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Tantavalist

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  1. Like
    Tantavalist got a reaction from Alasseo in You know you're playing Rogue Trader when…   
    - The Rogue Trader's player has min-maxed his character's Fellowship stat so high that he has earned the epithet "Wytch-Tongued" amongst the Void-farers of the Koronus Expanse.
     
    - The Rogue Trader himself is somewhat offended by this epithet, because he's never once used warp-sorcery to increase his powers of persuasion. He's always had more concrete things in mind when he dabbles with forbidden magics. Like raising a warp-storm to cover acts of piracy committed inside the Calixis sector (fuelled by the sacrifice of unsanctioned psykers).
     
    - Such is the awe that the Wytch-Tongued one's persuasive powers are held in, that when some of the crew mutinied they sealed their ears first lest his voice bewitch them. Rivals now conduct negotiations through the medium of vox-servitors to attempt to defeat his sorcerous tongue.
     
    - The Rogue Trader tries to seduce an Eldar Warlock he's just met in a potential combat situation, and after looking at the social rules and how high his Fel and Charm are, the GM realises he's got a 20% chance of succeeding. And he's willing to spend the entire session's budget of Fate Points to keep trying.
     
    - Plot hooks designed to bring the PCs to dangerous places are utterly pointless, because on hearing a name like "Processional of the Damned" the Rogue Trader immediately proclaims that this place sounds interesting and commands the Navigator to plot a course there. No attempt is made to learn more about this place beforehand, as "That would spoil the fun!"
     
    - The Rogue Trader actually sacrifices a full point of space on the starship to make room for a giant church organ, because he's decided that playing this during battles would be the most effective thing he could do. And then Battlefleet Koronus came out with rules for the Melodium component, making this concept official- and giving yet another +10 to his social rolls for having it.
  2. Like
    Tantavalist got a reaction from Darkbringer in Experience Awards   
    I suspect that I'll go with 10xp per session, given that on the night we'll be playing there's a three-hour session of which one hour is usually not given to gameplay. Thinking it over, it's likely that my issue with the XP awards is a case of the FFG people assuming a longer and/or more focused session than this.
     
    I'll see how it goes- though I've found it's better to start low, as increasing the XP awards generally goes better with the average player group than decreasing them.
  3. Like
    Tantavalist got a reaction from javcs in Stars of Inequity usage   
    The Stars of Inequity colony rules are a good starting point for managing colonies IMO, but the numbers will need adjusting (as most people point out, by default they grow far too quickly) and you'll need to houserule any additions that come up in the campaign (eg brining more colonists/infrastructure via cargo ships).
     
    As far as the resource depletion issue goes- I think that the problem is one of terminology, not mechanics. I just think of it as the resource being exploited, not depleted. The resource is still there, but now there's a mining facility extracting it at a steady rate for processing. A bonus to Profit Factor represents an ongoing source of income, not a one-off injection of cash (one-off treasures that give a PF bonus I assume to be sold and the funds invested). So, in theory destroying the mine would reduce PF but give the resources back. How resource rich a world is shows how many mines (or whatever) it can support.
  4. Like
    Tantavalist got a reaction from filliman in Stars of Inequity usage   
    The Stars of Inequity colony rules are a good starting point for managing colonies IMO, but the numbers will need adjusting (as most people point out, by default they grow far too quickly) and you'll need to houserule any additions that come up in the campaign (eg brining more colonists/infrastructure via cargo ships).
     
    As far as the resource depletion issue goes- I think that the problem is one of terminology, not mechanics. I just think of it as the resource being exploited, not depleted. The resource is still there, but now there's a mining facility extracting it at a steady rate for processing. A bonus to Profit Factor represents an ongoing source of income, not a one-off injection of cash (one-off treasures that give a PF bonus I assume to be sold and the funds invested). So, in theory destroying the mine would reduce PF but give the resources back. How resource rich a world is shows how many mines (or whatever) it can support.
  5. Like
    Tantavalist got a reaction from Marwynn in Stars of Inequity usage   
    The Stars of Inequity colony rules are a good starting point for managing colonies IMO, but the numbers will need adjusting (as most people point out, by default they grow far too quickly) and you'll need to houserule any additions that come up in the campaign (eg brining more colonists/infrastructure via cargo ships).
     
    As far as the resource depletion issue goes- I think that the problem is one of terminology, not mechanics. I just think of it as the resource being exploited, not depleted. The resource is still there, but now there's a mining facility extracting it at a steady rate for processing. A bonus to Profit Factor represents an ongoing source of income, not a one-off injection of cash (one-off treasures that give a PF bonus I assume to be sold and the funds invested). So, in theory destroying the mine would reduce PF but give the resources back. How resource rich a world is shows how many mines (or whatever) it can support.
  6. Like
    Tantavalist got a reaction from El_Jairo in You know you're playing Rogue Trader when…   
    - The Rogue Trader's player has min-maxed his character's Fellowship stat so high that he has earned the epithet "Wytch-Tongued" amongst the Void-farers of the Koronus Expanse.
     
    - The Rogue Trader himself is somewhat offended by this epithet, because he's never once used warp-sorcery to increase his powers of persuasion. He's always had more concrete things in mind when he dabbles with forbidden magics. Like raising a warp-storm to cover acts of piracy committed inside the Calixis sector (fuelled by the sacrifice of unsanctioned psykers).
     
    - Such is the awe that the Wytch-Tongued one's persuasive powers are held in, that when some of the crew mutinied they sealed their ears first lest his voice bewitch them. Rivals now conduct negotiations through the medium of vox-servitors to attempt to defeat his sorcerous tongue.
     
    - The Rogue Trader tries to seduce an Eldar Warlock he's just met in a potential combat situation, and after looking at the social rules and how high his Fel and Charm are, the GM realises he's got a 20% chance of succeeding. And he's willing to spend the entire session's budget of Fate Points to keep trying.
     
    - Plot hooks designed to bring the PCs to dangerous places are utterly pointless, because on hearing a name like "Processional of the Damned" the Rogue Trader immediately proclaims that this place sounds interesting and commands the Navigator to plot a course there. No attempt is made to learn more about this place beforehand, as "That would spoil the fun!"
     
    - The Rogue Trader actually sacrifices a full point of space on the starship to make room for a giant church organ, because he's decided that playing this during battles would be the most effective thing he could do. And then Battlefleet Koronus came out with rules for the Melodium component, making this concept official- and giving yet another +10 to his social rolls for having it.
  7. Like
    Tantavalist got a reaction from knasserII in A grey, not evil Empire?   
    All right, ErikB. You've made your point- you really, really dislike the idea of people portraying the Rebels as anything but good and the Empire as anything but Evil. It offends you on a personal level to hear people suggest that they might consider anyone in Imperial service to be anything other than a faceless mass of evil with a target painted on their chest who the Heroic Good Guys can gun down without any moral consequence. That's how you like to see things, that's apparently how Lucas likes to see things, so yes, that's how you can do things.
     
    Now, will you please stop constantly giving one-line replies to every post to the contrary that all ultimately boil down to you making the same statement over and over again?
     
    Your behaviour in this forum is beginning to resemble that of a Troll. You've had your say, people have read your posts, and if they still don't agree with them you have no further right to keep harassing people with that same point. Kindly cease posting here unless you've actually got anything new to say, or at least until you can say something that consists of at least two to three paragraphs instead of two to three sentances. Regardless of whether what you're saying is right or not, the way you've been saying it here- trying to win the argument by the sheer number of posts you make- is not acceptable forum behaviour.
  8. Like
    Tantavalist got a reaction from knasserII in A grey, not evil Empire?   
    Ah, the wonderful Martin Niemöller quote being misquoted as usual.
     
    He only mentioned "Them" coming for the Socialists, then the Trade Unionists, and then the Jews. The Catholics were never touched as a group by the Nazis, because Germany had far too many Catholics and the Catholic Church made them far too much of a unified group for them to get away with it. That got added to the quote later on, when someone was repeating it in an American city with a substantial Catholic population so that the public would identify with it more. As for the Communists, Niemöller probably considered Socialist and Communist to be synonumous anyway.
     
    Absent the Catholic quote, and it's pretty obvious that the majority of the populace can rest secure in the knowledge that as long as they play nice and don't join any radical rebel groups. "They" will never in fact come for them and will only come for people they don't approve of anyway. Which is how that sort of government manages to function. Knowing that it's only going to happen to someone else, and a someone else you've been taught is in the wrong, will have 90% of the Core Worlds feeling the Empire is right anyway.
     
    As for the destruction of Alderaan- the reason it manages to turn a significant number of systems to the Rebel Alliance is because the Death Star was destroyed shortly afterward. Alderaan was one of the Core Worlds, supposedly part of the wealthy and untouchable Elite of the setting. Destroying it sent a clear message that nobody is safe. Had the Death Star still been around, then just as Tarkin said, fear of the battlestation would have kept everyone in line. Who's going to rebel if they know the Empire is willing and able to destroy their planet? No need for a blockade and/or invasion that will tie up limited Imperial resources while rebels flourish elsewhere, just BOOM.
     
    Of course, once they made the point that nobody was safe, the means of taking that safety away was immediately destroyed. So, all these shocked worlds suddenly realised the true state of affairs at the same time that the big stick was taken away. Much as if someone threatened an unarmed crowd with a gun- and they suddenly realised his gun was now empty. Quick- jump him before he reloads (or builds another Death Star as the case may be).
  9. Like
    Tantavalist got a reaction from knasserII in A grey, not evil Empire?   
    Of all the RPGs that FFG is going to produce for the Star Wars line, Edge of the Empire is the one where this argument is the most relevent. The other will deal with the Rebellion and Force Users, so the Empire and it's secret Sith masters are going to be much more visible and in much more of an obviously antagonistic role. For the rogues and scoundrels of the Outer Rim, though, it doesn't really make much difference who runs things from Coruscant. It's not like those people come out here much anyway.
     
    As has been stated before in this thread, while the morality of the Star Wars universe is supposed to be clear-cut black and white, often the only real difference is with the Force Users. The side the Jedi are on is Good, the side the Sith are on is Bad. They swap sides, the Good and Bad flip-flop. Even accepting this as valid- since the average citizen of the Galaxy in the Rebellion Era doesn't know anything about the Jedi or Sith, they're not going to have these clear-cut indicators to base their opinions on. Even if the Empire is pure evil in your game, a large chunk of the populace won't accept it.
     
    One thing that struck me watching the Clone Wars TV series was just how the announcements at the start of an episode made the Republic of this period sound hardly different from the Empire in later decades. The Core Worlds are sending armies of Clone Troopers to subdue rebellious systems in the rest of the galaxy for the crime of not wanting to be governed by the Republic anymore. Imagine if, with none of the Star Wars fluff or preconceptions, someone described a Sci-Fi setting where that conflict was taking place- would you think the Republic or the Seperatists were the heroes?
     
    Also, while George Lucas clearly has no problem with bug-people genocide and the enslavement of self-aware machines, I'm afraid that my own interpretation of morality is a little more complex than that. A grey Empire seems to me to be the only realistic way to portray it.
     
    It probably doesn't help for my own RPG group that we're so used to playing FFG's Warhammer 40,000 RPG games. They've spent years playing servants of the Imperium of Man, which makes the Empire of Star Wars look like the Star Trek:TNG-era Federation by comparison...
  10. Like
    Tantavalist got a reaction from Aservan in A grey, not evil Empire?   
    Ah, the wonderful Martin Niemöller quote being misquoted as usual.
     
    He only mentioned "Them" coming for the Socialists, then the Trade Unionists, and then the Jews. The Catholics were never touched as a group by the Nazis, because Germany had far too many Catholics and the Catholic Church made them far too much of a unified group for them to get away with it. That got added to the quote later on, when someone was repeating it in an American city with a substantial Catholic population so that the public would identify with it more. As for the Communists, Niemöller probably considered Socialist and Communist to be synonumous anyway.
     
    Absent the Catholic quote, and it's pretty obvious that the majority of the populace can rest secure in the knowledge that as long as they play nice and don't join any radical rebel groups. "They" will never in fact come for them and will only come for people they don't approve of anyway. Which is how that sort of government manages to function. Knowing that it's only going to happen to someone else, and a someone else you've been taught is in the wrong, will have 90% of the Core Worlds feeling the Empire is right anyway.
     
    As for the destruction of Alderaan- the reason it manages to turn a significant number of systems to the Rebel Alliance is because the Death Star was destroyed shortly afterward. Alderaan was one of the Core Worlds, supposedly part of the wealthy and untouchable Elite of the setting. Destroying it sent a clear message that nobody is safe. Had the Death Star still been around, then just as Tarkin said, fear of the battlestation would have kept everyone in line. Who's going to rebel if they know the Empire is willing and able to destroy their planet? No need for a blockade and/or invasion that will tie up limited Imperial resources while rebels flourish elsewhere, just BOOM.
     
    Of course, once they made the point that nobody was safe, the means of taking that safety away was immediately destroyed. So, all these shocked worlds suddenly realised the true state of affairs at the same time that the big stick was taken away. Much as if someone threatened an unarmed crowd with a gun- and they suddenly realised his gun was now empty. Quick- jump him before he reloads (or builds another Death Star as the case may be).
  11. Like
    Tantavalist got a reaction from [S]ir[B]ardiel in You know you're playing Rogue Trader when…   
    - The Rogue Trader's player has min-maxed his character's Fellowship stat so high that he has earned the epithet "Wytch-Tongued" amongst the Void-farers of the Koronus Expanse.
     
    - The Rogue Trader himself is somewhat offended by this epithet, because he's never once used warp-sorcery to increase his powers of persuasion. He's always had more concrete things in mind when he dabbles with forbidden magics. Like raising a warp-storm to cover acts of piracy committed inside the Calixis sector (fuelled by the sacrifice of unsanctioned psykers).
     
    - Such is the awe that the Wytch-Tongued one's persuasive powers are held in, that when some of the crew mutinied they sealed their ears first lest his voice bewitch them. Rivals now conduct negotiations through the medium of vox-servitors to attempt to defeat his sorcerous tongue.
     
    - The Rogue Trader tries to seduce an Eldar Warlock he's just met in a potential combat situation, and after looking at the social rules and how high his Fel and Charm are, the GM realises he's got a 20% chance of succeeding. And he's willing to spend the entire session's budget of Fate Points to keep trying.
     
    - Plot hooks designed to bring the PCs to dangerous places are utterly pointless, because on hearing a name like "Processional of the Damned" the Rogue Trader immediately proclaims that this place sounds interesting and commands the Navigator to plot a course there. No attempt is made to learn more about this place beforehand, as "That would spoil the fun!"
     
    - The Rogue Trader actually sacrifices a full point of space on the starship to make room for a giant church organ, because he's decided that playing this during battles would be the most effective thing he could do. And then Battlefleet Koronus came out with rules for the Melodium component, making this concept official- and giving yet another +10 to his social rolls for having it.
  12. Like
    Tantavalist reacted to Marwynn in Xenos Empire Generator   
    I took a stab at an expansion of sorts, being the void ship obsessionist that I am.
     
    --------------------------
     
     
    9) Void Ship Technology and Access (Expansion)
     
    Use an Imperial standard component or hull as a base when making these adjustments.
     
    There are several steps in this expanded stage:
     
    A) Void Tech Base
    B) Weaponry Access
    C) Weapons Tech Level
    D) Hull Access
    E) Hull Tech Level
    F) Xenotech Component
     
     
    A) Void Tech Base
    (1) Standard Template Construct /  Derivation.
    (2) Xenotech (Primitive)
    (3) Xenotech (Advanced)
    (4) Warp-based
    (5) Hybrid. Choose a result between 1-3 then re-roll, rerolling 5s. Combine your choice with the rolled result. 

     
    Standard Template Construct / Derivation
    Owing to examples taken from STC technology, perhaps acquired from functional copies or derived from databases, this xenos species operates Imperial compatible technology. They have undoubtedly applied their own touches to the technology, no doubt committing several heresies in the process, but their ships conform to Imperial norms. May choose Imperial Standard for Weaponry Access or Weapons Tech Level.
     
    Xenotech (Primitive)
    This species is only just beginning to take its steps into the greater void. Or is somehow hamstrung from advancing further, perhaps due to resource limitations or something else. One on one, megaton for megaton, they are the lesser when compared with an Imperial ship. Suffers -1 when rolling for either Weapons Tech Level or Hull Tech Level, choose one. Crew size increases by 10,000, repairs gain +10 bonus.
     

    Xenotech (Advanced)
    Alarmingly, this race threatens Imperial void superiority. The Eldar are an extreme example as there are other races with impressive void capabilities. Their weapons are automated, firing denser bursts, or make use of advanced knowledge that humanity cannot grasp. Gain +1 when rolling for either Weapons Tech Level or Hull Tech Level, choose one.

     

    Warp-based
    Foul and dangerous, these foolish xenos meddle with forces they have yet to comprehend. They gleefully make use of warp technology to power their vessels and their weapons, not knowing (or caring) that they make themselves the targets of warp creatures. Frighteningly, some xenos know this all too well and have begun to use warp creatures as a sort of ordnance. All weapon damage caused by these xenos' ships also cause an additional 1d5 Hull, Crew, and Morale damage.

     
     
    B) Weaponry Access
    (1) Imperial Standard
    (2) Macrobatteries only
    (3) Macrobatteries and Lances only
    (4) Macrobatteries, Lances, and one Ordnance
    (5) Specialization (Re-roll)
     
    Imperial Standard
    Full access to the complete Imperial arsenal, excluding the Nova Cannon. 

     
    Macrobatteries only
    This species has not yet mastered, or does not see the benefit of, lances or other forms of weaponry. 
     
    Macrobatteries and Lances only
    Flexible and capable, this xenos' voidships are at least equipped with true ship-killing weaponry.
     
    Macrobatteries, Lances, and one Ordnance
    As above, but may choose one of: Torpedoes, Attack Craft, or Nova Cannon.
     
    Specialization
    Roll again, but may choose the Superior result for the Weapons Tech Level for one weapon component.
     
    C) Weapons Tech Level
    Roll for each type of weapon xenos has access to.

    (1) Primitive*
    (2) Inferior*
    (3) Imperial Standard
    (4) Superior
    (5) Advanced
    * May select an additional choice in exchange for one choice in the Advanced list
     
    Primitive
    Choose two of: Half range, -d5 Damage, +2 Crit Rating, +2 Space and Power
     
    Inferior
    Choose one of: Half range, -d5 Damage, +1 Crit Rating, +1 Space and Power
     
    Imperial Standard
    Weapon is comparable to Imperial standard components. Proceed with caution. May choose one from the Superior list but must also choose one from the Inferior list. 
     
    Superior
    Choose one of: +2 Damage, +1 Strength, -1 Space and Power, -1 Crit Rating
     

    Advanced
    Choose two of: "Turbo Upgrade" or "Quick Reload" for Ordnance, +2 Range, +2 Damage, +2 Strength, Tearing or Storm, -1 Space and Power, -1 Crit Rating

     
     
    D) Hull Access
    (1) Transports, Raiders and Frigates
    (2) Also Light Cruisers
    (3) Also Cruisers
    (4) Also Battlecruisers
    (5) Also Battleships
     
     
    E) Hull Tech Level
    Roll once regardless of how many hull types the xenos has access to. Apply to all ships.

    (1) Primitive*
    (2) Inferior*
    (3) Imperial Standard
    (4) Superior
    (5) Advanced

    * May select an additional choice in exchange for one choice in the Advanced list but cannot cancel an effect
     

    Primitive
    Choose two of: -5 Manoeuvrability, -5 Detection, -3 Power, -5 Hull Integrity, -2 Armour, -2 Speed
     
    Inferior
    Choose one of:  -5 Manoeuvrability, -5 Detection, -3 Power, -5 Hull Integrity, -2 Armour, -2 Speed
     
    Imperial Standard
    Hulls are comparable to Imperial standard components. Proceed with caution. May choose one from the Superior list but must also choose one from the Inferior list. 
     
    Superior
    Choose one of: +5 Manoeuvrability, +5 Detection, +1 Turret rating, +2 Armour, +5 Hull Integrity, +1 Keel slot
     
    Advanced

    Choose two of: +5 Manoeuvrability, +5 Detection, +1 Turret rating, +2 Armour, +5 Hull Integrity, +1 Keel slot, +1 Prow slot. Or add a Prow and Starboard slot.

     
     
    F) Xenotech Component
    (1) Weaponry
    (2) Defenses
    (3) Propulsion
    (4) Hull
    (5) Else
     
    Weapons
    Though similar to the end result of using macrocannon or lance batteries, this xenos' weaponry operates on different principles. Choose one of these effects for one weapon component the xenos has access to: Penetration 5, +1d10 Hull damage, +5 Morale and Crew damage, Drains 1d5 Power from target (which may cause some components to become unpowered, etc).
     
    Defenses
    Not all xenos create similar void shields, and some are surprisingly more advanced than STC patterns, or rely on other forms of defense. Choose one of these effects:
    Dampening Fields - Reduces incoming damage by Void Shield rating even after void shield collapse
    Mirror Fields - Imposes a -20 penalty to Detection and Ballistics tests but only -10 for macrobatteries
    Active Defense - Turrets fire ablative matter or energy that reduces incoming damage by their rating for each hit.
     
    Propulsion
    Many xenos rely on alternative means of propulsion which has its own merits and drawbacks. Choose one of the following:
    Pulse Engines - Double the degrees by which a vessel can turn at the cost of 1 speed for all ships
    Vectored Wings - Can reduce ship's Speed by 1 to gain +5 Maneouvrablity or reduced Manoeuvrability by 5 to improve Speed by 1
    Momentum Drive - As long as the ship doesn't turn its Speed increases by 1 up to double its normal speed. 
     
    Hull
    Exotic materials, odd adornments, or completely alien construction make xenos hulls often subjects of endless speculation. Choose one of the following:
    Ablative Armour - When hit, may reduce damage to Hull Integrity by its Armour Rating by permanently reducing the Armour Rating by 1 for subsequent turns
    Regenerative Hull - 5% of the ship's Hull Integrity repairs itself every turn
    Baffled Construction - The xenos fear a specific type of weapon more than any other, all damage from that weapon or component type is reduced by 50% of the Armour Rating (excluding weapons that ignore damage). 
     
    Else
    These xenos have truly something unique that no other race, or few others, can bring to bear. This could be like the Howlan Sway's gravitic projector that holds ships still, or the Imperium's Nova Cannon. It could be that each macrocannon shell houses an automated drone that causes further damage should it penetrate the hull. Or, for the more sorcerous xenos, their warp magic is harnessed and wielded like any other weapon.
  13. Like
    Tantavalist reacted to CaptainRemiVandigrath in Xenos Empire Generator   
    Rolls:
    5 2 3 2
    Feudal Structure
    Purchasable Landing Rights
    Traders will Fleece the Explorers
    Aloof Officers
     
    ...
     
    Sar-Der-Kem
    A collection of void docks, hab modules, and half-decrepit life sustainers at the edge of the Heathen Stars, Sar-Der-Kem is a cesspool that is managed by an insect-like xenos species that is little better than the facility they maintain.  Some of the dock managers have learned to speak a perverted form of Low Gothic, but most of the insect-like creatures maintain a foul language of clicks and hisses that even Adeptus Mechanicus translation looms have difficulty with.  
     
    Sar-Der-Kem's culture is based around the floating void stations they live in, with each unit acting as its own small society within the larger collection.  It is an anarchy borne of pheromone-based elections and constantly shifting alliances between the various void docks and administratum organizations that keep the xenos void docks (barely) functional.  Each void dock is managed by a small family unit of local xenos, who barter and trade among each other for supplies and trade goods to load onto the various ships that dock at their facility.  Ships entering the system are grouped up and led through the gravity rip-tides and pockets of radiation-soaked asteroids until they reach Sar-Der-Kem itself.  
     
    There, the captains bid on docking rights brought forward by the various family units, with each unit trying to make its own dock appear the most valuable and luxurious.
     
    Savvy captains know to listen carefully for half-truths and outright lies.  Very few docks on Sar-Der-Kem are truly luxurious, and most are deep cesspits full of parasites and void-borne pests.  The few luxurious docks are the private escapes for pirate princes and top-tier power brokers.  Once a deal has been struck the captains are bound to their agreements, and only the least scrupulous of family units would ever try and make secondary deals or go behind the back of the auction process.
     
    The government of Sar-Der-Kem exists just for looks.  Their xenos scribes keep things running, but their administratum is uninterested in complaints or problems.  The police forces protect the government offices from attack, but do little to patrol or enforce laws in the wider stations or void docks.  Only the most desperate visitors and locals ever go to the police for help, and the police are as likely to arrest the complainer for making a scene as they are to do a cursory investigation of the claims.
     
    Sar-Der-Kem is only a draw because it lets anyone with hard currency dock, and has a wide range of trade goods that captains in the Koronus Expanse need.
  14. Like
    Tantavalist reacted to CaptainRemiVandigrath in Xenos Empire Generator   
    Complications:
     
    Government:
    (1) Stable Monarchy (2) Repressive Authoritarian Dictatorship (3) Corrupt Republic (4) Democratic Anarchy (5) Feudal Trade Structure   Stable Monarchy This Xenos species has at least accepted that individual rulers are the most appropriate and stable form of government.  A powerful administration will watch over the taxes and goods flowing into and out of their trade hubs, and mountains of paperwork will follow the Explorers everywhere they go.  Most major government officials will have elaborate ceremonies and social expectations everywhere they go.  A practical-minded official in the right department will be a hugely beneficial contact to have.   Repressive Dictatorship With many of the trappings of a Monarchy, a Dictatorship has merely lost perspective on the role of its citizens.  It fears that any individual can bring down the entire state (a self-centered and ridiculous notion, but one they cling to with fear borne of paranoia).  There are twice as many guards as is necessary, and most of them are only half as competent as usual thanks to regular purges of their senior staff and malcontents.  The Explorers will need to be careful, lest they draw the attention of secret police or elite investigative units.  A small percentage of the xenos military will be extraordinarily well trained elite fighters, and these are the troops that will be deployed to anywhere that is a serious threat to the government (real or perceived).   Corrupt Republic Everyone is out for themselves, and the powerful are able to consolidate small empires within the larger xenos society present on whatever planet or void station they happen to live on.  Money and gifts flow freely from one power-broker to another, while other power brokers use this same stream of money to undercut their rivals.  Appearances are everything, and ballot-stuffing is a steady middle-class profession.  The Explorers will need to bribe their way up the food chain, and make sure they don't pay off the wrong faction in whatever market they want to enter.   Democratic Anarchy This xenos species has managed to create a society with hundreds of political parties, regular voting, and shifting alliances that would make any pure-hearted Administratum Clerk weep in confusion.  Xenos officials keep power by keeping their constituents happy and maintaining actual popularity with the lower classes.  In this society honorable favors are worth more than gold or throne gelt, and one bad media blitz can get the Explorers stripped of their trade rights.   Feudal Trade Structure Each Xenos is ultimately out for only themselves, and this society has built themselves around that concept.  Merchant families control major trade routes, and the government might as well be non-existant.  Each merchant house has its own powerful military organizations and investigative services, and an inter-family trade war is an expected cost of doing business.  Loyalty to trade houses is everything, and everyone expects their cut of the trade rights.  A trade family would pay well for a serious advantage over their rivals.     Landing and Trade Rights: (1-2) Purchasable (3) Requires a Bribe (4) Free with Purchase of Services (5) Individual Honor Challenge   Purchasable The void dock is busy, and lacks the facilities to service all the ships waiting to get in.  A simple auction system allows the captains with the best goods to dock first, get priority spots, and gain access to the services they need.   Bribe The xenos trade official would be happy to allow you to dock, but he would hate to see your ship be vandalized by the rowdy dock workers at the port...   Free As long as the Explorers purchase supplies and load up new trade goods from the empire's ports, they are happy to have you dock at one of their fine facilities.   Individual Honor Challenge Docking rights only go to the strongest captains and the best crews.  Each captain is required to fight in an honor challenge with the senior trade officials at the void dock, or nominate a champion to fight on his behalf.  The challenges range from physical combat to games of skill.  Depending on the success of the captain or his champion, the ship is then directed to one of the various docking ports on the station.  The larger the ship and richer the cargo, the stronger or smarter the trade official will be that wants the honor challenge.  A loss may hurt the trade official's reputation, or leave the Explorers to unload at one of his competitor's docks.     Trade Hub Goals: (1) Get Their Name Out (2) Fleece the Explorers for all they're worth (3) Gain Valuable Contacts (4-5) Maintain Appearances   Get Their Names Out
    For a stable society (Imperial or Xenos), repeat customers are a huge source of profits.  If the Explorers can shift business towards their new trade contacts, those contacts will be more than happy to give the Explorers a discount in the future.  Proof and word-of-mouth are a currency all their own.   Fleece the Explorers Long-term profits are risky bets, and these xenos merchants detest risk.  They want profits now, and assume that the Explorers are in over their heads.  Through fast talk, bluff, and even intimidation, the merchant will pull every ounce of hard currency out of the Explorers that they can.   Gain Valuable Contacts In an influence society, everyone wants to know someone important.  Even this foul xenos species has learned that.  If the Explorers can forge a new contact with a powerful influence figure for their new merchant, that merchant would happily give them discounts and favors in return.  But, if the xenos merchant hasn't been able to forge these ties themselves, what chance do the Explorers have?   Maintain Appearances In business, the appearance of profit and propriety can be more valuable than actually following the laws.  Xenos merchants here are as afraid of looking corrupt as they are of actually being corrupt.  If the Explorers gain the right leverage, the merchant might pay to keep the Explorers quiet; however, the merchant might also be powerful enough to make the leverage disappear through more violent means.     Local Security: (1) Gang Thugs (2) Aloof Officers (3) Sticklers for the Rules (4) Private Merchant Bodyguards (5) Martial Law   Gang Thugs
    What these low-life xenos lack in skill, they make up for in enthusiasm and violence.  There are no trials, no judges, when gang thugs are called in to investigate.  Instead, they quickly determine a guilty party and threaten or punish that party in whatever way the gang sees fit.  These roving groups are loyal to whoever they trust, or whoever pays them the most.   Aloof Officers In military organizations that are more social club than effective peacekeeping organization, officers learn that they don't have to sully themselves in the every-day affairs of their lowly citizens.  Xenos officers can become aloof, condescending, and uncaring of crimes or incidents that don't directly involve them.  They will need to be convinced that something is their problem before taking any action at all, and will often scoff at laws requiring them to do anything.   Sticklers for the Rules Some xenos love their rules, and take great pride and joy in enforcing them.  Littering is as important a statute as destruction of public property, and these xenos officers will happily spend time dealing with any infraction of any law.  Here, they make sure the trains run on time, the streets are clean and well ordered, and anyone stupid enough to break their laws are punished in whatever manner the law deems fit.   Private Merchant Bodyguards These xenos merchants are powerful enough to be above the law, and employ their own bodyguard cadre as a peacekeeping group.  This may be due to necessity and lack of laws, or due to an overbearing sense of self-worth by the merchant.  Bodyguards will strike back against any slight towards the merchant and their family, and actively work to destroy any threats real or perceived.  When they encounter the actual authorities for the local government, the bodyguards know that they have the real power and are not afraid to blatantly ignore the wishes of the local officials.   Martial Law Here, the xenos military has taken complete control of their society, and employ trained killers and brutes as the local peacekeepers.  Laws are harsh, oversight is total, and squads of well equipped xenos soldiers patrol the halls and streets everywhere.  Whatever the military perceives as its greatest threat becomes the only threat, and anyone associating with the enemy becomes a victim of the system.  The Explorers should make sure they don't have any obvious connection to the military's enemies, and that they know which military officers wield the most power over local battalions and spies.   ...Coming Soon: The seedy trade hub of Sar-Der-Kem
  15. Like
    Tantavalist reacted to CaptainRemiVandigrath in Xenos Empire Generator   
    Rolls: 4, 1, 2, 2, 5(fudged due to chaos/eldar conflict), 2, 1, 5, 3
     
    5-10 systems
    1 planet per system
    wary of outsiders
    Eldar allies
    Mixed Humanoid/Beast society
    Unreliable warp technology
    Focused on survival
    Met Rogue Traders before
    Warfleet
     
    The Chexochotal Empire:

    A warlike xenos civilization between 'Undred 'Undred Teef and the Winterscale Realm, the Chexochotal Empire has been expanding rapidly over the last two centuries after initial contact with corsairs from the Twilight Swords.  Aside from their known and open ties to the Eldar, Chexochotal has some continuing trade with a small handful of Rogue Trader dynasties based in Winterscale's Realm.  Based on their homeworld of Chitterai, the Empire devoutly practices a heathen religion focused on a bevy of minor xenos deities who all fall under the gaze of their Honored Maiden (depicted as a humanoid female of lithe proportions).
     
    Their home star system is well developed, with a teeming center of fifteen billion xenos on their primary world and a collection of void stations providing service and construction for their fleet.  There are actually two habitable planets in the Chitterai system, but only one of them has a xenos civilization based on it.  The other planet is a pristine garden world, and protected by a string of small void stations and a permanent fleet of system-based warships.  Chexochotal religion identifies this planet as the sacred resting spot of their Honored Maiden, and openly fired upon a Rogue Trader delegation attempting to land on the surface to survey and prepare for a colony.
     
    Culture in the Chexochotal Empire is divided into two facets, based on the two xenos species that live in close proximity to each other.  One species, the Chexo, are beast-like xenos with large fangs, powerful upper torsos, and thick identifying fur patters on their heads and neck.  The Chexo xenos strain forms the majority of the empire's military forces and brute labor.  
     
    The Chotal xenos are taller, thinner, and with avian-pattern reverse legs.  They form the majority of the merchant and administrative classes in the empire, and it is mostly the Chotal strain that Imperial delegations have interacted with.
     
    Both xenos strains appear subservient to Eldar, though the Eldar seem to take little notice in the day-to-day functioning of Chexochotal society.
     
    Most Eldar influence has been seen in the highest levels of government during special events, or when delegations of Eldar descend to planets for some obscure goal or interaction with the local populace.  They appear as advisers and religious figures, spreading their influence through manipulation instead of outright power.  Eldar ships of the Twilight Swords have been identified docking at Chexochotal void stations and flying in their fleets, but never more than one ship at a time in any given star system.
     
    The Chexochotal Empire is relatively small geographically in the Expanse.  Their warships are limited in size by their warp technology to the equivalent of Heavy Frigates, though they have a few system-bound ships that rival an Imperial Cruiser for armor and firepower.  Of their eight occupied systems, all are within a week's journey for an Imperial ship from each other, though it takes the Chexochotal a month or more to traverse their holdings with their warp technology.  They are lucky to have found a cluster of habitable planets that densely packed, and Rogue Trader dynasties spread rumors of the Eldar knowing of even more colonizable planets in that area of the Expanse.
     
    Interesting Locations:
     
    Void Dock Primaris
    The central and largest void dock above the capitol planet of Chitterai, Primaris is a seething mass of xenos creatures and trade goods.  Anything and everything needed to run a burgeoning xenos empire (from knock-off lasguns, to honor blades, to raw materials, and information) can be found on Primaris for a price.
     
    While not ideal for Imperial ships, most have been able to make due at the trading port with the equipment available.  Xenos traders there know that Imperials have money to spend, and are canny in their ability to extract it.  Occasionally, Eldar can be seen walking the crude halls of Primaris in sections that have been modified to appear like Eldar-sculpted architecture.  Chexochotal approximations of Eldar architecture is crude, but if the Eldar mind it they don't say anything about it.
     
    Chexo guards in powerful carapace armor and armed with shuriken catapults from their Eldar benefactors guard every major area of Void Dock Primaris.  They respond swiftly and violently to any outburst or threat to the laws and customs of their culture.
     
    The Void Dock Primaris is built like a large jellyfish: huge conglomerations of habitats and weapons on the upper shell, with long tendrils of docking ports, shipping facilities, and observation towers extending down below.  Void Dock Primaris is anchored in geo-synchronous station above the capitol city of the planet, and regular shuttle services run between the sprawling spaceport on the surface and the huge Void Dock above.
     
    System CX-1825
    At the leading edge of the Chexochotal Empire towards 'Undred 'Undred Teef, CX-1825 is a system infested by Orks that the Chexochotal Empire claims for themselves.  A splinter fleet under Warboss Gobteef took control of the system from the Chexochotal about a decade ago and has been conducting raids further into the empire ever since.  
     
    Fleet actions for the Chexochotal focus on securing the most favorable warp transition points of the system, and preventing the Orks from expanding their Rok production facilities.  Heavy raiding has damaged the fleet's ability to contain the Orks, and there is much fear back in Chitterai about how much damage the Orks could do if unleashed upon the rest of the Empire.  
     
    Fleet Docks of Novo-Cambria
    The central production and resupply station for the Chexochotal Empire, Novo-Cambria was the second system that the Chexochotal war machine conquered and colonized.  The Fleet Docks can dock dozens of warships (many damaged by fighting in CX-1825), and produce almost as many ships as the production facilities above Chitterai.  Only a few Rogue Traders can claim to have impressed the Chexochotal military enough to be allowed docking rights in Novo-Cambria, but they have indicated a sophisticated production capacity and a well stocked munitorium depot capable of outfitting ships up to the size of Imperial Cruisers.
     
    Its official name is the Glorious Fleet of the Unified Republic Docking Ports, Novo-Cambria.
     
    The Fleet Docks are arrayed above the inhabited planet in a series of octopus-like clusters.  Each ship has a separate docking arm, keeping it well away from other warships resupplying or under repair.  This layout is inefficient, but protects their warships from accidental detonations of ordinance and damage from ships undergoing critical failures.  At any given time, at least one or two of the docking arms shows damage from a recent explosion or warp core failure, indicating the fleet planners' caution is well founded.
     
     
    More Examples: (random rolls)
    1 system
    Thriving Void Presence
    Hostile to Outsiders
    Allies with the Stryxis
    Humanoid
    Reliable Warp Technology
    Want to Expand
    Fought Chaos Previously
    Warp-capable ships are Trade Only
     
    ...
     
    1 system
    1 planet
    Trade Friendly
    Home to Chaos Warbands
    Humanoid
    Unreliable Warp Technology
    Want to Please the Warp Deities
    Run-ins with Rogue Traders
    Ramshackle Ships
     
  16. Like
    Tantavalist reacted to CaptainRemiVandigrath in Xenos Empire Generator   
    Technology Base: (1) Self Sufficient (2) Unreliable Warp Technology (3) Reliable Warp Technology (4) Sorcerous Warp Navigation (5) Barter and Trade* *If Insular, re-roll   Self Sufficient: This xenos empire has just enough capability to maintain its coherence.  It's technology allows it to converse with other planets, send occasional dignitaries to another world, and maintain a standard of living for its citizens.  Much of this technology will be barely functional for the vast majority of the xenos in the empire, but the high-ranking figure-heads will have more accommodating surroundings.  Xenos empires in this stage cannot exist beyond a single star system.   Unreliable Warp Technology Xenos technology experts have discovered the warp, and created crude devices capable of transporting ships through the immaterium.  These are either highly unstable and expensive inventions, or rare modifications of found equipment from other civilizations.  The Empire will have enough capability to keep these ships functioning, but the technology is far inferior to the STC designs found on any Imperial vessel.   Reliable Warp Technology: A rarity in the Expanse, this xenos empire has discovered a technology on par with Imperial STC warp designs (or 'discovered' the STC design itself).  Their ships are still limited by distance and the vagaries of the Immaterium, but the empire has the ability to patrol its borders and punish its foes with powerful warships.   Sorcerous Warp Navigation: Through the most heretical means, the xenos empire has managed to breed or enslave sorcerers capable of navigating the warp consistently.  The empire's warships and trade vessels are capable of long, accurate warp journeys throughout the Koronus Expanse, and are more than willing to use them.  Very few empires have this level of ability, and if the Imperium learns of this threat they will pay handsomely in bounties and land holdings in the xenos empire to have them destroyed.   Barter and Trade: The Xenos empire has little or no ability to traverse the warp themselves, but they have good relations with another civilization (see their trade allies) that allows them to move almost unhindered on their allies ships within the bounds of their own empire.  Few loyal Imperial citizens can understand the mindset of a xenos empire such as this, but there is surely profit to be made.     Goals: (1) Survival (2) Expansion (3) Find Wonders (4) Please Warp Deities (5) New Technology   Survival:
    The Koronus Expanse is a harsh and forbidding place.  This xenos empire is finding that out the hard way.  They are under threat from exterior forces and internal strife, and are fighting tooth and nail (and claw and tail) to continue their heretical existence.  Assistance against their enemies will be met by grateful gifts and trade rights.  Appearing as yet another threat will turn the xenos war machine against the Explorers.   Expansion: Growth and death are the only two constants in the Expanse.  These xenos have chosen to expand, no matter the cost.  Their entire empire is directed towards discovering habitable star systems and colonizing every scrap of usable territory they can find.  Vast forges over their homeworld turn out the colony ships and exploration vessels, as well as the combat ships and varied supplies, required to keep such an effort going.   Find Wonders: Through religious fervor, the xenos empire has turned to the dead civilizations of the Expanse and seen great works that they can coopt as their own.  Exploration ships zip in and out of their ports, forever searching the detritus of the past for relics and wonders that will help them survive.  Churches on their worlds will be built around these relics, and ownership of ancient pieces of technology and art will signify status in their culture.   Please Warp Deities: Through choice or by corrupt persuasion, the xenos empire has turned its entire economic focus towards pleasing the foul deities of the immaterium.  The xenos ships search far and wide for slaves and sacrifices, and their religion is focused around dark rituals and heretical artifacts. Around their empire, the warp seethes and stretches at these offerings, and bouts of demon infestations indicate that it is only a matter of time before their warped architecture and corrupt government collapse into a warp infested wasteland.   New Technology: The Xenos empire believes in the heretech notion of progress and technological invention.  Their skilled forges and tech masters are forever refining and developing new technologies capable of catapulting their empire into a stronger position in the Expanse.  Given a piece of technology (whether Xenos or STC), this empire will have specialists capable of dismantling and learning from it.  The best specialists are then able to develop new creations that the Adeptus Mechanicus would be horrified to learn of.    Historical Contacts:
    (1) Chaos Invasion (2) STC Remnants (3) Eldar Plot (4) Conquest (5) Rogue Traders   Chaos Invasion: At some point in the past, Chaos Warbands invaded and tried to sack the empire's richest centers of culture and learning.  If they were successful, the Chaos Warbands now control the empire.  If they failed, the empire bears the scars of Chaos on the surface of their worlds.  Barren wastelands, warp spawn infested fields, and cracked moonscapes are all hallmarks of a Chaos invasion.   STC Remnants: This xenos empire has uncovered or acted as the descendants for a historical STC system.  Despite their xenos forms and lack of knowledge of the Imperial Creed, their technology base is built around equipment that is compatible with Imperial designs.  Perhaps these are identical to sanctified Adeptus Mechanicus equipment, or are merely the false imitations of more perfect STC forms.  In either case, only a servant of the Omnissiah would be able to tell the difference.   Eldar Plot: Like many caught in the Eldar web, this xenos empire has been nudged and guided by the hand of a Farseer for some arcane purpose.  The Xenos themselves do not know they work for the Eldar in this matter, but nonetheless are directing their civilization towards a Farseer's goals.  It is likely that there is an untouched garden planet at the center of their empire, kept pristine through religion and culture, that they will fight to the death to protect from outsiders.   Conquest One of the more fearsome empire types, this xenos civilization has already encountered other empires and conquered them.  The remnants of this successful invasion lay on one of the outskirts of their empire in differing architecture, void stations, and bruises to the surface of the planets they were forced to bombard.  With a successful invasion already under their belt, this xenos empire believes that they are up to any challenge.  They are arrogant, selfish, and focused on the glories of their past; assaults against their honor are not tolerated.   Rogue Traders:
    This empire already has experience with the creature known as the Rogue Trader.  An Imperial expedition has already been through this area of space and set up trade routes (importing low-grade Imperial products, exporting raw materials).  Profits may be smaller now that the empire knows a Rogue Trader's tricks, but they are also more receptive to trade with the Explorers.   Void Ships: (1) Trade Only (2) Advanced Industry (3) Warfleet (4) Stolen (5) Ramshackle   Trade Only: This civilization has not yet managed to produce true warp-capable war vessels.  Any defenses they maintain will be purely system-based, or anchored in orbit, or dug into a planet.  They use their trade ships to organize their empire, and have no ability to attack their neighbors.  These empires will be canny negotiators, and their diplomats will be trained to defuse situations before conflict arises.   Advanced Industry:
    Xenos engineers have managed to build up a sweeping industrial fleet capable of plying the void.  This consists of complex asteroid mining vessels, research hulls, and exploration ships.  What the empire lacks in pure offensive firepower, it makes up for with cunning strategy and advanced technology.   Warfleet: A practical xenos empire knows that their only true defense lies in massed firepower.  While not all of it may be warp capable, this xenos empire has built up a staggering array of combat ships armed with macrobatteries, lances, and torpedoes.  Their fleet is a sledgehammer, and their worlds are anvils.  Each planet will have significant defenses in high anchor, and will respond to any aggression with disproportionate firepower.   Stolen: While the Xenos empire isn't able to build their own void ships, they have become extremely adept at stealing ships of passing traders and pirates.  Their fleet is mismatched, and of varying quality, but their boarding crews are unmatched and their captains enjoy close-quarters boarding actions.  The Explorers should be careful, lest their own vessel be the next addition to the empire's fleet.   Ramshackle:
    The xenos empire has a fleet, but it is a fleet in name only.  Even the Orks, in their crude way, have more advanced technology.  This fleet looks like it could fall apart at any moment, and that a single warp transit would shake the ships' spines apart.  But the xenos empire persists, and they are not afraid to throw numbers at problems when their ships lack the quality to handle a situation elegantly.   ...Coming Soon: An Example Xenos Empire
  17. Like
    Tantavalist reacted to CaptainRemiVandigrath in Xenos Empire Generator   
    Allies/trade partners:
    (1) Rogue Trader Dynasty
    (2) Eldar
    (3) Stryxis
    (4) Chaos Warbands
    (5) Other Xenos Race
     

    Rogue Trader Dynasty:
    As in the history of the Expanse: He who was here first, gets the first spoils.  The local empire has a history of trading with a Rogue Trader Dynasty, who have already opened the empire up to Imperial trade.  This will make docking, resupply, and negotiations easier; but it may bring the Rogue Trader into conflict with the Dynasties representatives that want to keep the profit of this empire for themselves.  This Rogue Trader Dynasty can be a renowned or infamous one.  Renowned examples are: Winterscale Dynasty; Chroda Dynasty; House of Saul; Armengarde Dynasty; etc.  Infamous Dynasties are ones which have yet to make a name for themselves.

     
    Eldar:
    For a reason that only they know, the Eldar have taken an interest in this particular xenos empire.  Eldar occasionally walk openly in their cities, and Eldar Corsairs feel secure resupplying in the empire's ports.  This means that the empire has access to advanced technology of the Eldar, but also means that the Eldar want something here.  The Explorers will need to tread carefully, lest they accidentally stumble upon the thing the Eldar are protecting.
     
    Stryxis:
    This Empire trades regularly with Stryxis merchants, freely trading eclectic goods back and forth in the jovial manner that the Stryxis enjoy.  Above the Empire's worlds, their trade docks overflow with various goods from all across the expanse (both mundane and fantastic).  The Stryxis obviously see something of worth here, and likely will eye the Explorers warily (but with all the outpouring of praise the Stryxis are known for).
     
    Chaos Warbands:
    Either by choice or by conquest, the xenos empire is a central point of resupply and operations for local Chaos Warbands.  Foul ships wade into and out of the empire's trade ports.  In pens across the empire, slaves and sacrifices wait to be shipped to their next destination or be traded for the basic supplies required to keep the warbands raiding.  If the Explorers are able to trade with heretics, they will find the many icons and dangerous relics Chaos worshipers are known for.  Otherwise, they may have just found one of the most dangerous concentrations of heretics in the Expanse.
     

    Other Xeno Race:
    The Expanse is full of unknowns, and anything could be possibly.  A Kroot society could be trading work with the this Empire for weapons and/or chance to evolve.  Some feral orks might have been subjugated and now act as slaves (Ramshackle Ships anyone?).  Maybe the Slaugth have infiltrated their society and set themselves up as rulers.  Or maybe another unknown Xeno Empire resides at the edge of their society, and the only thing know about them is communication about a "Greater Good."

     
    Xenos Type*:
    (1) Humanoid
    (2) Insectoid
    (3) Deathworld Survivors
    (4) Beasts
    (5) Warp-twisted
    *There is a 1/5 chance of a mixed empire with 2 or more types of xenos (5 on a 1d5)
     
    Humanoid:
    Despite the benevolent gaze of the Emperor, these heathen xenos appear humanoid.  While they won't be mistaken as Imperial citizens, their unnerving similarity strains the bounds of Imperial Faith.  Explorers will gain a bit of luck in dealing with this xenos empire due to physical similarity, but will suffer if any of their crew are devout Imperial purists.
     
    Insectoid:
    These foul xenos look as disgusting as their heretical empire.  They have thick exoskeletons, several spindly arms with manipulators at the end of each, and clawing mandibles that look able to crush a human skull with each bite.  The xenos language the empire uses will be difficult to decipher unless the Explorers have some reference point to go off of, and their xenos architecture will cause problems for the crew.
     
    Deathworld Survivors:
    This Empire beat the odds, growing a technological civilization (or a heretical xenos approximation thereof) after evolving off of a deathworld.  They are truly dangerous creatures, as apt to kill and break bones as they are to trade.  If any of the Explorers go onto their void stations or, Emperor-forbid, one of the xenos planets, the xenos environment will be actively hostile to life.  Pets can kill gun servitors, air filtration units can choke crew with allergenic spores, and command consoles can report status by chewing on the Explorer's limbs.
     
    Beasts:
    As disgusting as Insectoid xenos, but with the unfortunate quirk of being warm blooded and with fur-like coating.  These xenos creatures will often have claws on at least one pair of limbs, and have cultures that revolve around honor duels and personal combat.  They will be expert hand-to-hand fighters, and their military forces will either be highly regimented or centered around individual combat prowess.
     
    Warp-Twisted:
    (roll again to see what these xenos creatures were before their encounter with the warp)
    This xenos empire pressed their luck at some point in the past, either calling on warp deities or by being too close to an active warp storm.  Their bodies are twisted, as is their minds and goals.  The Empire will have a higher than usual rate of sorcery, and their culture will have been affected down to the core by the warp exposure.
     
    ...to be continued
  18. Like
    Tantavalist reacted to CaptainRemiVandigrath in Xenos Empire Generator   
    I heard this idea mentioned in another thread, and it caught my interest.  These are some initial variables to roll from, and I'm open to suggestions on what other information is needed, or what other background may be helpful.
     
    Process:
    1) Size of the Xenos Empire
    2) # of planets they control per star system
    3) The Empire's outlook on the Koronus Expanse
    4) Their Allies or trade partners
    5) What the Xenos look like
    6) How advanced their technology base is
    7) What their ultimate goals are
    8) The most important group they've encountered during their history
    9) What type of void ships they operate
     
    Size of the Empire: (1-2) 1 system (3) 2-5 systems (4) 5-10 systems (5) 11+ systems   One The xenos empire occupies a single star system in the Expanse.  They likely have a few void stations scattered throughout the planets of their home star, and make occasional raids outside (if they have warp technology), but their entire population clings to a single source of light.   Two-Five This empire has just begun to colonize and conquer star systems outside of their home.  They are just getting a feel for multi-star empires, and are inexperienced on the galactic stage.  What they lack in experience, they make up in fresh raw materials and optimism about their place in the galaxy.   Five-Ten A burgeoning xenos empire that has likely reached the peak of its power.  It controls the worlds that it wants to control, and has likely fought at least one war to keep it that way.  They know of the major players in the Expanse, and are not afraid of what lurks in the darkness.  They probably should be afraid, since this is when major calamities begin to befall large empires   Eleven+ The largest xenos empires in the Expanse.  There are blessedly few of these, and they are major political players in their portions of the Expanse.  They know of many other empires, and are not afraid to deal with powerful organizations or enemies.  Xenos Empires of this scale are fearsome opponents and powerful trade partners, able to obtain things that can make a Rogue Trader incredibly wealthy.   Number of Planets Controlled: (1-2) 1/system (3) 2/system (4) 3/system + multiple large void stations (5) Thriving void presence   One per System: This empire is only starting to get its feet (or other appendages) wet in the game of colonization.  They have not yet developed terraforming technologies or equipment able to let their civilization thrive on hostile planets, so they keep to the highly habitable worlds of a star's green belt.  The xenos empire has likely built a few small void stations for defense and research throughout the areas they control.   Two per System: The xenos have begun to master harsh climate colonization, and have sprawling domes and proto-hives across planets that can barely sustain life.  Their burgeoning population is beginning to spread into the void, with a handful of large void stations hanging above the most important worlds.   Three per System: The void is a conquerable mistress, and this xenos empire is dedicated to proving it.  They have hung huge void stations for trade and defense above their worlds, and their ships ply the lanes between planets that are even marginally habitable.  Here, the xenos empire will be exploiting every resource they can find.   Thriving Void Presence: Every cranny of the empire's occupied systems are filled and exploited.  The xenos realize that they are a force to be reckoned with, and are beginning to think about their long term legacy.  Powerful ships defend huge void stations that rival the hives on the planets below.  Above their most populous planets, the xenos are starting to build icons and monuments to their glory.   Outlook: (1) Trade Friendly (2) Wary of Outsiders (3) Hostile to Outsiders (4) Insular* (5) Unconventional Economy *Do not roll on the Allies/Trade Partners table   Trade Friendly: This empire is more than willing to open trade negotiations with anyone who has valuable goods to import.  They likely have some controls to prevent undue competition or destructive animals/diseases, but their trade docks are happy to have the Rogue Trader visit.  The orbital facilities and ground-side space ports have ample equipment to quickly load, unload, and repair a foreign vessels needs.   Wary of Outsiders: This empire looks inward often, knowing that the Koronus Expanse is a dangerous place.  While a particularly clever and well spoken Rogue Trader can probably gain docking rights (often through a bit of extra bribery or promises to local officials), the trade docks are more suited to ships of their own species.  Rogue Trader vessels will struggle to find the supplies and equipment they need, and what they do find will be more expensive than expected.   Hostile to Outsiders: Here, a Rogue Trader will need to be at the top of their craft to gain docking and trading rights.  This empire likely has a religious streak that makes them cynical and suspicious of anyone not of their own species.  Any docking rights will be provisional, and the local officials will expect a thorough inspection of the Rogue Trader's ship for any contraband.  Trade will be done through improvised docking equipment, and resupply will be very difficult and expensive.   Insular: The Koronus Expanse is a dangerous place, and some of the only groups to truly thrive here know that shooting first, and asking questions later, is sound survival instinct.  A Rogue Trader entering the domain of an Insular Empire will be asked to leave or be shot on sight without question.  While a canny Rogue Trader might be able to talk their way in (a task made nearly impossible by the empire's xenophobic fervor), they will find few goods to be traded, and even fewer merchants willing to trade with them.   Unconventional Economy: It isn't that this empire dislikes Imperial dogma or Throne Gelt, they just have such a different concept of value and trade that a Rogue Trader will be hard pressed to sort out how the economy actually functions.  Perhaps the locals require a particular dance routine in addition to their monetary trade value, or perhaps the xenos creatures require specific pheromone sequences to induce the desire to trade with another merchant.  In any case, it will take all of a Seneschal's effort to deduce the economic structure of the empire and figure out how to exploit it.     ...To be continued
  19. Like
    Tantavalist got a reaction from Nameless2all in Ship battle - Hex or square grid?   
    I found that just having the ship miniatures and a measuring tape worked fine for the games I ran. 1 inch to 1VU was the scale I used, but that might just be the miniatures I had looking too big with a 1cm scale (I used the Twilight Imperium ships as my minis for space battles). With engagement range being 20VU, I found that we had more than enough space for the average engagement.
     
    Maybe it's just having more wargames experience in the group I played with, but we never found calculating arcs and turning hard without any squares or other aids.
  20. Like
    Tantavalist got a reaction from Covered in Weasels in You know you're playing Rogue Trader when…   
    - The Rogue Trader's player has min-maxed his character's Fellowship stat so high that he has earned the epithet "Wytch-Tongued" amongst the Void-farers of the Koronus Expanse.
     
    - The Rogue Trader himself is somewhat offended by this epithet, because he's never once used warp-sorcery to increase his powers of persuasion. He's always had more concrete things in mind when he dabbles with forbidden magics. Like raising a warp-storm to cover acts of piracy committed inside the Calixis sector (fuelled by the sacrifice of unsanctioned psykers).
     
    - Such is the awe that the Wytch-Tongued one's persuasive powers are held in, that when some of the crew mutinied they sealed their ears first lest his voice bewitch them. Rivals now conduct negotiations through the medium of vox-servitors to attempt to defeat his sorcerous tongue.
     
    - The Rogue Trader tries to seduce an Eldar Warlock he's just met in a potential combat situation, and after looking at the social rules and how high his Fel and Charm are, the GM realises he's got a 20% chance of succeeding. And he's willing to spend the entire session's budget of Fate Points to keep trying.
     
    - Plot hooks designed to bring the PCs to dangerous places are utterly pointless, because on hearing a name like "Processional of the Damned" the Rogue Trader immediately proclaims that this place sounds interesting and commands the Navigator to plot a course there. No attempt is made to learn more about this place beforehand, as "That would spoil the fun!"
     
    - The Rogue Trader actually sacrifices a full point of space on the starship to make room for a giant church organ, because he's decided that playing this during battles would be the most effective thing he could do. And then Battlefleet Koronus came out with rules for the Melodium component, making this concept official- and giving yet another +10 to his social rolls for having it.
  21. Like
    Tantavalist got a reaction from UncleSickey in You know you're playing Rogue Trader when…   
    - The Rogue Trader's player has min-maxed his character's Fellowship stat so high that he has earned the epithet "Wytch-Tongued" amongst the Void-farers of the Koronus Expanse.
     
    - The Rogue Trader himself is somewhat offended by this epithet, because he's never once used warp-sorcery to increase his powers of persuasion. He's always had more concrete things in mind when he dabbles with forbidden magics. Like raising a warp-storm to cover acts of piracy committed inside the Calixis sector (fuelled by the sacrifice of unsanctioned psykers).
     
    - Such is the awe that the Wytch-Tongued one's persuasive powers are held in, that when some of the crew mutinied they sealed their ears first lest his voice bewitch them. Rivals now conduct negotiations through the medium of vox-servitors to attempt to defeat his sorcerous tongue.
     
    - The Rogue Trader tries to seduce an Eldar Warlock he's just met in a potential combat situation, and after looking at the social rules and how high his Fel and Charm are, the GM realises he's got a 20% chance of succeeding. And he's willing to spend the entire session's budget of Fate Points to keep trying.
     
    - Plot hooks designed to bring the PCs to dangerous places are utterly pointless, because on hearing a name like "Processional of the Damned" the Rogue Trader immediately proclaims that this place sounds interesting and commands the Navigator to plot a course there. No attempt is made to learn more about this place beforehand, as "That would spoil the fun!"
     
    - The Rogue Trader actually sacrifices a full point of space on the starship to make room for a giant church organ, because he's decided that playing this during battles would be the most effective thing he could do. And then Battlefleet Koronus came out with rules for the Melodium component, making this concept official- and giving yet another +10 to his social rolls for having it.
  22. Like
    Tantavalist got a reaction from Count Xanthis in You know you're playing Rogue Trader when…   
    - The Rogue Trader's player has min-maxed his character's Fellowship stat so high that he has earned the epithet "Wytch-Tongued" amongst the Void-farers of the Koronus Expanse.
     
    - The Rogue Trader himself is somewhat offended by this epithet, because he's never once used warp-sorcery to increase his powers of persuasion. He's always had more concrete things in mind when he dabbles with forbidden magics. Like raising a warp-storm to cover acts of piracy committed inside the Calixis sector (fuelled by the sacrifice of unsanctioned psykers).
     
    - Such is the awe that the Wytch-Tongued one's persuasive powers are held in, that when some of the crew mutinied they sealed their ears first lest his voice bewitch them. Rivals now conduct negotiations through the medium of vox-servitors to attempt to defeat his sorcerous tongue.
     
    - The Rogue Trader tries to seduce an Eldar Warlock he's just met in a potential combat situation, and after looking at the social rules and how high his Fel and Charm are, the GM realises he's got a 20% chance of succeeding. And he's willing to spend the entire session's budget of Fate Points to keep trying.
     
    - Plot hooks designed to bring the PCs to dangerous places are utterly pointless, because on hearing a name like "Processional of the Damned" the Rogue Trader immediately proclaims that this place sounds interesting and commands the Navigator to plot a course there. No attempt is made to learn more about this place beforehand, as "That would spoil the fun!"
     
    - The Rogue Trader actually sacrifices a full point of space on the starship to make room for a giant church organ, because he's decided that playing this during battles would be the most effective thing he could do. And then Battlefleet Koronus came out with rules for the Melodium component, making this concept official- and giving yet another +10 to his social rolls for having it.
  23. Like
    Tantavalist got a reaction from polyheadronman in Why?   
    Something that's worth keeping in mind here is that EotE has an in-built mechanic that's perfect for dealing with players behaving in this way: Obligation.
     
    Every time the PCs create a random bloodbath, stick the party with 5 or 10 points in an Obligation like "Wanted Killers". Eventually, the game will be taken up more and more by them getting jumped by another group of Bounty Hunters, or another local Lawman who recognises them. If you just send these NPCs in, the PCs will gun them down but no amount of blaster fire or lucky rolls can remove those Obligation points.
     
    The PC will then, hopefully, start to learn how to work around the Obligation mechanic. They'll be looking for ways- none of which are openly violent- of reducing it. They'll also learn that they can't just kill people on a whim.
     
    Possibly your players are the sort who'll actually interpret this as just finding ways to kill people without getting Obligation. With the Bar Fight example, instead of pulling guns there and then, they follow their enemies afterward and murder them in a less public venue. After all, if nobody saw them- or, better yet, they frame someone else- they won't get Obligation: Wanted Killers for it. Which is still roleplaying of a sort, and an improvement on the current situation you seem to have.
     
    Remember- Obligation. The carrot and stick of EotE games. Make it work for you!
  24. Like
    Tantavalist got a reaction from bladerunner_35 in Why?   
    Something that's worth keeping in mind here is that EotE has an in-built mechanic that's perfect for dealing with players behaving in this way: Obligation.
     
    Every time the PCs create a random bloodbath, stick the party with 5 or 10 points in an Obligation like "Wanted Killers". Eventually, the game will be taken up more and more by them getting jumped by another group of Bounty Hunters, or another local Lawman who recognises them. If you just send these NPCs in, the PCs will gun them down but no amount of blaster fire or lucky rolls can remove those Obligation points.
     
    The PC will then, hopefully, start to learn how to work around the Obligation mechanic. They'll be looking for ways- none of which are openly violent- of reducing it. They'll also learn that they can't just kill people on a whim.
     
    Possibly your players are the sort who'll actually interpret this as just finding ways to kill people without getting Obligation. With the Bar Fight example, instead of pulling guns there and then, they follow their enemies afterward and murder them in a less public venue. After all, if nobody saw them- or, better yet, they frame someone else- they won't get Obligation: Wanted Killers for it. Which is still roleplaying of a sort, and an improvement on the current situation you seem to have.
     
    Remember- Obligation. The carrot and stick of EotE games. Make it work for you!
  25. Like
    Tantavalist got a reaction from Wincent in Earth in 40k?   
    Wow... I'd almost forgotten about this thread before someone worked their necromantic arts upon it. Time to make the post I'd thought about when I first read it, but then had eaten by forum errors when I tried to post it.
     
    Something that people should keep in mind is that the barrage of nuclear death fired at an incoming starship by modern day Earth isn't as feasible as people seem to be thinking.
     
    The only delivery system capable of hitting a space-based target would be an ICBM. In theory, these could achieve escape velocity and blast the RT's starship. In practice, that's not what they're designed for. They're meant to be fired at targets on the Earth's surface using a suborbital flight path. Also, going by the movement rates the game gives, even the slowest freighter could probably dodge aside from the missiles. Being intended to target stationary locations, ICBMs won't really have much in the way of course correction, so just moving out of the way will dodge them.
     
    Essentially, shooting down a starship with ICBMs would be like shooting down a helicopter with an anti-tank missile. In theory, you could do it. A few people have in fact tried it and got it to work. But you really wouldn't want to rely on it working as your main plan for survival.
     
    Now, modern technology probably could build something much more suited to target space-based enemies if there was a reason to do so. But there isn't such a reason. If the Rogue Trader didn't immediately conquer/destroy Earth, then ten years after the world'd governments realised they needed them, the barrages of hundreds of nukes ready to fly at any invaders would be sitting in silos all over the planet. But that assumes that they're given time to build these.
     
    Also, the idea of the modern world being willing to commit suicide by nuking the planet and denying an invader it as well it probably not realistic. "Give me Liberty or give me Death" is a nice slogan to fuel patriotic fantasies, but actually taking it to the logical extreme when liberty isn't an option any more is beyond most people. You'll decide that your own friends and family will all die as well, just to spite your enemy? That's something most people won't realistically do.
     
    And consider this- think about the people who currently run the world, the ones who'd have the authority to order the nuclear suicide- and the interests that control them. Really think about them. Then ask yourself- if a Rogue Trader told them he'd be willing to ensure they and their descendents had a position of power and wealth in the new regime if they co-operated in the takeover of the planet... Would you trust them not to sell out you and the rest of the population to live in the sort of hell the average Imperial citizen endures?
     
    The Imperium of Man has ten thousand years of experience in taking control of human-occupied planets, and outright war is only one of the tools in it's inventory, even if it is the favourite and most often used one.
     
    (And the forums went into some sort of maintenance state as I was in the process of typing this out- it's like someone doesn't want me to post this here...)
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