Jump to content

Congzilla

Members
  • Content Count

    83
  • Joined

  • Last visited

    Never

Everything posted by Congzilla

  1. Commoner, that is great example of mechanics and story / roleplaying working together, which is one of 3e's strengths in my opinion. I had a nice line showing the falacy of the huge paragraph above it but the one below made it all worth reading so I won't bother.
  2. I just emailed the owner of my FLGS to offer to run it for all three days.
  3. Llanwyre said: Mal Reynolds said: Someone (maybe FFG) should make an travelling guide, including natural hazards of the Empire, small encounters at the road, and the like. If you could throw in an encounter or 2 per journey, travelling would be more interesting.... It would be awesome if they released it as a straight-to-PDF mini-guide for a few dollars so that we didn't have to wait for it to come out as part of a bigger supplement. I wouldn't mind seeing that. It would be nice is they put an expanded version of it in a World supplement. I really want to see a world supplement with maps and all the fluff of the old 1e and 2e D&D campaign boxed settings. The old Forgotten realms one came with a transparency to overlay the world may with a mileage grid as well as cards showing the standard caravan formations. Stuff like that made running overland and travel scenes fun.
  4. commoner said: Any statement made by anyone is a matter of opinion, period. Doesn't matter what it is...saying the earth is round regardless of how many people say it is still just an opinion. Um, that just doesn't make any sense. "An opinion is a subjective statement or thought about an issue or topic, and is the result of emotion or interpretation of facts. An opinion may be supported by an argument, although people may draw opposing opinions from the same set of facts. Opinions rarely change without new arguments being presented. However, it can be reasoned that one opinion is better supported by the facts than another by analysing the supporting arguments." If I say I have 10 fingers, or that WFRP comes in a card board box I am stating a fact not an opinion. If everything was an opinion no one would have bothered inventing the word 'fact'. "The word fact can refer to verified information about past or present circumstances or events which are presented as objective reality. In science, it means a provable concept." Stating the Earth is round is a fact since it is a provable concept. If some one played enough games of WFRP 2e and 3e with a set group of test subjects, they could theoretically prove as fact that one plays faster than the other. They could never prove one is better or more fun than the other since that would be a subjective statement otherwise known as an opinion.
  5. Peacekeeper_b said: Congzilla said: Peacekeeper_b said: for the type of role players we are, which is the generation of role players who dont need fancy dice, doo dads and scales to run a fun enjoyable game. Don't fall off that high horse, we wouldn't want to see you bruise your ego. Sorry for sounding so arrogant. Wasnt the intention. Was just replying to Commoner's statement that the 3E was far superior than 1E/2E/40KRPGs and was trying to state that "this statement was a matter of opinion, the same as my group's opinion that 2E/40KRPG are better than the new bells and whistles." Believe me I understand that everyone has their own tastes and favorites. For me, I like the simplicity of not using cards and special dice. And to me they are new-fangled devices (didnt have them with my for red box of D&D, thus in my old cranky mind they are new LOL). I just dont like absolutes. I prefer to see things like "In my opinion" or "from what we have seen". And so forth. I can agree with that. I started with the same red box set, crayon and all, so I know where your coming from. There is no right or wrong way to play make believe. For me the fun of WFRP 3e is simply that it is a new fresh way to play make believe. I have been impressed for the most part by how quickly the components fall to the background once everyone at the table understands them. In the begining I would have to help everyone build their dice pool and explain converting stance die, now I simply say make a 2d strength check and they know that by 2d I mean 2 challenge dice. Or if I say a 1 by 2 agility check they know I mean 1 challenge and 2 misfortune. Some things on the DM side I have found easier to track with pencil and paper like monster HP, 15 tokens piled on a card gets hard to count. I play a lot of games and every system has ups and down, non are perfect. This one has a lot going for it, to me it allows real old school character centric roleplaying more so than any system since the old Dragonlance SAGA system. I shouldn't say allows it, roleplaying isn't effected by system, but it seems more built around it.
  6. Gallows said: I have a rule that allows players to parry/block for other allies in the same engagement. This makes tanks more useful for the group as whole and less focused on just being a turtle themselves. It's beautiful I f you have a good rule for it you should post it in the House Rules section so we can all check it out.
  7. Llanwyre said: Hah. I can't imagine not reading the whole thing first! I read the whole thing a few times, in fact, and then have re-read each individual section twice, taking notes, before I run that section. I can't stand having to stop the flow of narrative to look details up, but at the same time, I don't want to forget anything cool. But maybe that's just me being crazy. I am the same way, but the older I get the less time I have to do it. It would be nice if the printed adventures had a synopsis and flow chart. More maps wouldn't hurt either I am having trouble visualizing the layout for the Garden of Morr section for example.
  8. ffgfan said: I'm made my sheet for players in Word. Easy to fill out, easy to print and it opens on every computer. And the most importent thing it has all what I want it to have, here's a list: Name, Nickname, Race, Birthplace, Known Languages, Faith, Age, Height, Weight, Hair Color, Eye Color, original tables for: Characteristics, Basic Skills, Advanced Skills, Specialisations, Special Abilities, Equipment (Weapons, Armor and basic equipment), Money, Encumbrance, Critical Wounds, Insanities, Stance, Adversaries and General Career Advances (2 tables for 2 careers). Also I made place for Card Inventory and a place for the drawings (if the player would like to make portrait of his hero). This all on one A4 two-sided sheet. I'm pround of it. PS. I made this sheet for my players so it's in polish but works well. PS2. I added all the thing that I missed from the previous versions of WFRP. Don't be a tease, linky please .
  9. Correct, we should all still be placing pewter figurines in initiative order and trying to figure out Thac0.
  10. Nifft said: It's kind of painful playing with no divine or arcane support. The party I GM is finding this as well. But without the material being out for them it is hard to want to go those routes.
  11. Silverwave said: That's actually a good idea. I'm playing from time to time simple little sessions with my gf and I'm always struggling to find ideas for some short adventure. That may be a good start. You could also do the following : Draw a career card to generate a NPC. Draw 1 insanity (y'know... almost all NPCs in WH are a bit insane ) or a wound card and turn it over for critical (an old war wound or something). Isn't anyone thinking about a way to generate random investigation plot with this method? My gf loves to investigate in this game (she really liked the an Eye for an Eye adventure) and try to find clues that point to "the culprit". I do a lot of adventures with just my wife as well. I actually wrote out an entire D&D 4e Eberron campaign for us to do, its been great to play but putting it together was a nightmare. Also, it is very railroaded. A lot goes into putting together a D&D adventure and it is hard to free form. I like your insanity idea, you could also do the same with effects and even critical wounds. I'll have to mess around and see if I can find a couple consistent numbers of different types of cards to combine for different adventure sizes. Speaking of adventures - que rant - , and this goes to books in general for WFRP 3e but for the example I am refering to The Gathering Storm. The editing is bad, actually it sucks. Some people don't have time to read the whole 90 pages before running part of it. But when you don't tell me something I need to know for the first adventure out of four until the second it can totally put the GM in a corner.
  12. Silverwave said: Congzilla said: Sure it needs rules. If someone says he "blocks the first strike with his shield pushing it aside", it is obviously great narratively, but I as a GM need to know what it means mechanically as well. I meant, I don't need this rule to specify wether I'm blocking, evading, parying, making a side step, rolling, or whatnot. Yes, I need a rule to help me defend against an attack, but I would have liked it much more if I were able to decide, depending the situation, what is my defensive action. Well if one of those cards you named wouldn't work for what you want to do, wouldn't the "Perform a Stunt"?
  13. Silverwave said: lystrapitts said: Having multiple active defenses is cool. Think about it this way. You're watching a movie, the hero doesn't just parry every blow that comes at him does he? No he blocks the first strike with his shield pushing it aside, then whirls around ducking under the next attack dodging certain death, barely bringing up his sword in time to parry the cut aimed at his head. My characters love calling out how they are evading the enemy. It helps tell the story of the fight so much better than I use "defense" to stop the attack. Isn't this what we call narration? It doen't need rules. But, well, yes it can help you, as you stated. Sure it needs rules. If someone says he "blocks the first strike with his shield pushing it aside", it is obviously great narratively, but I as a GM need to know what it means mechanically as well.
  14. The cards in this game actually are a great random adventure / encounter generator in themselves. Take the location card dec shuffle it up and draw three random locations. Take the item dec shuffle it up and draw a random item card. Whala you have the setting and goal, add some NPC's ( picking a couple random career cards could do this for you) and some monsters and your good to go. If you want the bad guys connected to a larger organization the same could be done with the nemesis card dec. Once you have those pieces laid out connecting them should be fairly simple. If you want to get fancy or don't like to wing it add some canned dialog to set the scene and provide the hooks. This system lends itself well to free form games and letting PC's go off on whatever tangent they want. If they flounder at the hooks or can't decide what to do just ratchet up that party tension meter until they get the hint. My group is getting ready to go from Eye for an Eye to The Gathering Storm, and after reading TGS there are just so many places this adventure can be expanded upon or used as a stepping stone to additional adventures which is what got me thinking of how to easily add in additional content on the fly. Anyone else tried anything like this yet?
  15. Peacekeeper_b said: for the type of role players we are, which is the generation of role players who dont need fancy dice, doo dads and scales to run a fun enjoyable game. Don't fall off that high horse, we wouldn't want to see you bruise your ego.
  16. Would be nice to see it formatted the same size as the character sheet and laid out to be folded easy, looks like one side is a little wider than the other atm.
  17. Thinking about this some more, if it was roleplayed well and there was good thought put into the planning of it, I might allow the knocking prone to be done as a maneuver using an opposed skill check. That's why I love this systems, there are so many 'correct' options to choose from depending on the situation.
  18. I think I would requir the use of the "Perform A Stunt" card to knock someone prone, thereby making it an action. Also remember you can use multiple defense action cards in the same round at no penalty. Stress and fatigue happen, don't let your players get overly careful in avoiding them. If they do become overly careful force them to change their stance to reflect how they are actually roleplaying. Don't let a player keep their stance say 2 deep toward aggressive when it is very obvious they are playing cautiously, if they aren't playing it out they shouldn't get the bonus. As far as multiple maneuvers, I have no problem with this as long as they roleplay it out. That dwarf running from long range might be overcome with battle lust swinging his axe over head and and screaming oaths to his ancestors while the much faster elf is simply more careful in her attack positioning. Always try - "Try" - to say yes to your players as long as the action they want to attempt is reasonable, and being a fantasy game I think you will find most usually are.
  19. mcv said: Once I get my house rules in order, I'll (try to) make one that allows for more than 10 career advances. Haven't seen your house rule, but why would someone want more than 10 advances as opposed to moving into an advanced career?
  20. Having a spot for the total soak value would be nice.
  21. mcv said: Mal Reynolds said: I have to agree with Congzilla, healing surge and especially the second wind in D&D is quite similar to the rally step of WFRP. I disagree. Second Wind is an action you perform, like Assess The Situation or something like that. It's nothing like a rally step, other than that it heals you a bit. A player doesn't decide he's going to have a rally step this turn while the others continue fighting. But the more fundamental difference between rally steps and healing surges is: after the combat is over, you can spend as many healing surges as you like in order to heal back up. There's nothing remotely similar in WFRP. There's no "how many rally steps do we still have today? Let's do 5 now so that I'm completely healed." I honestly don't understand what's so confuasing about this difference. No one said there wasn't a difference, but to say they are not similar is just plain incorrect. Both mechanics are there for the same reason, to allow characters the chance to recuperate before carrying on. The finite amount of healing surges is also loosely related to fortune points which can be expended in similar ways. I honestly don't see what is so confusing about the similarity .
  22. Healing surges are usually only used during downtime if the healing power performed on you by another player causes you to use one (cleric prayers / healing potions) . Once during each encounter, you can take a standard action called a second wind; this gives you a certain amount of hit points back equal to your healing surge value and gives you a +2 bonus to all your defenses until the start of your next turn. The rules clearly state what it is supposed to represent, hence the name "second wind". A healing surge does not instantly completely heal you, you get 1/4hp back, and yes many effects and damage carry over from one encounter to the next. Honestly it is like you have never even played the game, only played RPGA, or your GM sucked.
  23. superklaus said: Doc, the Weasel said: superklaus said: Congzilla said: I just finished GMing a year and a half long 4e campaign and I simply do not agree. But this is not the 4e forums so we can leave it at that. I do believe this WFRP 3e system makes much more of an effort to be roleplaying focused than most systems, and I think it succeeds in that regard. My point was simply that a game system is what you make of it. Roleplaying is done by the players not the rules. You could easily create a campaign of high powered heroes in WFRP 3e and you can easily create a low power campaign in 4e. I am pretty sure neither system has rules for what your player says when he encounters the guard he needs to get passed or the noble he needs to sway. Both have rules for combat, very different styles of combat, and each will fit different play styles. Some people will prefer tactical combat, some will prefer it abstract, butto say one play style can offer better roleplaying than the other is nonsense. Congzilla said: I just finished GMing a year and a half long 4e campaign and I simply do not agree. But this is not the 4e forums so we can leave it at that. I do believe this WFRP 3e system makes much more of an effort to be roleplaying focused than most systems, and I think it succeeds in that regard. My point was simply that a game system is what you make of it. Roleplaying is done by the players not the rules. You could easily create a campaign of high powered heroes in WFRP 3e and you can easily create a low power campaign in 4e. I am pretty sure neither system has rules for what your player says when he encounters the guard he needs to get passed or the noble he needs to sway. Both have rules for combat, very different styles of combat, and each will fit different play styles. Some people will prefer tactical combat, some will prefer it abstract, butto say one play style can offer better roleplaying than the other is nonsense. Well nonsense maybe for you, but believe it or not in the moment you dabble around with 4e "healing surges" or encounter powers which let suddenly pop up a "cloud of daggers" from thin air and still pretend to play a low-powered campaign, each roleplayer worth his salt gives you roll-eyes. I'm glad there are superior people like this around to let us all know we are all doing it wrong ... Either that, or there are a number of different ways of playing, each with different goals and conventions, and all are legitimate as long as they provide enjoyment. Just because you personally may not game this way or that does not make one style less than another. I'm constantly amazed at how a hobby that fosters imagination and creativity harbors so many with such narrow definitions of how to properly play make-believe. Its nothing about narrow definition. Congzilla claimed that he transform 4th edition into a low-powered rpg, which is IMO impossible, except you rewrite the whole engine. I tried to proof my point by mentioning which elements are making it impossible (eg. healing surges and "magically type" powers). Additionally cutting the healing surges out means cutting out one of the core elements of the system and would lead to an weakening and invalidation of other 4e mechanics like the encounter mechanic. Maybe Congzilla has his own strange definition of "low-powered" but in MY low-powered games (and I play several types of settings ranging from low to high) healing surge mechanics which heal you between combats in only 5min would be not allowed. They are the anti-thesis of "low-powered" while healing with a more natural rate is the correct way to go for a low-powered game. Of course his claim that healing surges and rally step are similar is also wrong but I wont go into detail why. I dont have much time, English is not my native tongue so its tedious to look for the right vocabularies and thus I will now end my post. In 4e a healing surge is a narrative element with an attached game play mechanic that represents the character digging deeper within themselves and finding a way to carry on. A rally step is also a narrative element with an attached game play mechanic. Both of which allow the character to heal in some way. They are similar. The "magical type" powers only seem magical if you use their flavor text. Any of them could easily be re-flavored to fit a low power campaign. Also, it isn't hard at all to build encounters a level above the players to make them more dangerous / deadly and keep the players from appearing overpowered. Yes you have to power up the monsters and NPCs to put the players down to a commoners' level, but it is simple enough to do with the provided system without altering the engine or stripping out mechanics.
×
×
  • Create New...