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Count Crapula

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About Count Crapula

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    Claremore, Oklahoma, United States
  1. AH (with expansions) is simply a HUGE game, and in my opinion one of the best ever made. I also enjoy FoD. They are both co-operative games (except for the Count of course). Arkham is full of depth, luck and a lot of player interaction. Fury is to me, more of a mind game, trying to outguess the Dracula player. AH plays great as a slolitaire game, as an added bonus. The obvious solution is to buy both. You won't regret the decision for a moment. Good gaming, Count Crapula
  2. Very nice narrative, Solan. It's a detailed session report without the numbers. I like it. Makes for great reading. Keep it up.
  3. Our games generally ran closer to an hour, but then I had one gamer who was a step beyond Analysis Paralysis; He could contemplate himself into a coma. 30 minutes is a pretty good estimate, once you have the basics down, but despite the number of players it should take no longer than an hour. It's definitely a "Light" game.
  4. I'm becoming sold on this version as well, Rashley. I have the Mayfair editions of Cosmic and More Cosmic. I was heart broken to see how AH butchered the game, chopping it into a pale imitation of it's former self, albeit with pretty pieces. After reading about FFG's take on the game, and watching the video review at www.boargameswithscott.com, it looks like a pretty faithful remake. I may have to keep my colored glass beads to use as ship marker (I'm a sucker for colored glass beads), but this one looks like a winner.
  5. I agree with TIbs on this one. If you bought the game and all expansions at once (which is exactally what I would do), you may want to start by playing the base game, then incorporating the expansions as listed. I'm afraid if you opened all the boxes, added everything to the mix, the learning curve would be pretty daunting, maddening, even. But then, there is a cozy asylum in Arkham...
  6. I like solitarie AH. I don't play 1-investigator, and rarely 2-investigators, simply because it makes it too frantic. I usually play 3 or 4, because it allows more exploration. I keep the game on the table and just take a turn or two at a time here and there during the week. As was stated earlier, a solo AH game is a little like reading a book. The game drips with theme and is full of twists and turns. It is like a tactile, three-dimensional PC game. This is one of very few games that plays as well solitaire as with a group, minus the interaction. But then, I talk to myself... a lot.
  7. Svavelvinter said: Even though it's one Yuggoth of a game my personal vote goes to Kill Doctor Lucky instead. There are some flaws with this game that stop it from beeing on top. The replay value is unheard of but it also bears with it a lot of expansions that require a lot of knowledge concerning the rules, a lot of things to keep track on all the time and mostly might scare away those who are unfamiliar with larger types of bordsgames. I for instance is having a hard time pursuading my friends to give this game a go since all the cards and tokens is to much for them, and this is friends used to roleplaying and such and also I've started with the core game. However, this game shouldn't be considered done yet as we still hold our breath for Innsmouth and possible some other expansions that even the odds of getting the important cards when adding several expansions. (like the next act begins etc). I have a weakness for expansions. If AH never had an expansion, I would lenjoy the game as much as I do now. My problem is when an expansion comes out, I feel a need to get it, and incorporate it fully into the game. Instead of selecting certain expansion elements and excluding others, I just add a side table to accomodate the new real estate. I do understand the concern, espcially if you had to teach new players. It can get overwhelming to a rookie. Some of us find the insane depth and complexity all the more reason to love AH's tentacled goodness.
  8. Tibs said: What's up Count Crapula! I don't remember seeing you since like two boards ago. Hey Tibs. Yeah, I'm back. Woo Hoo...I nearly missed the entire second version of the board. It's been a strange few years. I caught a bit of cancer (in my tonsils!) in '06, did the treatment thing, got healed, then left my job in '07. Now I'm living in Oklahoma doing petroleum research. I finally have a house with a real library/game room and am ready to start rounding up some players. It also seems I missed out on two AH expansions. Oh, the humanity. Time to get back to the maddening business of Arkham Horror. How is all with you Tibs? I'm still reserving judgment on the new board design. Take care, Count Crapula
  9. After dozens of plays with the classic set-up, my friend and I started playing a blind, random draft-type game. The pieces are unknown to the opponent until revealed. It makes it a little chaotic, but a lot of fun.
  10. I'll add my vote for AH as well. For me, with the right frame of mind, AH is more of an event than a mere board game. It's a giddy, deep, complex cathartic experience. I've found that even when playing the game wrong, as we did many times during the early days, it's still great. Trying to find ANY co-operative game is tough, and finding a superior, satisfying co-op game is nearly impossible. It is truly unique and undeniably epic.
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