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awayputurwpn

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About awayputurwpn

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  1. awayputurwpn

    System Strain and Combat

    #7 might work if the character has some way of obtaining a third maneuver, such as the Explorer's Unmatched Mobility. The rules on vehicle maneuvers are unclear; they don't explicitly allow for a ship to perform more than two maneuvers, although they don't outright forbid it like they do for characters. The only plain restriction on vehicle maneuvers is that a Silhouette 5 starship/vehicle can't benefit from more than one Pilot Only maneuver per round.
  2. awayputurwpn

    Tactical Combat in the Narrative System

    I think that's the key, the understanding that combat rounds and ranges are basically "as long as you need them to be."
  3. awayputurwpn

    Supreme Armor Master question

    I see what you're saying. The little talent box in the talent tree is primarily designed as a reference, and the actual rules for the talent are in the talent section a few pages later in Keeping the Peace. So if there is ever any confusion as to the wording or meaning of a talent entry within a specialization, you can just look up the talent in the talent section of the given book for a full explanation of how the talent works! I agree that the talent could be worded better, but I don't think the semicolon is the problem.
  4. awayputurwpn

    Supreme Armor Master question

    Semicolons are used to link two clauses that have similar thoughts. In this case, the rules are saying "Do this incidental; here's what this incidental does." It's the way semicolons work: you make a clause, and then after the semicolon you follow it up with a new clause that basically contains the same thought, but perhaps expounded or with an example/illustration. Semicolons aren't used to separate two different lines of thought; mild cheddar cheese is the best thing to use for grilled cheese sandwiches.
  5. awayputurwpn

    Players in/around Cork?

    Hey I've been there! County Cork is one of my legit favorite places ever. Hope you find some more gamers up your way! Have you tried www.meetup.com?
  6. I think there's two forces at work here: the desire to scale difficulty so that everything isn't a cakewalk, and also the desire for XP to actually mean something. If you want your skill advancement to matter, then you'll want some jobs to become easier as your characters advance. The stronger I get, the easier the same rope is to climb. However, also the stronger I get, the more difficult stuff I can do. So that is where scaling comes in. You don't want to make it so that the same stormtroopers that you players fight over and over just keep getting tougher, with higher wound thresholds and better armor—if you do, then XP is meaningless. But you can throw way more stormtroopers at them, or stormtroopers kitted out with E-Webs, when they attain higher levels. Now it's exciting, because your players can look back and say, "Man, when we started several months back, that encounter would have wiped us out!"
  7. awayputurwpn

    How to Make Combat Interesting

    I find with high quality miniature maps, the details of the map often give you ideas as to how to go about detailing environmental effects. Also, in Star Wars there are flying vehicles, droids, and any myriad number of ways to get from point A to point B vertically. The real beauty is in the sheer scope. You can get knocked down a level or two, and now the entire combat encounter is vastly different! I would advise against running a chase using a miniature-scaled map, though. They are too small for an adequate chase sequence to take place, IMO. Chases are best left to theater of the mind, or to occasional graphics (if you run that kind of game). If you do use miniatures in a chase scene, I would only use them for tracking relative distances, not for to-scale movement.
  8. awayputurwpn

    How to Make Combat Interesting

    That was crazy fun!
  9. awayputurwpn

    How to Make Combat Interesting

    Here's another PvP example of movement in a fight scene. Feel free to skim past all the OOC discussion, the whole of the duel is kept to the first 3 pages of the thread.
  10. awayputurwpn

    How to Make Combat Interesting

    Plenty of table space The maps are here: https://maps-of-mastery-store.myshopify.com/collections/sci-fi-maps
  11. awayputurwpn

    Dwarf Wookiee

    That would be an awesome obligation! Great variation on Marty McFly’s “Nobody...calls me...chicken.”
  12. awayputurwpn

    Dwarf Wookiee

    The Wookiee doctor, a tried-and-true classic! You will go far, my friend. I also would suggest you don’t do this. Keep his Brawn at 3 and use his starting XP to boost his Willpower to 2 if you want, but don’t mess around with swapping out base characteristic values.
  13. Ah, I think I see the problem. Don't have the Hutt roll the skill check and force the results on the players, unless of course they ask for it. Rather, I'd suggest that you have the players roll opposed skill checks as they interact with the Hutt. Then you have some license to inform their feelings. Everything else you're suggesting sounds totally reasonable.
  14. Two things: The way around the whole "taking away player agency" problem is the social contract involved in the players picking up the dice. As soon as they pick up the dice pool for a skill check, they are signing away a portion of their agency to the whims of chance and the interpretation of the GM. So if they are interacting with a fearsome creature or a harrowing situation, and they roll a crapload of Threat or a Despair, you are 100% within your rights to say "Chundarr, you find yourself unnerved by the spectacle of the rancor gobbling down a fully grown human. Your fight-or-flight instincts are kicking into high gear! What do you do?" And as you're narrating, toss him some setback dice or have him make a fear check. When making a fear check, the mechanics are the end of it for you. You're not necessarily telling a player how their character feels when they make a fear check; you are simply applying a mechanical modifier to the encounter. It's 100% up to the players how they want to narrate that particular mechanic. "Chundarr shows no fear, and utters a war cry to rally the others!" Rather than stymying or hemming in your players' creativity, fear checks can give them fuel. It's all in how you handle them: define the parameters, let them know mechanically what they're getting into, and then give them as much narrative license as possible. Reward good roleplay by tossing them Boost dice.
  15. Well failing anything else, there's unskilled assistance. Have the player narrate it, and throw a boost die to the character forming the dice pool. Player go crazy for those little things, it's like seeing a mini schnauzer flip out over those tiny little doggy treats (I'm exaggerating...mini schnauzers aren't nearly as excitable as nerds at a gaming table)
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