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Thulis

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  1. Thank you all for the advice. Much appreciated!! I'm pretty sure I'm going to be going with a modified version of Forsaken Bounty as the con game. Hopefully it goes well.
  2. Hi all, I have recently been asked to run a Rogue Trader game at a local convention. Its only about a week and a half away, 4.5 hour slot. I've never run or played in a game at a convention before so I'm not really sure what to expect. I've been told it would be open to up to 6 players. There are the no-brainers - I'll need my books, dice, an adventure, a group of pregen characters. What else? Any advice or tips from those more experienced on how to make the game run smoothly and make sure everyone has a good time?
  3. tygre said: To me it doesn't make much sense that using a ships weapons requires a Ballistic Skill Test. Shooting a personal weapon is a matter of hand eye co-ordination and similar related skills. But using ship weapons does not use those skills. When a ship shoots isn't it more a matter of judgement, using the ships sensors to determine predict the targets location, and then choosing the right fire pattern with this information. With this reasoning wouldn't a Challenging (+0) Scrutiny+Detection Test be more appropriate. I look forward to hearing your thoughts. Completely agree with this. Ship-based weapons are a completely different beast from hand-helds. Just because you're great at firing a pistol doesn't mean you'd do well at firing a broadside macrobattery. Believe it or not, I actually play using the exact rules that you mention and it seems to work a lot better. Also frees up arch-militant types to get their hands dirty by repelling boarding parties/conduct hit-and-runs or generally just command the troops. As a work around to the problem of not everyone being able to take scrutiny, I allow people who don't have the skill to either buy it as an elite advance or use the skill untrained. -Thulis
  4. NGL said: I always just assumed it was an inspirational thing. The rogue trader is able to get more out of people then they believe themselves capable of because that's just what good leaders do. In the combat situation its reasonable that the rogue trader could be checking in with him. "So Ted, how's that door thing coming along?" "Oh you know its coming..." "Well, if you don't get it open soon you can kiss that bottle of amsec I promised you goodbye. Cause you know we'll all be DEAD!" "No pressure or anything. Right?" "You know what Ted? Next time you're fighting the Orks and I am opening the door. How would you like that?" +10 security -click- "I got it! Its open!" "I never doubted you for a second Ted." Keeping in mind that all this would occur as a Free Action? Again, the ability isn't a huge deal... I've run a campaign or two and half the time my players forgot about it. But in some of the situations where they did remember and they used it, it made absolutely no sense.
  5. Hi all, Question for you regarding Rogue Traders - specifically, their special ability to once per round as a free action give a +10 bonus to an ally that can see or hear them. What do you all think of this ability? The reason I ask is that it seems a bit ridiculous. Although I 100% agree with it being suitable during strategic turns with starship combat, its kind of nuts during regular gameplay. For example, an explorator is trying to recall what a certain xenos species is using Forbidden Lore (Xenos) - a skill his Rogue Trader does not possess. How does the RT give the +10 bonus?! Chanting "You can do it!"? Or another example, in the middle of combat, the RT is fighting in melee against an ork, doing his best not to get killed while his seneschal tries to get a blast door open some 20 meters away. How does the RT grant him the +10 bonus? I'd just like your thoughts on this ability and to see if any of you have modified it in any way. Like I say, I think its highly appropriate in regards to starship combat, strategic turns, etc. Also, please forgive me if I've misinterpreted anything - at work right now and don't have access to my books. -Thulis
  6. Hi all, Recently had a bit of a debate with my players and I'd like your opinion on something. The issue was with the stern chase rules in the main RT book. Though these rules seem good for one ship chasing another through rough terrain (i.e. nebula or asteroid belt) they make absolutely no sense in the void (extremely long distances in a straight line). The degrees of success seem to be based primarily around the type of ship you're chasing with only a relatively small modifier for the speeds of the ships. Shouldn't it be the other way around? For instance: The PCs have an orion class star clipper - speed 10, transport hull. They're chasing a havoc-class merchant raider - speed 9, raider hull. They need 7 degrees of success for chasing a raider, but -2 for being faster, for a grand total of 5 degrees of success. If they're in rough terrain, as mentioned above, I can totally see this making sense. But say they're in void space, heading towards the edge of the system, trying to catch the ship before it jumps to the warp... shouldn't they automatically catch it? In a different scenario, let's try something different: The PCs are in a jericho class pilgrim vessel - speed 3, transport. They're trying to catch a Hazeroth class privateer - speed 10, raider. They need 7 DoS for raider, +2 DoS as its faster than them. Wait, what? Its not just faster than them, its over three times as fast! Only +2 DoS? Shouldn't the hazeroth automatically be able to outrun them? The thing is, people say "Well, you need 9 degrees of success - that's pretty hard and not too likely". As we all know, players can make pretty **** powerful characters if they put their minds to it. 9 DoS is not that tough with a couple good rolls and a good navigator or voidmaster. I understand the system, but scenarios like this tend to resemble chasing a formula one racer, on an open track, with a horse, and CATCHING it. So, my questions are: Has anyone had similar experiences with the stern chase rules? How have you dealt with them or explained them? Are there any alternate rules for starship chases that make a bit more sense? Any information would be greatly appreciated! -Thulis
  7. crisaron said: Adam France said: crisaron said: If I remember correctly the second most popular army (the 1st being marines) is Orks fantasy and 40k together. An awful lot of 8 to 12 year olds play the tt game. The ones that stick with the game will grow out of their Ork faze, moving on to Space Wolves, then another army. I think You have this one wrong... KIDs love the Puppys! It usually the old timer geek Kobol coders who like Orks! Not a cobol coder, but Orks were my first army and still my main army. And I'm 32... not a little kiddie. Crisaron is right though, most ork players I've run across are older. Like my age or older. You want younger players, you look for space wolf and blood angel players. Not all, but a good chunk are kiddies. -Thulis
  8. IMHO, Orks fit perfectly fine in 40k. A few things you need to remember though. When encountering them, don’t have them talking in broken English in a cockney accent. The PCs should see what are essentially gigantic green gorillas wielding knifes and chainswords the size of a grown man and firing guns with bullets more fitting a bolter or autocannon, screaming at the top of their lungs. With their resilience, PCs firing lasguns and other small arms at them should do next to no damage. They’re actually pretty scary when done right. In my old campaign, one of the PCs first encounters was against orks… not a small group but a pretty decent sized horde. They had brought a large contingent of troops along with their ship, saw the orks coming and basically thought “Ok, here comes the comic relief”. They took up firing positions, didn’t seem too concerned, and started blasting away with lasguns, and the occasional heavy weapon (heavy bolters). The bolters did wonders, but there weren’t enough of them. Plus, as a bastard, I added a shokk attack gun into the mix. The PCs had to take fear tests when about a dozen of there troops suddenly were swarmed/fused with hundreds of insane snotlings and torn apart. They had to retreat and quickly learned why the orks are the major threat that they are in the galaxy. In short, if you play the orks like brainless comic relief that talk like soccer hooligans, you’re going to get comic relief and little true threat. If you play them as the savage, barbaric, low-cunning brutes that they are, you’ll get a LOT more mileage out of them.
  9. How has the profit factor hit per ship worked out? I think one of the difficulties with the rules as they stand is that almost every non-xeno ship the players defeat in combat can be salvaged and recovered to a ship in their fleet. Obviously, there are some factors that can alleviate this. It takes time to salvage a ship, drag it back to port, etc. Also, if the players defeat a couple smaller ships, but some other factor (race against time, more enemies incoming, etc) forces them to flee, they’re denied ships as well. And of course there’s the occasional warp drive implosion. The big problem is that, as stated, the more ships and firepower they have at their disposal, the harder it is to truly challenge them without scaling the game to ridiculous levels (i.e. giving pirates a fleet that battlefleet calaxis would be envious of). Even planetary invasions can become simple affairs – park fleet in orbit, pod/shuttle down troops from ships with barracks while a couple smaller vessels cruise into low orbit and lance strike enemy positions/anti-air installations. Luckily I haven’t had this problem come up in the games I’ve run – the players always just wanted to keep it simple and stick to one ship. Has anyone else introduced a profit factor hit or some other penalty for running around with a large fleet? Instead of -5 PF per ship, I was thinking along the lines of -1 for transports, -2 or -3 for raiders and frigates, -3 or -4 for light cruisers, and -5 for cruisers. Also, any ship with an archaoetech component or xenotech component adds -1 per component to their PF hit (for getting more seasoned and experienced tech-priests, paying off crew and officials to keep quiet about it, etc). Any further ideas? ((Sorry to get off topic))
  10. Who or what are the Q'orrl? Sadly, never got Xenology. -Thulis
  11. Hey all, Question for you regarding the Slaugth. I really like these aliens and am looking to incorporate them into a future endeavour. However, there’s a problem in their design. Slaugth infiltrators, even in human guise, are psychic nulls/blanks, ala a culuxes (sp?) assassin. They generate a field around them that makes others highly uncomfortable and actually makes psykers kind of ill. How exactly have you all dealt with these infiltrators that stick out like sore thumbs? For background, I’m going to have the explorers stumble across a feudal/renaissance tech level planet. The planet is populated by humans with several major population centers (most cities around 1 mil pop) and numerous smaller settlements. Very earth-like planet, environmentally. The planet is ruled by an overlord (a slaugth master) who is a harsh but fair man. Many crimes are punishable by death, from the obvious ones (murder, treason, etc) to the lesser ones (large theft, break and enters, etc). Death is always by decapitation, with the heads swiftly whisked away (in preservatives, to be consumed). The people are happy as there is virtually zero crime since the overlord has ruled and are policed by a mysterious group called the Peaceful Children. The truth of the matter is that the slaugth came to this world about two centuries ago and rapidly assumed command of the various warring city states. They united them, and began a program to create their own enforcers. The population are required to submit a certain tithe of their youth to the overlord’s service, as Peaceful Children. Those submitted to service are basically killed and replaced by slaugth bio-constructs, using the youths’ bodies to create extremely resilient soldiers, virtually immune to most weapons possessed by the relatively primitive humans. The slaugth eliminated crime through their ability to retrieve memories from brains consumed. They would catch a member of a criminal network, such as a thieves’ guild, consume their brain, and be able to see who that person worked with, thus being able to eliminate entire criminal networks and families with extreme efficiency. The explorers will come across this world and most likely initially see it as a world they can easily exploit. They’ll want to meet with world leaders, etc. How can I arrange said meetings without the players going “Why is the entire ruling class psychic blanks?!”. They’ve played DH before, and might put two and two together very quickly. Any tips? -Thulis
  12. signoftheserpent said: Thulis said: OMG dude, in the time and effort you've been harping on this, you could've easily made up stats for the various xenos/items you're complaining about being left out of the game. Endless harping is pointless. Was the starship section in the main book a little underwhelming? Yes. There's a book coming out for that. Xenos a little sparse? Yeah. Go pick up creatures anathema or make things up yourself. Endless bitching isn't productive. If things aren't represented in the official source material, use fan made supplements, make things up yourself, and do your job as a GM. FFG doesn't have the time or resources to spoon-feed every single person every single item they want in a universe as vast as the 40k one. You obviously have a lot of time and energy on your hands to consistently post these huge whines... turn that time and energy into something productive. Or just find a new game if you think this one sucks so much. -Thulis are you actually being serious? Wow, you really do need everything spoonfed. YES -Thulis
  13. OMG dude, in the time and effort you've been harping on this, you could've easily made up stats for the various xenos/items you're complaining about being left out of the game. Endless harping is pointless. Was the starship section in the main book a little underwhelming? Yes. There's a book coming out for that. Xenos a little sparse? Yeah. Go pick up creatures anathema or make things up yourself. Endless bitching isn't productive. If things aren't represented in the official source material, use fan made supplements, make things up yourself, and do your job as a GM. FFG doesn't have the time or resources to spoon-feed every single person every single item they want in a universe as vast as the 40k one. You obviously have a lot of time and energy on your hands to consistently post these huge whines... turn that time and energy into something productive. Or just find a new game if you think this one sucks so much. -Thulis
  14. I can't see an untouchable becoming a marine for the reasons already stated. Untouchables are insanely rare, much more so than psykers (already rare). The odds of an untouchable being found as a suitable recruit as a marine, then surviving any trials the chapter throws at him, then surviving the surgeries would be astronomically small. And as stated above, his squad mates would be uncomfortable as hell around him. On a lot of the savage worlds marines recruit from, I could see the natives killing untouchables on sight, considering them (possibly rightly) as abominations. -Thulis
  15. BaronIveagh said: H.B.M.C. said: Peacekeeper_b said: Thats right ladies and gentlemen, I just fed the trolls. Speaking of which, I have a new sig. BYE I have one too. Actually, I'll expand opon that: Fem Marines are an inevitability. The reason is that GW doesn't sell minis to thier existing customers. It is assumed that, as an existing customer, you will buy whatever they tell you to buy. They're constantly trying to sell minis to people who are NOT exisiting customers. Anyone who's worked in thier retail stores will tell you that this is thier policy in a nut shell. Space Marines are their primary sales pitch. They are the iconic 40k army. They appear on books they are not eve in. They are the 40k Wolverine. Marvel Comics has created a female Wolverine. (For those that do not follow MC, I'm not joking) The reason is that Marvel Comics realized that a little under half the nerds and geeks in the world are female. This move has proven surprisingly successful. She gets her own book this month. This is because tabletop games, comic books, and RPGs are a form of wish fulfillment. Deep down at some point you want to be this person. How long is it before GW, as a for-profit corporation, gets the idea that more female gamers = more money? And the silly part is that they can get them through the door through simply striking one paragraph and modeling a hand full of new torsos and legs. Comparing GW and Marvel comics is apples and oranges. Marvel frequently comes out with all sorts of different or alternate versions of characters. Female spider man, 1600s xmen, zombie heroes, etc etc. GW has marines, angry marines, holy angry marines, closeted marines, and marines with drinking problems. Variety, yes, but nothing on the scale of Marvel (and nowhere near as dumb as some of their alternate worlds). Do I especially care if marines are male or female? No. Well, at least I didn't, until I started reading some of the asinine "Marines can be women in canon" arguments on this site. Now I'm firmly in the marines are male camp. GW says so, FFG says so, that's that. If you want to play with female marines, go right ahead, but you're not playing in the 40k world... maybe in an alternate universe where marines can be female, orks are hippies, eldar are savages wielding choppas, and necrons are clowns. -Thulis PS Nice immature sig comment - a lot of us nerds have wives, kids and aren't the least bit intimidated by women.
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