: a significant number of critical effects at one point of critical damage speak of "grazing" or "glancing blows". Logically, it follows that any attack that doesn't deal critical damage (or trigger Righteous Fury) cannot be described as more damaging than that.
     
    Regarding the second point... I'm sorry, but I've never understood the need for realism in a setting containing space wizards, undead Egyptian robots and things yet sillier. The combat system is perfect for recreating the kind of combat encounters your usual 80's action hero would partake in - which is perfect given 40k's range of inspirations. Tough guys survive stuff that kills less tough guys, that's the gist of it.
  21. Like
    Morangias reacted to MorbidDon in "Skin-Armour" and the dislike for it?   
    Its a matter of pulp verses realism > if you want a "virtualized" RPG experience may I suggest picking up the Traveler RPG and a calculator LOL...
     
    In this vein Fantasy Flight went with a Pulp approach
     
    That means - don't be soo literal in your interpretations of the math > if bolter round hits and human is still "up" its up to GM to describe the how and why of said attack...
     
    Honestly then "Helpless" would equal > pow bang your dead = no rolls neccessary
  22. Like
    Morangias got a reaction from Asymptomatic in "Skin-Armour" and the dislike for it?   
    The notion of "skin armor" is a consequence of people treating an attack roll and a damage roll as two sequential but separate events in the game's narrative, rather than a single event with a two-step system for determining the outcome. 
     
    Nobody's actually deflecting bolts with their oiled pecs - if the shot hits but does minimal/no damage, it wasn't a clear hit, no matter what the attack roll tells you.
  23. Like
    Morangias got a reaction from Vorzakk in "Skin-Armour" and the dislike for it?   
    The notion of "skin armor" is a consequence of people treating an attack roll and a damage roll as two sequential but separate events in the game's narrative, rather than a single event with a two-step system for determining the outcome. 
     
    Nobody's actually deflecting bolts with their oiled pecs - if the shot hits but does minimal/no damage, it wasn't a clear hit, no matter what the attack roll tells you.
  24. Like
    Morangias reacted to KommissarK in "Skin-Armour" and the dislike for it?   
    I mean, Inquisitor Obiwan Sherlock Clousseau's "skin tight powered armour" is a staple of the 40k setting after all.
  25. Like
    Morangias got a reaction from TheWorldSmith in "Skin-Armour" and the dislike for it?   
    The notion of "skin armor" is a consequence of people treating an attack roll and a damage roll as two sequential but separate events in the game's narrative, rather than a single event with a two-step system for determining the outcome. 
     
    Nobody's actually deflecting bolts with their oiled pecs - if the shot hits but does minimal/no damage, it wasn't a clear hit, no matter what the attack roll tells you.
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