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Mickymonty

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  1. According to the DE codex, Comorragh has other races within it aside from the Dark Eldar themselves. Granted that many of these are either slaves, torture victims, or reluctant arena fighters, but there are also unscrupulous mercanaries who will work with the Dark Eldar for a short time. It is not totally outside the realms of possibility that a Chaos band could go there and come out with all of their organs intact, rather dependent on the local kabal, Dark Eldar noble, Hellion chief etc... they are consorting with. In the same way, a Dark Eldar would be able to travel with such a group for experience, or just the kick of it, especially if they were in a position of authority or need to get out of the dark city for a time.
  2. That's certainly a cool idea - a flying Fallen. I am uncertain though how physically mutated a Fallen would be. To the limits of my knowledge, as a long time 40K player if anything, was that the Fallen were propelled through time by the Chaos gods after the destruction of Caliban, and that they haven't simply been mooching around for 10,000 years! In terms of what that means with stats, you can certainly base them on a Chaos Space Marine profile, but because the corruption is inside, and therefore not always obvious (aside from the fact they are in black Dark Angels power armour, and are clearly not Ravenwing), you could incorporate rules from Deathwatch as well just as easily. Their former 'brother' marines in the Deathwing are on the hunt for them, and they are harder to root out simply because they look like a 'conventional' space marine. Having said all of this I do not yet have Black Crusade - it may well be that you all know something I don't - so you'll have to bear with my level of general ignorance!
  3. They will definitely seek to use innovations in technology, which is the big advantage they have over the hidebound lackies of the Imperium. There is no hard and fast rule over the range of an Ethereal's powers, but it is probably unlikely that the pheromone control would stretch across the void of space. There would have to be an Ethereal on board the ship, obviously along with a higher rank battlefield commander, let's assume a Shas'o. This individual, and any Shas'El subordinates might be armed with more exotic experimental weaponry. The Earth caste, although non-combative, would operate behind the lines engineers, constructing traps and helping to fortify kill zones against assault. Air caste Tau, notabe for their spindly frames, would fly assault craft and some may be stranded on the ship as well. Finally, any Water caste present could be used as intermediaries with Guel'a forces and if necessary as ambassadors in any negotiations with the enemy. In terms of the party's access; the navy, with their good relationship with the group Inquisitor, I am certain would happily allow them to assist, especially if the role of the Throne Agents could be kept relatively quiet. An assassinaton job would seem the best course for the party given the situation - they will want to do by stealth what the navy has been unable to manage by force. If it came to deployment of the Deathwatch - well, all bets are off as far as anyone else goes. The navy would be forced to stand down once the Astartes deploy - as simple as that. It may sour relations between the navy and the Inquisitor if the Space Marines go inin the long run however.
  4. The recent supplement for 'Deathwatch,' entitled 'Mark of the Xenos' has a really helpful section on Tau forces which you could field. My first tabletop army was Tau, and so I have a long lasting soft spot for them - here's what I think might be a likely military response: Kroot would be great in enclosed spaces and as swift response counter attacking troops for the Tau forces on the ship. They may also bring Kroot hounds with them for tight spaces with their ferocious attacks driving back naval armsmen, and softening up the enemy before a full Kroot counterstrike. Kroot teams can thus be used for hit and run, or even to hold the upper levels of the enginarium decks where they can dig in and snipe, being a constant nuisance to advancing humans. Vespid stingwings, though likely not deployed in a ship to ship action would probably appear in those large engine spaces, where they could deploy from above to take out heavy weapons teams with their crystal pulse weaponry. They would be able to move pretty quickly between slow moving machine parts to hit and run, like the Kroot. Don't discount the use of battlesuits (as if you could!). Crisis battesuits, armed with close range weaponry like flamers, burst cannons and fusion weapons would be pretty devastating, although the bulk of these suits makes their use in confined corridor spaces impossible. A more likely option might be stealth battlesuits, deployed with either fusion guns or burst cannons as appropriate. They are more heavily armoured than Pathfinders, but might usefully deploy with them where they can light up on any marker light targetted enemy with surprise. It is worth thinking on what the Tau Empire codex says on how Fire Warriors might behave in this situation tactically. Generally the Tau dislike this kind of 'siege' close combative warfare, but "on the rare occasions when the Tau are absolutely compelled to defend a vital resource, they will still apply their traditional techniques. In this case, the Mont'ka (killing blow tactic) is applied as lightning fast forays out of the defences, each aimed at killing the enemy that pose the greatest threat. The Kauyon (patient hunter tactic) is represented by a feigned retreat from the perimeter to draw the attacker into a well-prepared kill zone (Tau Codex page 12)." You could see that ambushing the enemy and crushing them with a quick counter might be the way the Tau would apply these tactics. They might make use of sniper drones on long corridors to blow holes in front-armoured assault troops, and would seed spaces with traps and ready fast moving troops to sweep in and mop up. They are very reluctant to waste Fire warrior troops in pointless attrition with the more numerous forces at the disposal of the Imperium, and this may explain their lack of success or will to really push into the crew decks. Another thing worth considering is whether or not there is an Ethereal present (more than likely somewhere?). Without one of the Aun present the Tau would begin to regress, becoming more aggressive and less heeding of their philosophys. They might end up attacking their own auxilaries, like Guel'a, and would be more inclined to counter the enemy into close combat, where they would fare less well. With an Ethereal present they would fight all the harder the closer to their commander the fight came and this character would represent a high priority kill target for a group of throne agents.
  5. IraShaine1972 said: I must agree. Baratheon and Greyjoy are the other factions of the War of the 5 Kings. Nothing else would make sense given that TWot5K is the context of the game at this point. Although the game contains characters that never fought in the war (Eddard). For the very reason you cite above, I think although the chronological release makes a lot of sense, fans of the books and the HBO series would not have their noses put out of joint too much if they widened the scope and created some 'hypothetical' situations as well. It's possible they could rework some of the forces under Renly Baratheon - after all, he had an unusual mixture of allies during his approach towards King's Landing, and seeing them getting an opportunity to fight the Lannisters would be quite fun, if nothing else. I agree with the idea that House Greyjoy seems a good next release, with reavers and iron born stomping around the battlefield - but how about more 'historical' battles too for the diehard fans of the books, like the Battle of the Trident between Robert Baratheon / Ned Stark and Rhaegar Targaryen? In fact, even Daenerys' force, released in advance of her likely return to Westeros would be great - but maybe that's heresy? Or, has anyone considered the Night's Watch, and the Wildlings? This would allow for some changes in the terrain and basic board too.
  6. I don't know if anyone has already considered this on either site - but how good would a marriage of these two games be(that is, Battles of Westeros and A Game of Thrones)? You would use Game of Thrones as a campaign map, jockeying for position with your units, and then, dependent on the amount of forces fielded, play a Battles of Westeros set-up to resolve the outcome. I imagine you would need some means of working out the lay-out of the terrain thatwould be equitable, and a suitable set-up to enable the game to be played out as a straightforward skirmish battle, an ambush perhaps or some other situation that would suit with the location and predominant terrain. The Storm of Swords expansion for A Game of thrones would be even better suited because of its focus on the area around the Riverlands, and its specific focus (or at least closer focus) on Lannister and Stark. The significant problem is that BoW does not provide models for Baratheon, Greyjoy, Tyrell, Frey, Martell, Arryn etc... - and so this is not something that you could do immediately - but the use of these two systems together would seem like a grand project! What do aGoT players think?
  7. I don't know if anyone has already considered this on either site - but how good would a marriage of these two games be(that is, Battles of Westeros and A Game of Thrones)? You would use Game of Thrones as a campaign map, jockeying for position with your units, and then, dependent on the amount of forces fielded, play a Battles of Westeros set-up to resolve the outcome. I imagine you would need some means of working out the lay-out of the terrain thatwould be equitable, and a suitable set-up to enable the game to be played out as a straightforward skirmish battle, an ambush perhaps or some other situation that would suit with the location and predominant terrain. The Storm of Swords expansion for A Game of thrones would be even better suited because of its focus on the area around the Riverlands, and its specific focus (or at least closer focus) on Lannister and Stark. The significant problem is that BoW does not provide models for Baratheon, Greyjoy, Tyrell, Frey, Martell, Arryn etc... - and so this is not something that you could do immediately - but the use of these two systems together would seem like a grand project! What do BoW players think?
  8. DragonWhimsy said: On a random note, Addam Marbrand (Warrior of Ashenmark) is my favorite commander in the core game. He's not flashy like some of the others but he's just a solid and dependable commander who always seems to play an important role in my strategies. Though of course you use him in almost all of the battles in the core game. Just last night it was his cavalry wing that flanked the Starks and captured Catelyn Stark in sceanrio five, and also killed the last Stark Unit to give me the 5 VP's I needed to activate the instant win condition. Go go House Marbrand! I couldn't agree more! In scenario 1 it was Marbrand's cavalry which raced across the river on the final turn to ****** the objective I needed for a Lannister victory - to the complete chagrine of my dumbfounded opponents - in scenario 2, it was Marbrand's unit that managed to destroy the Stark cavalry holding one of the fords, and then tie up Rickard Karstark's 'deathstar' unit in the dying turns of the battle, and in scenario three it was Marbrand's cavalry that routed the last Kennelmaster's unit, thus securing a Lannister instant victory. All in all, considering I have only played these three scenarios, he would seem to be the dog's proverbials.
  9. I have to agree with much of the speculation. There will always be room for plenty of new scenarios - as this is the finite part of the game's replayability, and the cards and extra counters to go with them. I quite fancy the idea that particular narratives would utilise certain characters, but can also appreciate that this limits the ability of players to select their own party. I also quite like the idea of some of the more 'mainstream' nasties coming in, Byakhee, Ghouls, Elder Things, Great Race of Yith and Deep Ones being possible, but with some of the bigger, fearsome Lovecraftian horrors, like Gugs or Lloigor (perhaps a little too large or conceptual to make an appearance). Could they do a 'Colour Out of Space!?' I think that a release schedule like that for Arkham Horror would work very well, with some bigger box releases interspersed with smaller card and scenario releases. More special effect tokens and rules, as well as MORE PUZZLES (one of the parts of the game my group seem to really enjoy).
  10. Let's hope the word 'Nerdrage' makes the OED - I think the rest of the English speaking world needs to fear its wrath too.
  11. ak-73 said: tkis said: MILLANDSON said: You mean it's bad for you, rather than it's bad for all customers. Some people will only ever buy one of the corebooks, and under the current system they would only need to buy one book. In your system, they would have to buy two. Plus, it is well known that corebooks sell the best of any RPG books, as they are the only books that are required to run the game. Any subsequent supplements sell at an increasingly decreasing rate, due to so many people never getting anything other than the corebook. Not saying that it doesn't work (as it does for other companies), but just because you don't like it doesn't mean it isn't good for customers of one stripe or another. If i am able to buy two books for a total of 60$ and would need to shell around 30-35$ out for future rule and background expansions instead of buying one book for 60$ and paying 60$ for expansions i would go with the first option. Is there a different way to do this equation? I am not aware of one. And that is even before the "better integration of system expansions" argument comes into play. Ripping off customers on 20$ to 30$ is a sound business decision though, in response to Alex´s original post. It is especially sound if customers are dumb enough to let it be done not twice or thrice, but four times over by now An alternative product model does exist, and is very successfull, claiming it to be subpar for the customer, without doing the equation seems weird. I for my part have decided to definitely not buy it, because of the reasons stated. It is a clear rip off decision which i will not support. I'm seeing it from a different perspective: a) when DH came out it was a huge success. It was the 40K RPG. All further systems have diluted the brand of it somewhat. In fact newer stuff tends to make older stuff look obsolere, although it's a perfectly good game. b) At some point gamers realize the way things work: FFG bring out a new product line, publishes some material and then moves its main attention to a new product line. Will BC the last system for 40K RP? Or will there be a new core rulebook every year? If so, how can they still support the older games? Every further system will end up marginalizing one's own favourite game more in attention and ressources. To make a long story short, I am not sure how appreciative gamers will be if they come under the impression that FFG does effectively system hopping, always on the run, always dishing out new RPG systems because the core rulebooks always sell best. If they leave the older systems more or less in the dust, why bother with a new system that is soon to get neglected also? I'm not saying the latter is the case or necessarily will be the case but it's a legitimate concern to have with the strategy pursued. And let me just re-iterate again that from a gamers pov being able roleplay Chaos is a boon. Aöex I am not sure if I agree with your premise that the DH line is unsupported. Firstly, because it was the first of the 40K role-play line it does have a multitude of existing material - perhaps with more 'Ancension' level material needed being the only quibble - and the product release still seems healthy, with multiple scenario releases, and the recent 'Blood of Martyrs' release. I think FFG have done a good job of paying attention to all three lines thus far - although I can see more attention on DW as it has the fewest current products. And I don't see the other RPGs as diluting the line at all - if anything they provide more diversity to the 40K role-playing experience, and offer opportunities for mixing the systems. However, it would have been better to have had one system core rulebook, and supplements for the various different systems that now exist - in essence just like many other RPG systems already do, even the TT game follows that principle (well, almost).
  12. Pretty good I'd say! I liked your points about the Chaos gods themselves - very true that they have become quite static in their own right, but that essentially chaos is impossible for humans to comprehend - a cosmic truth too twisted to fully realise. I think your analogy about 'freedom fighters' as opposed to 'terrorists' reveals the way in which a chaos cultist would most likely see themselves. Principles like freedom from oppressive laws, freedom of speech, even freedom of worship are things we take for granted - in the 41st Millenium desiring these things will pretty quickly get you labelled a heretic - so, from here it is easy to see why humans get lured into worshipping chaos, and descend in the way you have suggested. In that sense you are also right to say there is no simple good / evil here - and that creating that uncertainty is key to playing and enjoying this role-play game (well, maybe not the only reason!).
  13. Dulahan said: Polaria said: Read the sources, I say Necron Warriors and other "basic goon" -types are not much different... Lords and Pariahs, however, are a whole other ballgame. Lords have enough intelligence and personality to infiltrate inside Inquisition and turn humans against each other (as described in Xenology) and Pariahs can do pretty much everything any human can (as shown in Dawn of War). Moreover Necrons have several human and non-human cults dedicated in their worship (as described in Codex Necrons). So, in actuality, they are extremely viable RP opponents once you read all the sources and get over the "OMG they are all stoopid zombies" -stereotype. Exactly my point. Just because the mooks aren't, doesn't mean there aren't agencies tied to them who aren't too. And those agencies are the sort of thing that makes even the Chaos Gods a bit uneasy. Unstoppable, seemingly endless mechanical things that are a mystery? Yeah, you bet your britches I can think of a lot of good games to run revolving around them. Especially for Chaos. The Dark Mechanicum should have a lot of fun with those. First up, I fully endorse these points here, and as a Necron TT player already, have a soft spot for these evil rust-buckets too. The villain in Xenology was a real eye-opener to the potential of Necrons as viable and really nasty villains - awesomely intelligent, able to 'take on the flesh' of humans, using the kinds of technologies and mind tricks that can undermine an Inquisitor and play to the foolish desires and wants of humans, and utterly without compassion. If you are looking for a villain for an apocalyptically themed game (actually most 40K games are pretty apocalyptic!) then I really like the idea of a Necron baddie. Nids are pretty ordinary in comparison - they do not have this level of subterfuge - but 'Crons, with their anti-chaos / warp technology are very scary - they have influence over elements of the Mechanicus, use technologies that are virtually unknown in the 41st Millenium, and pre-date / are possibly superior to that possessed by the Eldar, invalidate the technologies of Callidus assassins (I think that's right), have played with the Pariah gene and mastered the art of fusing Necron and human together - and they serve the nastiest bunch of bad guys in the galaxy. What's not to like?
  14. In the 41st Millenium, anyone considered a recidivist let's say by the incredibly harsh legal doctrines of the time may well fit into this category. It is a very short step for some to be considered an 'outsider' by the Imperium to then be considered a 'heretic' by the Imperium. I can imagine this role-play game exploring that tenuous divide as much as actual screaming cultists and such. Other systems, perhaps most obviously to my mind, Call of Cthulhu have been exploring this area of moral abiguity and 'shade of grey' for some time - often a cultist becomes that through a particular obsession with a person or situation which can only be resolved through selling their soul and gaining the power to change their fate - a little Faustian perhaps. Sometimes the original reasons are noble, but the subversion to a lost servant of chaos can take many years or centuries even - the chaos gods have eternity, after all, to claim what's theirs. In the same way that a radical Inquisitor (i.e like Gregor Eisenhorn) can cross the divide and end up utilising, if not openly trucking with the Ruinous Powers through originally noble reasons, so can space marines (i.e. Alpharius / Omegon of the Alpha Legion) too. I think that this game will have a lot of playability. It's not as simple as just playing the bad guy - it's playing with a whole new system of values if you like - by the standards of normal humans warped and depraved, but I guess not if seen from the other side perhaps. Life, no matter how warped, surely becomes 'normal' to you if you live it all the time? Incidentally - how about a villain like Kaiser Söze? Wouldn't he be cool to play in this style of game?
  15. It even has hairs on the flayed cover that prickle up when it's a bit parky. I am glad to see that FFG can simultaneously cater to both fine production standards and voluntary euthanasia at the same time.
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