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Kirov

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    Kirov got a reaction from Bram Stoker in Moritat Assassin and Power Weapons   
    Macharias the Mendicant said:
     
    Seeing as the Moritat believe in the purity of the blade and choose to spill the blood of their enemies when they fight,would you consider Power Weapons (swords, specifically in this case) to count as weapons which the Moritat Assassin would avoid or would you consider them? As per the Bloody Edge restriction, a WP test at -20 must be made to use "forbidden' weapons unless it is plain that their "regular" attacks are ineffective.
    So far, we'd assumed that most weapons which were bladed and had damage type of Rending would gain the tearing quality as per The Bloody Edge and would therefore be okay to use. In the case of Power Swords we're not sure. I'm inclined to think a Moritat can use a Power Sword no problem and benefit from their Bloody Edge power with it (and not have to roll WP) but I also feel like, in the spirit of the purity of the cult, such weapons might be eschewed in favour of good ol' steel (or Lathe weapons and may in fact be viewed as weapons of last resort. (Perhaps those who own Power Swords choose to fight with them "switched off" and then only activate the field if their attacks are otherwise ineffective.)
    Thoughts?
    (That just made me think about the best sword ever: a Lathe Blade converted into a Power Sword... My assassin now has a new goal in life - get chummy with the tech priest and get one of these!!!)
     
     
    This question was debated to high heaven and was on the verge of violence in several instances until someone from FFG was consulted. The final ruling was that while Moritat could indeed use Power Weapons (with a power field actively on) without having to make the Willpower test, they do not get the benefit of Tearing while the power field was active. I don't remember the full reasoning behind it, so if I find the original thread, I'll link it.
    -Kirov
    Addendum: found the relevant thread here. Look for the replies by FFG_Sam_Stewart
  2. Like
    Kirov got a reaction from SCKoNi in Gear Advancement and the Inquisition   
    While there is no hard and fast rule about what to give out when, I can at least say a few additional things on the matter:
     
    1. Exotic ammunition (manstopper rounds, dumdum bullets, etc.) should generally be restricted in some way. For example, manstopper rounds should generally not be readily available as it invalidates other weapon choices (typically lasguns). In my group, we had to acquire such rounds with our own funds, which meant that filling up that autopistol or autorifle with manstopper rounds was typically not an option; usually, only hunting rifles and handcannons were loaded with them.
     
    2. Some extra leeway should be given to guardsman characters as their base income is generally pretty low. If need be, the guardsman should justify to their inquisitor exactly why they need certain pieces of equipment. For example, my guardsman character, a combat engineer, initially asked for and was granted a melta cutter for cutting through doors and other obstacles. As the threats facing the party increased, the melta cutter was traded in for a thermal lance.
     
    3. The sort of threats that you send against the party will determine to some degree what equipment the group acquires. If the group is always facing massed gangs of unarmored cultists, for example, it makes little sense to waste valuable and expensive boltgun rounds on them when a lasgun or autogun will suffice.
  3. Like
    Kirov got a reaction from Superraiderman in How do you Balance Psykers?   
    ragnro2004 said:
    Two side notes also, does anyone feel with SP weapons getting the fire selecter and most getting full auto that besides reliable they really are better weapons than the Las weapons? and secondly when starting at say 4 or 5 how do you handle the characters wealth?

    You are making the assumption that ammunition for the autogun (including the specialty rounds) will always be readily available and easily obtained. Try dropping the group into the middle of nowhere and facing constant combat (like a death world with lots of hostile fauna) and with strictly limited ammunition supplies. Suddenly, those lasguns with their solar rechargeable power packs don't look so bad any more.
    Also note that specialty rounds are significantly more expensive than their regular counterparts. Take manstopper rounds, for example. In my group, we had to provide for ourselves using our salaries only, especially early on. Manstopper rounds costing as much as they do made it highly impractical to load them in substantial quantity, and as a result, the only weapons that typically got loaded with them were the handcannons.
    As far as resources for higher-ranked starting characters goes, check the sidebar "It's a Hard Life" on page 29 of the core rulebook. It is advisable to be flexible on the issue as the widely varying salaries of different types of characters may cause problems.
    -Kirov
  4. Like
    Kirov got a reaction from Magnus Grendel in Glorified Bodyguard PCs (GM ranting)   
    It seems I'm rather late to the party. Nonetheless, I offer the following to the original poster:
     
    I once asked my DnD 3.5 group if they've seen anybody else besides me take the Leadership feat or otherwise go out of their way to acquire minions/allies in other systems. Their answer was "no", and this was despite just how much help an extra set of helping hands can be, something that I proved time and again in the current campaign (do not underestimate the power of a coordinated attack, even when the character partnered with you isn't as high level as you). Heck, even a good contact can be a MASSIVE help, something that I demonstrated in my second Dark Heresy campaign where I spent 190 XP to acquire a reliable armorsmith contact (and let me tell you that that was a major sacrifice on my part as the GM only awarded on average maybe 50 XP per session). Not only was everybody able to get better armor and enjoy increased survivability in the trials that came later, our Inquisitor (yes, our boss) went and got some better armor made for himself, too, especially after suffering some debilitating injuries going toe-to-toe with a greater Slaaneshi daemon.
     
    So what's the deal? Why do so many players seem to ignore this option even though it can make the entire group's life so much easier? Well, I think my GM's answer perhaps explains all: players (a large number of them, anyway) are only interested in personal, individual power. That is, they're only interested in abilities that will personally allow them to turn their next opponent into red paste that much more quickly. Anything else is pretty much ignored.
     
    As for how to change that behavior? Well, one thing that I can say is that a given player group will tend to equip themselves according to the threats they keep facing. For example, in my first Dark Heresy campaign, we never bothered with trying to get meltas, bolters, or heck, even large amounts of specialist stubber ammo, and all because of the very large groups (20-50 individuals, typically) of virtually unarmored cultists we kept having to fight. Not only would the expensive ammo not have been worth it for such peons, but the small magazine capacities of the bolters and meltas (and to a lesser extent, slug-throwing guns) would have made reloading frequently a dicey proposition at best. In a Rogue Trader campaign, then, try throwing a boarding action or two or otherwise create a situation where having lots of extra friends around is more beneficial than being able to splatter a single opponent in one turn rather than two. Hopefully, when the self-aggrandising character ends up burning fate point because it was going to take 50 turns to kill that entire group of Orks all the while said Orks were shooting at him, he'll get a clue.
     
    -Kirov, who plans on asking for counter-espionage agents-turned-wait staff the next time he gets a chance to play Rogue Trader
  5. Like
    Kirov got a reaction from Wincent in Glorified Bodyguard PCs (GM ranting)   
    It seems I'm rather late to the party. Nonetheless, I offer the following to the original poster:
     
    I once asked my DnD 3.5 group if they've seen anybody else besides me take the Leadership feat or otherwise go out of their way to acquire minions/allies in other systems. Their answer was "no", and this was despite just how much help an extra set of helping hands can be, something that I proved time and again in the current campaign (do not underestimate the power of a coordinated attack, even when the character partnered with you isn't as high level as you). Heck, even a good contact can be a MASSIVE help, something that I demonstrated in my second Dark Heresy campaign where I spent 190 XP to acquire a reliable armorsmith contact (and let me tell you that that was a major sacrifice on my part as the GM only awarded on average maybe 50 XP per session). Not only was everybody able to get better armor and enjoy increased survivability in the trials that came later, our Inquisitor (yes, our boss) went and got some better armor made for himself, too, especially after suffering some debilitating injuries going toe-to-toe with a greater Slaaneshi daemon.
     
    So what's the deal? Why do so many players seem to ignore this option even though it can make the entire group's life so much easier? Well, I think my GM's answer perhaps explains all: players (a large number of them, anyway) are only interested in personal, individual power. That is, they're only interested in abilities that will personally allow them to turn their next opponent into red paste that much more quickly. Anything else is pretty much ignored.
     
    As for how to change that behavior? Well, one thing that I can say is that a given player group will tend to equip themselves according to the threats they keep facing. For example, in my first Dark Heresy campaign, we never bothered with trying to get meltas, bolters, or heck, even large amounts of specialist stubber ammo, and all because of the very large groups (20-50 individuals, typically) of virtually unarmored cultists we kept having to fight. Not only would the expensive ammo not have been worth it for such peons, but the small magazine capacities of the bolters and meltas (and to a lesser extent, slug-throwing guns) would have made reloading frequently a dicey proposition at best. In a Rogue Trader campaign, then, try throwing a boarding action or two or otherwise create a situation where having lots of extra friends around is more beneficial than being able to splatter a single opponent in one turn rather than two. Hopefully, when the self-aggrandising character ends up burning fate point because it was going to take 50 turns to kill that entire group of Orks all the while said Orks were shooting at him, he'll get a clue.
     
    -Kirov, who plans on asking for counter-espionage agents-turned-wait staff the next time he gets a chance to play Rogue Trader
  6. Like
    Kirov got a reaction from Sebastian Yorke in Glorified Bodyguard PCs (GM ranting)   
    It seems I'm rather late to the party. Nonetheless, I offer the following to the original poster:
     
    I once asked my DnD 3.5 group if they've seen anybody else besides me take the Leadership feat or otherwise go out of their way to acquire minions/allies in other systems. Their answer was "no", and this was despite just how much help an extra set of helping hands can be, something that I proved time and again in the current campaign (do not underestimate the power of a coordinated attack, even when the character partnered with you isn't as high level as you). Heck, even a good contact can be a MASSIVE help, something that I demonstrated in my second Dark Heresy campaign where I spent 190 XP to acquire a reliable armorsmith contact (and let me tell you that that was a major sacrifice on my part as the GM only awarded on average maybe 50 XP per session). Not only was everybody able to get better armor and enjoy increased survivability in the trials that came later, our Inquisitor (yes, our boss) went and got some better armor made for himself, too, especially after suffering some debilitating injuries going toe-to-toe with a greater Slaaneshi daemon.
     
    So what's the deal? Why do so many players seem to ignore this option even though it can make the entire group's life so much easier? Well, I think my GM's answer perhaps explains all: players (a large number of them, anyway) are only interested in personal, individual power. That is, they're only interested in abilities that will personally allow them to turn their next opponent into red paste that much more quickly. Anything else is pretty much ignored.
     
    As for how to change that behavior? Well, one thing that I can say is that a given player group will tend to equip themselves according to the threats they keep facing. For example, in my first Dark Heresy campaign, we never bothered with trying to get meltas, bolters, or heck, even large amounts of specialist stubber ammo, and all because of the very large groups (20-50 individuals, typically) of virtually unarmored cultists we kept having to fight. Not only would the expensive ammo not have been worth it for such peons, but the small magazine capacities of the bolters and meltas (and to a lesser extent, slug-throwing guns) would have made reloading frequently a dicey proposition at best. In a Rogue Trader campaign, then, try throwing a boarding action or two or otherwise create a situation where having lots of extra friends around is more beneficial than being able to splatter a single opponent in one turn rather than two. Hopefully, when the self-aggrandising character ends up burning fate point because it was going to take 50 turns to kill that entire group of Orks all the while said Orks were shooting at him, he'll get a clue.
     
    -Kirov, who plans on asking for counter-espionage agents-turned-wait staff the next time he gets a chance to play Rogue Trader
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