Jump to content

ShortBusFury

Members
  • Content Count

    13
  • Joined

  • Last visited

    Never

About ShortBusFury

  • Rank
    Member

Contact Methods

  • AIM
    -
  • MSN
    -
  • Website URL
    -
  • ICQ
    -
  • Yahoo
    -
  • Skype
    -

Profile Information

  • Location
    Fort Worth, Texas, United States
  1. This could get pretty exploitable game-mechanic-wise and it also ends up being a bit un-realistic, expensive, and/or, at the very least, tactically redundant. In reality and in-game, if one grenade doesn't do what you need, then I think it may be time to switch to a different type of grenade. If there is no grenade that will do what you want, then I believe it has become the time to upgrade to a man-portable missile launcher. If you need multiple missiles to decimate that moving target, then it's time to hop in a tank or similarly-geared assault vehicle and get to work.
  2. Gah... of course, I used my initial reply as a template in this thread and then accidentally posted it here anyway. Go me! Yay... anyhoo, I did re-post this in it's own thread in this same forum. Sorry for the double-post. (:
  3. I was reading Vespers' post on "General Rules for Any Role Playing Sessions" and his first house rule brought one of our tables' own to mind that I thought some of ya'll might find useful. I figured I'd post this in it's own thread to avoid hi-jacking Vespers' thread. Our group has been playing pretty much everything for well over 10 years now and the one rule that stuch which everyone has always seemed happy with is what we call "Food XP". If you bring food or drinks for the entire table or otherwise pitch in to help pay the cost to the person who did, then you get awarded Food XP for the session. Food XP is always small, but decent, and can only be awarded once per session. For instance, a 10% XP bonus is the standard for whatever game we're playing, but in Dark Heresy (and the Warhammer Fantasy RPG) the Food XP is a simple 50xp. In Storyteller games it's 1xp. This means that, for most games, if you show up and do something to gain food XP every session, then you will gain an extra level over everyone else after 10 sessions. In Dark Heresey it means you can get a free 100XP skill or talent every two sessions. Basically, it started as XP for food, but has since migrated to any sort of benefit to the entire table. If someone brings extra paper for the printer so everyone can print out more character sheets and the like, then they get Food XP. If someone ran a game for everyone last week and get to actually play in one this week, then they get Food XP. Again, it's only awardable once per session, so none of this bonus XP stacks for those players with an eye for exploits. Some people always bring food or sodas, but since we implemented the Food XP rules, everyone pitches in alot more, and even the people that normally wouldn't pitch in, now pitch in every other week or so. Players that aren't getting food XP don't mind, because the person getting food XP brought them food or some-such. If they get jealous enough of the bonus XP, then they'll give the person who brought food $5 and share in the Food XP. After numerous years of playing, it's always been a win-win situation.
  4. I was reading Vespers' post on "General Rules for Any Role Playing Sessions" and his first house rule brought one of our tables' own to mind that I thought some of ya'll might find useful. I figured I'd post this in it's own thread to avoid hi-jacking Vespers' thread. Our group has been playing pretty much everything for well over 10 years now and the one rule that stuch which everyone has always seemed happy with is what we call "Food XP". If you bring food or drinks for the entire table or otherwise pitch in to help pay the cost to the person who did, then you get awarded Food XP for the session. Food XP is always small, but decent, and can only be awarded once per session. For instance, a 10% XP bonus is the standard for whatever game we're playing, but in Dark Heresy (and the Warhammer Fantasy RPG) the Food XP is a simple 50xp. In Storyteller games it's 1xp. This means that, for most games, if you show up and do something to gain food XP every session, then you will gain an extra level over everyone else after 10 sessions. In Dark Heresey it means you can get a free 100XP skill or talent every two sessions. Basically, it started as XP for food, but has since migrated to any sort of benefit to the entire table. If someone brings extra paper for the printer so everyone can print out more character sheets and the like, then they get Food XP. If someone ran a game for everyone last week and get to actually play in one this week, then they get Food XP. Again, it's only awardable once per session, so none of this bonus XP stacks for those players with an eye for exploits. Some people always bring food or sodas, but since we implemented the Food XP rules, everyone pitches in alot more, and even the people that normally wouldn't pitch in, now pitch in every other week or so. Players that aren't getting food XP don't mind, because the person getting food XP brought them food or some-such. If they get jealous enough of the bonus XP, then they'll give the person who brought food $5 and share in the Food XP. After numerous years of playing, it's always been a win-win situation.
  5. I was basing my talent suggestion off of the descriptions of the blind seers of the Empire in the Horus Heresy novels. In the novels they are able to navigate non-living physical obstacles without any obvious difficulty.
  6. I just wanted to share a quick notion. I tend to play with some rather "bland" players when it comes to the story-side of things. Most of them are very combat heavy. One of our players made a Hiver Assassin who was forced to wear an explosive collar during his first few months as an acolyte due to the nature of his recruitment. The acolyte's Inquisitor later removed the collar when he showed courage in the face of adversity and saved the entire party at an extreme risk to his own life (the party was about to wipe and he had a extremely slim chance of surviving if he stayed). The character in question decided to continue wearing the collar(albeit with the explosives disabled) unfastened to hang loosely about his neck as a trophy and memento . It's actually brought up a few complications in certain scenarios but he has refused to remove it and taken sacrifices to leave it in play. I have rather enjoyed watching him roleplay through it and it occured to me that I should reward him in some minor way. I decided to allow it to act as a charm from the main book and, as long as he is wearing it, he receives a free re-roll every session. Now, I know the other players are going to see this as a chance to gain a game benefit and will try to emulate his actions in some way to meta-game it to their advantage. I will make sure that any such obvious attempts at meta-gaming will fail unless they're exceptionally original or imaginative. It will also give the originating player a chance to gloat a bit and make light jibes, which is always entertaining. Just thought I'd share. (:
  7. xenobiotica said: Defensive Command for instance, was this a complaint some player had, that he couldn't make a fellow acolyte dodge better by yelling "Dodge!"? And how to explain parry? Would he yell "No that's not how you do it, you're supposed to hold the blade like this!"? It just seems odd that a successful Command test would invalidate a failed dodge or parry. This was put in to encourage team work, make social characters a bit more valuable in combat, and give the player a little bit more control in keeping their minions alive. xenobiotica said: Subdue is already possible (but hard, especially against an armoured enemy) by using unarmed combat; 1 level of Fatige if the damage done is equal to or higher than the opponents Toughness Bonus. The problem with those rules is that trying to take down someone with a stun baton still kills the target majority of the time and, if it doesn't, it still puts them in the hospital for a month or two as wounding someone is the only way to take them out with one. We have run into this problem at our table multiple times as our Arbites player keeps trying to capture suicidal cultists alive for questioning in a police-like manner. I've also instigated a "three successful grapple actions in a row allows the target to be manacled" on his behalf. xenobiotica said: Armours as they are now can impose negative effects, due to weight. And strength already plays a part in this because the lower your Strength Bonus is the less you can carry without becomming encumbered. -10 to tasks requiring fine manipulation wouldn't come from a slightly heavy armour, it would come from thick gloves. And movement impairment is also covered by the amount you carry. The helmet rules I could consider getting behind but I would even then recccomend that if you really intend to use these rules that the penalties would dissappear if the armour was of, at least, good quality. I can see you trying to make a case for these rules if they would apply to Carapace armour only, because of their description, but that wouldn't really be fair. We tend to favor less record-keeping and faster gameplay. This streamlines things quite a bit for us. We don't bother messing with encumberance unless a player has entered the realm of the ridiculous (i.e. "Joe, how the hell are you carrying a heavy stubber, RPG launcher, 2,000 rounds of stubber ammo, and a two-handed mono-sword?"). xenobiotica said: With the Hit Em' Where it Counts rule, it seems like it's your players wanting to impose a system of critical hits before reaching 0 wounds. Reaching 0 wounds is the game's way of telling you that your body is starting to break down. Wounds (and other damage systems in other RPGs) needn't be taken literally, that's the misstake that many make when wanting to change a damage system. 0 wounds could just as well be interpreted as the ammount of pain you're in is starting to become more apparent because your body cannot release more epinephrine into your system, or some such explanation. A person with more wounds could just be someone who has learned to deal with pain in their own way or just have a lower sensetivity to pain, or any number of other reasons. With this rule all your players should be smart enough to purchase Deadeye Shot and Sharpshooter as early as possible, make sure to get a accurate weapon, and shoot their enemy in the arms to give them a -20 penalty to everything they do wih that arm, and that's alot. Then shoot them in the head and suddenly they've got -30 to use the wounded arm.I can see Pull Blow functioning with melee attacks, but certainly not chain or power weapons. Ballistic weapons should be considerably harder, and shouldn't even be possible with some weapons, such as melta, plasma, launcher, weapons not capable of single shots, most heavy weapons and anything that causes 2d10 or more damage. In fact I think it should be restricted to SP and Las pistol, any maybe some Basic SP and Las. I assume this rule (and subdue) comes from the players to capture an enemy rather than killing it. If this is the case then you shouldn't need a special rule that makes this option available, this could just as well be rollpayed. Both of these rules were both started up as one of our players wanted the ability to wing someone with a non-lethal wound that would slow them down to prevent their escape. The rules were further elaborated upon for one of our Sniper-style players to give him more combat options. Pulling blows with a Las Cannon would still be possible, but I doubt that reducing the damage by 5 points is going to save a human being from becoming a stain in any case. xenobiotica said: Realism is all well and good, but any functioning RPG system needs a certain amount of arbitrariness to create balance. After all, if you want realism, plenty of people die from a single gun shot wound to the head, chest or stomach. Sorry if I seem a bit harsh, I just think you're overcomplicating a pretty functional system. The rules and game mechanichs shouldn't stand in the way of you or your players wanting to do something like capture an opponent. The players should take the initiative if this is something they want to do, instead of just continually shooting the enemy until he goes down, they should give him a chance to save his life by giving up. Then it's just up to you as a GM to decide is this is plausible or not. If they're facing a die hard fanatic he probably wouldn't give up, but if it's just some random scum or poorly trained militia why not give them a chance to do something other that trying to shoot or hit them in certain ways and locations in order to cause enough fatigue so they'll fall unconscious. My players enjoy more options in combat and all of these rules were created to alleviate arguments at the table that have happened previously. You may see these as over-complicating things, but at our table this is actually making things easier on us. In most cases I had to make a quick judgement to keep the game flowing then will work out a solution with the players after the game is over. I've always been of the mind to fit the rules to the players and not try to fit the players to the rules. We have a pamphlet-size copy of the errata and combat rules on the table for easy reference. Adding these to the existing combat rules isn't a stretch for us at all. I'm not saying that these rules may fit your own style of play or that you even have to use them. I figured that I would share them for others who may find them useful. If you don't find them useful, then that's fine, but that doesn't mean that someone else won't. They are "optional rules" after all.
  8. We had the exact same scenario occur in my last campaign. That is the reason that the Pull Blow rule in my optional rules post was created. Check it out and see if it suits your players. The forum thread is here: ShortBusFury's Optional Rules As an addencdum, I like the path that ItsUncertainWho was suggesting. Relying too heavily on game mechanics can make a simple idea a long drawn-out affair that is not likely to end in a desireable result. Example: Player: "I'm going to cut off his pinky" (rolls damage, emperor's fury, the guy 'splodes in a raind of boody death) Combat rules should be left out of the story-telling and social puzzles in the game. Ask what the character is doing then give a couple of rolls for the player to make based on the situation. You don't need to determine wounds, fatigue, or crits unless the poor sod gets involved in a fire-fight. If that ever arises, simply look how he turned out in your story-telling and apply any wounds or injuries as you see fit. For instance, if cutting off the pinky was the extent of the injury, I would apply 1 wound and a -10% to any actions requiring the use of that hand due to pain.
  9. The armor penetration of a bolt shell is 4 and it's damage is +5 (not counting any talents or other effects that might add to damage). Aainst someone in full soldier flack, that's a whopping 1d10+9 Explosive damage. That means that even with a TB of 5 you are going to be taking damage no matter how low the die roll. As long as you know what your players' are capable of (which you should since you're their GM) then you can the lethality of the opponents easily enough by setting their weapons and talents as appropriate. You just have to do the math beforehand. Right now, I am using the following formula for a campaign where the players are using SP weapons with manstopper rounds and high-pen energy weapons: Average Player Character Assumption: TB 4 & Armour 4 w/ 13 wounds Peon/Cannon Fodder = 1d10+3 (8 avg dmg): These individuals attack in swarms. Cultists, goblins, or whatever the fodder, there will be a large number of them. They won't hit very often and, even when they do, many shots will be grazing blows that merely plink off the players' armor. (Math says 50% chance to do 1 to 5 dmg to the player on a successful hit) Well-trained Grunt/Enforcer = 1d10+3 w/ Pen.3 (9 avg dmg): These are trained warriors. They often come in small squads lead by an elite version of their ilk with better aim. When they hit, you can expect it's going to sting. (Math says 80% chance of doing 1 to 5 damage). Huge Nasty Xenos = 1d10+10 (15 avg dmg): This sucker is bad juju. When he hits you it is going to hurt... bad. If you're not wearing any armor then this smack is likely to kill you. (Math says 100% chance of doing 3 to 13 damage and two hits will kill an average player). Those are just some examples kind of off-the-cuff, but you get the idea. The Average Player Character Assumption will change with the advancement of the characters at my table. I get the averages by assuming that each d10 rolled for damage is a 5.5. I count Accurate and Tearing weapons as a 7 average damage and ignore any bonus dice which would be granted by either of these qualities. It's dirty math, but it lets me have a fairly good amount of control over which encounters are going to change the moods of my players.
  10. WFRP 2nd Ed. and Dark Heresy crits are pretty much interchangeable. If you and your players like Warhammer's crit system better then you don't really have to change anything. Simply use Warhammer's crit system. We only bother with the crit rules when it's against a player or a semi-important opponent. If it's a peon, we just call it dead and move on, otherwise it slows down combat too much for our liking, but I really like the wide variety of crits given in Dark Heresy myself. One of my players has put together an on-line crit roller for both systems that you can use if you have players that bring laptops to the table. If you want to check it out, you can find it on his game generator's page at the link below: James' WFRP and Dark Heresy Crit Roller
  11. We've had a problem with Accurate weapons being a little too deadly. I don't mind so much the players one-shotting peons, but when peon snipers are one-shotting players that were at full wounds and players are one-shotting large beasts with 8 TB and 30 wounds there is a problem. We're actually treating sniper shots (i.e. Aim action + weapon with the Accurate trait) the same way you treat Dual-Strike a described in the official Errata. That means that you subtract armor once and then subtract toughness a number of times equal to the damage dice rolled. This also means that the attacker will add their weapon's damage bonus, after bonus damage from Talents and other effects have been added in, a number of times equal to the dice rolled. It makes penetrating armor much easier and you can actually do even more damage than before to lower-toughness targets. This also however, prevents someone from one-shotting an enormous, house-sized xenos with nothing but a hunting rifle.
  12. Yeah, I'd roll with what user4574's train of thought. You don't need to add a power, just give them a free talent and name it the something appropriate. Here's a quick throw-together that would probably work for ya': Guided by the Emperor Prerequisites: Psy Rating 1, Soulbound (The Emperor of Mankind) You have given up both your eyes and your soul in order to be a direct extension of the Emperor's own will. You lose both eyes and gain the Blind trait. However, your eyes have been illuminated by holy truth allowing you to see the world by the light of the Emperor himself. Anytime you would normally be called on to make a sight-based perception test, you instead roll psyniscience. This sight extends out a number of meters equal to your Willpower bonus and multiplied by your Psy Rating. You can see the world well enough that it does not hinder you in a normal fashion. You can fire guns or catch a ball as well as any normal, sighted man. However, this psychic sense is heavily covered with emotion. You cannot read printed writing or see digital images, but you can still sense their emotional content with a successful psyniscience roll. Strong emotions or powerful psychic storms may blind the character. In some cases, areas that have experinced horrible events may even cause fear as the character experiences ghosts of past agony and terror. However, the character will also never need to worry about bumping their shins into the coffee table when the lights are out.
  13. I'm starting a new campaign for my players tomorrow. The first one went well, but my players had a couple of grumbles over not having certain options or factors in combat... so I obliged and here are the results. Tomorrow we play test em', so we'll see how they handle at the table. I thought maybe some other groups might be interested in trying them out as well. Defensive Command: A character can spend their reaction and roll their Command skill to allow an ally to use the result of the Command test in place of a failed Dodge or Parry roll. The character must be able to see and communicate with the ally in order to provide them this benefit. Subduing: Any weapon that can be used in a non-lethal manner (fists, stun batons, etc.) can be used to subdue rather than attack. If a character uses a weapon to subdue a target, then any damage from the attack which would cause a heavy or critical wound is instead applied as levels of fatigue. Armor Has Consequences: Armor pieces covering the legs or arms of a character whose armor rating is higher than their strength will have the following modifiers applied: Arms: -10% to any tests requiring fine finger control (Security, Climbing, Demolitions, etc.) Legs: -1 to Agility Bonus (minimum of 1) Also, due to limited range of peripheral vision and ear coverings, carapace head armor, feudal plate head armor, and any other similarly-enclosed head covering, will apply a -10% to perception tests unless otherwise specified in the armor's description. Mesh and Power Armor ignore all of these negative effects unless otherwise specified in the armor's description. Hit Em' Where it Counts: If a character makes a called-shot, then they can declare the attack to be a Crippling attack. This applies an additional -10% to the roll and the attack will have added benefits if it does at least one wound to the target. The benefit of Crippling attacks are listed per hit location below: Head: The attack also inflicts one level of fatigue. Arms: The attack applies a -20% modifiger to any test requiring the use of the struck limb. The modifier remains in place until the target recovers a wound. Body: The attack knocks the target off of their feet unless they succeed against a standard test against Strength or Toughness (whichever is higher). The GM may give the target additional modifiers to the roll based on their size, extra legs, how stable their footing is, and other similar factors. Legs: The attack prevents the character from running or charging. The modifier remains in place until the target recovers a wound. Pull Blow: A character can choose to pull their blow in ranged or melee combat in an attempt to do less damage. This applies a -10% modifier to the attack roll and allows the attacker to reduce the amount of damage dealt, after calculating for Toughness and armor, by any number up to their WS or BS bonus respectively (i.e. WS for melee attacks, BS for ranged attacks).
×
×
  • Create New...