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Callidon

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  1. Like
    Callidon reacted to BrashFink in BrashFink's Bennie Deck...   
    Here is a "Bennie Deck" to be used in the "Savage Worlds RPG" tradition when your players do something outstanding... but use it however you see fit.
     
    Features:
     
    Two Card Backs: The Falcon & Slave Leia (your choice)
     
    54 Cards: They follow standard playing cards (plus jokers). The cards also have their respective playing card symbols, allowing them to be used as normal playing cards, or other creative uses.
     
    2 Sizes: 300 & 150 dpi for printing or online use
     
    9 Card Types: Boost, Setback, Upgrade, Downgrade, Move, Damage, Soak, Strain & Special - Each type is a different color.
     
    Symbols: Each color type has a symbol (shield, triumph, disadvantage, etc). This just meant to represent the card type, but you could use them in other creative ways... draw and use the symbol, etc.
     
    Different Rarity: Each card type has 3 common, 2 uncommon, 1 Rare - also each Ace is a Special card.
     
    BRASHFINK'S BENNIE DECK
     
     
     
    Sample:

  2. Like
    Callidon got a reaction from MILLANDSON in Obligation, Duty, and...   
    Hankerin' s?
     
    Baller Status?
     
    Thetans?
  3. Like
    Callidon reacted to FangGrip in Obligation, Duty, and...   
    Nope.  It all depends on where they put the balance for that game.  More force info may send it there, but I think Destiny is a more likely prospect.
     
    That, and I hope somebody gets a piercing.  
  4. Like
    Callidon got a reaction from tgoVIPER in Obligation, Duty, and...   
    Hankerin' s?
     
    Baller Status?
     
    Thetans?
  5. Like
    Callidon reacted to Tenrousei in Can fringers use Google?   
    This question came up in our group on Saturday.  We discussed it and I ruled in favor of the original three movies.  Networks of information "internets" are local to a system, depending on the development of that system.  I'll get with them and fill them in on the Holonet, but let them know that it is similar to the internet in China, there but very heavily monitored/restricted.
  6. Like
    Callidon reacted to torquemadaza in Can fringers use Google?   
    Just because you can google "New York Stock Exchange", doesn't mean you understand (or have knowledge) on how the markets work. And a little bit more on point... you can watch a 10 minute movie from a guy called Dave on youtube as to how to invest in the market, and you'd be an idiot to follow his advice. And just one more example: I needed the help of my mum who is a great cook (she has "Knowledge: French & Swedish cuisine" you could say) to help me search the interwebs (using my "Computer" skill) for a traditional Swedish Cucumber Salad. There were dozens of recipes, most were Americanised versions and not quite right, but with my google kung fu I eventually found recipes written in Swedish (used google translate on portions of the ingredient list) so that she could confirm what was the recipe she remembers making back in the 60s and 70s in Sweden. I would have found a recipe... but I wouldn't have known which was the actual traditional Swedish recipe as made by Swedes in Sweden, that required my mum's "knowledge".
     
    It's important to understand the difference between information (Apple stock went up), and knowledge (they just bought a VR company). It isn't that the latter isn't on the net, its just that everything is on the net and knowing what is important requires knowledge.
     
    I'd be very careful to allow any skill to do the work of another. The computer literate slicer should never overshadow the knowledge skills of the scholar. If you have both players in your game, get them to work together. The slicer hacks in (make a check), finds what she thinks is the right info, but the scholar reading over her shoulder directs her to the meat of the data and has to confirm the veracity of said information (make a check). They work well as a team. If the slicer is alone with the computer, then maybe she copies a whole lot of stuff onto her data pad before meeting back up with the scholar. "I didn't know what would be important, so I brought it all back for you to look through." 
     
    As knowledge skills can be generally weak in most rpgs (as a result of GMs not using them in interesting ways), I like them to be as expansive as possible and am usually quite lenient as to when a player wants to make a check. Knowledge checks shouldn't be required to provide the information to move the plot forward (what if they fail), but they should be used to provide tangible benefits that help the players in ways that otherwise just wouldn't exist if not for that character's knowledge skill choices. 
  7. Like
    Callidon got a reaction from Rikoshi in Tracking the "path" through Talent trees   
    I've got some basic ones in greyscale that make tracking talent paths and ranked skills fairly painless. Link is in my sig.
  8. Like
    Callidon got a reaction from Reydan in Switching Careers   
    Han Solo & Lando Calrissian :-)
  9. Like
    Callidon got a reaction from Sinosaur in Switching Careers   
    Han Solo & Lando Calrissian :-)
  10. Like
    Callidon got a reaction from Doc, the Weasel in Switching Careers   
    Han Solo & Lando Calrissian :-)
  11. Like
    Callidon reacted to DVeight in Cover and Armor   
    Agreed. That's an important factor. If you house rule this then everyone from minions to nemesis will get the benefit as well. That has a potential ( I think guarantee) to prolong the encounters. What I have been finding is that the encounters have been, to date, very fast and furious stuff. Guys have been getting up and standing around the table as the anxiety raises cause it can go either way and very quickly. Then its over as fast as it began and they are smoking cigars at the local cantina reminiscing about their recent escapade. Keep in mind, this is a narrative game first, tactical game last.
     
    But each to his own.
  12. Like
    Callidon reacted to osu4fan in Utinni Talent - Outlaw Tech   
    Whenever you use this talent at my table you have to say UTINNI! just like a jawa.
  13. Like
    Callidon reacted to Skie in So I had a problem with Space Combat yesterday...   
    Unless the combat is taking place in empty space, piloting a speed-less-than-4 vehicle is a bit boring. But you can try to clutter the battlefield a bit - asteroids, old space junk, satellites, other spacecraft - and then encourage the pilot to try to crash the enemies into the obstacles. Film example: Han diving into the trench on the big asteroid. 
    Most battles take place near planets (at least in my experience), so there should be a lot of stuff floating around!
  14. Like
    Callidon got a reaction from BrashFink in Age of Rebellion Beta a go!   
    GAHHHHH!
     

  15. Like
    Callidon got a reaction from SadPolarBear in Age of Rebellion Beta a go!   
    GAHHHHH!
     

  16. Like
    Callidon reacted to Doc, the Weasel in Session 0 - Involving Players in Campaign Creation   
    So here is how I plan to run Session 0. 

     

    I created some Setting Creation Sheets to help guide this process.

     

    This may seem too structured for some, but it doesn't have to be. I'm giving it this much of a system so that if things start to slow down, I can point to the next action and move to it rather than wait for someone to do something. If the group starts writing stuff on their own, without turns or anything, then I'm going to let them.

     

    I do have some rules.

     

    1. Everyone participates

    No one can leave the session without adding one setting detail. I'm not worried about this, but some groups may be.

     

    2. Everyone gets at least one thing they want

    If everyone wants criminals as NPCs but just one player wants some Imperial antagonists, that person gets one. The fun part is then as a group fitting the seemingly odd piece into the greater setting.

     

    3. Everything someone creates is shared

    I don't want someone writing stuff out in their corner, without engaging the group. They have to put it out there for everyone to see and react to. That may lead to dialogue about how to improve the idea, or it could lead to someone figuring out a connection between it and something else. 

     

    4. The GM is a participant (and just a participant)

    This isn't ONLY owned by the players. The GM has to play with this material too, so they should have as much say as the other players, and gets a turn like everyone else. That said, the GM does not get veto power over the group in this instance. If everyone else wants something, they get it.

     

    5. Anything left blank is the GM's

    If there is a detail not filled in by the group, the GM will do it on his/her own. As a player, you may not like the outcome.

     

     

    With that in mind, here's the system:

     

    Step 1. Discuss Overall Direction of Game

    Is this a full on criminal group, or are they legit traders? Maybe they are somewhere in the middle. Do they take odd jobs, or do they have a single employer?

     

    For my group, I'm just going to ask them to choose 1-5, with 1 being totally legit, 5 being totally criminal, and 3 being a mix. This is more for them to work it out amongst themselves before making characters, so my involvement will be minimal.

     

    Step 2. Roll Obligation

    For people used to the standard character creation method, this may seem out of order but it really doesn't have an impact on character creation. Not a negative one, at least.

     

    Why I want to do this first is so that when the group is creating the NPCs and locations, they are doing so with an eye out for connections to their characters. 

     

    Step 3: Select/Create Planet(s)

    This is more about broad strokes than specifics (though you can jump to specifics if your group is ready). The goal here is to look at what kinds of settings the group wants to play in. Do they want a city planet like Coruscant, or a wasteland like Tatooine? Are they canon planets, or are they invented?

     

    Step 4: Create NPCs and Locations

    This is the meat of Session 0. 

     

    In turn each player creates one NPC and/or location.  Ideally, they create an NPC with some details, and then a place to find them. If that's not possible, or they don't have any ideas, or they are tying their idea to an existing location or NPC, then no worries. 

     

    After everyone has had one turn, continue, but now after making an NPC or location, you should also make a connection between NPCs (or locations if it makes sense). This connection does not need to involve what you just created. Maybe you want two existing smuggler NPCs to hate each other, or maybe you want a forbidden love between Rebel and Imperial agents. You could also just see an NPC and make a friend or rival for them (making the new NPC and connection at once). The more conflict you create here, the better. 

     

    There are going to be more ideas thrown out there than just the individual NPCs and locations. Maybe the NPCs are part of an organization, or maybe the locations belong to a single city that needs some detailing. Let that all flow and write it all down. 

     

    In the attachment, I have some sections labeled "details • choose x" in which the creator has to choose that many of those details to fill in. They are free to add more, or someone else could do so, but that's the bare minimum.

     

    Continue this until you have close to your target number of NPCs and Locations. For my session, I'm aiming for 12 of each. Don't worry about hitting those numbers exactly, just use them as a ballpark. If I end up with 9 locations and 13 NPCs with an awesome story then it's a victory.

     

    Step 4a: Tie Obligations into NPCs

    While this is all going on, players should be thinking of – and talking about – which NPCs play into their Obligations. This may change as the session moves on, but it should be settled before the end of Step 4.

     

    Step 4b: Develop Themes and Issues

    After a while, there should be enough material to start looking at the big picture. What are the major issues on a planet – or at least which issues will the game be dealing with. By thinking about these things, we can not only create something more than a random group of unrelated NPCs, but the issue itself can be used as inspiration for what NPCs/locations the setting is lacking.

     

    In the end, you want to have 2-3 issues per planet by the end of Step 4.

     

    Step 4: Create Characters

    After having made the setting and connected the Obligations to people, now make the characters. Once you have them, you have everything you need to create a campaign.

     

     

    What do you all think? Are there any things I'm missing. Does anyone have any suggestions?

     

    My plan is to try this out Saturday (schedules willing). I'll post our results and share any insights.

  17. Like
    Callidon got a reaction from Nashable in How do you select non-human names?   
    I tend to go with real world names and then mash them up until they sound alien.  Rodians work great by starting with an Italian name or word, then you stomp on it until it sounds right.  Twi'leks work well with albanian words or names the same way. 
     
    Google Translate is your friend as well. 
     
    Going with the Rodian to Italian thing
    Leaper = Saltatore ...grind it up... Salto Toray
     
    Twi'leks from Albanian
    Dumpling = Trashaluq ...grind it up... Tras Haluk
     
    YMMV
  18. Like
    Callidon reacted to Doc, the Weasel in Printable talent trees   
    Here is the black and white version for any interested: https://www.dropbox.com/s/jxbhxtzmwj0l5yo/TalentTrees-BW.pdf
  19. Like
    Callidon got a reaction from SassyBRowncoat in Narrative Interpretation - Final Results or Results by Die?   
    We interpret pools at the end result, not as each aggregate die is rolled.
     
    If narrative fatigue is working its way into your sessions then consider that you may be asking for checks and rolls too often out of combat.  For example, there's no need to have everyone roll perception checks at every hallway intersection in a dungeon installation crawl stroll.  I borrow a little of Burning Wheel's "Let it Ride" with Edge of the Empire, where a test result holds until the conditions or situation changes in such a way that a new roll is warranted.  Otherwise we continue on abiding by the results of the previous check.  And when the whole party may have rolled a check in d20 star wars, pair it down to one roller with assistance from the others for EotE.  That way you aren't trying to determine how to apply a Triumph from two or three players at a time in the same situation.
     
    Combat has the highest density of rolls in any game, and EotE is no different.  Let the narrative stuff happen when it happens.  Don't force it, or it'll be like having someone stand over your shoulder yelling "SING PRETTY!!!!" all the time (I mean...I DO have the dulcid tones of an angel, but a kid can't perform all the time).    Don't feel bad about getting mechanical with applications of Advantage, Threat, Despair and Triumph in combat.  Trying to make every blaster bolt and swing of a sword into something that the Ugnaught Spacebards will oink of for a thousand generations is going to wear anyone out.  Despair and Triumph do lend themselves to a little special consideration, but deciding on a weapon jam or a crit isn't going to get anyone lynched for badwrongfun.  
     
    One thing I have done to keep myself and my players from slipping into mechanical adjustment complacency is to querry before results are applied with "anyone got anything cool to add before we dive in?"  I'd say that about 1 in 4 combat rolls results in someone at the table seeing a pile of net Threat or Advantage and going "OH dude....I totally got something."  And of course there are going to be some combat encounters that just have a certain je ne sais quoi about them, where narrative interpretations and inspiration flow easy.
  20. Like
    Callidon got a reaction from Nashable in Narrative Interpretation - Final Results or Results by Die?   
    We interpret pools at the end result, not as each aggregate die is rolled.
     
    If narrative fatigue is working its way into your sessions then consider that you may be asking for checks and rolls too often out of combat.  For example, there's no need to have everyone roll perception checks at every hallway intersection in a dungeon installation crawl stroll.  I borrow a little of Burning Wheel's "Let it Ride" with Edge of the Empire, where a test result holds until the conditions or situation changes in such a way that a new roll is warranted.  Otherwise we continue on abiding by the results of the previous check.  And when the whole party may have rolled a check in d20 star wars, pair it down to one roller with assistance from the others for EotE.  That way you aren't trying to determine how to apply a Triumph from two or three players at a time in the same situation.
     
    Combat has the highest density of rolls in any game, and EotE is no different.  Let the narrative stuff happen when it happens.  Don't force it, or it'll be like having someone stand over your shoulder yelling "SING PRETTY!!!!" all the time (I mean...I DO have the dulcid tones of an angel, but a kid can't perform all the time).    Don't feel bad about getting mechanical with applications of Advantage, Threat, Despair and Triumph in combat.  Trying to make every blaster bolt and swing of a sword into something that the Ugnaught Spacebards will oink of for a thousand generations is going to wear anyone out.  Despair and Triumph do lend themselves to a little special consideration, but deciding on a weapon jam or a crit isn't going to get anyone lynched for badwrongfun.  
     
    One thing I have done to keep myself and my players from slipping into mechanical adjustment complacency is to querry before results are applied with "anyone got anything cool to add before we dive in?"  I'd say that about 1 in 4 combat rolls results in someone at the table seeing a pile of net Threat or Advantage and going "OH dude....I totally got something."  And of course there are going to be some combat encounters that just have a certain je ne sais quoi about them, where narrative interpretations and inspiration flow easy.
  21. Like
    Callidon got a reaction from Doc, the Weasel in Narrative Interpretation - Final Results or Results by Die?   
    We interpret pools at the end result, not as each aggregate die is rolled.
     
    If narrative fatigue is working its way into your sessions then consider that you may be asking for checks and rolls too often out of combat.  For example, there's no need to have everyone roll perception checks at every hallway intersection in a dungeon installation crawl stroll.  I borrow a little of Burning Wheel's "Let it Ride" with Edge of the Empire, where a test result holds until the conditions or situation changes in such a way that a new roll is warranted.  Otherwise we continue on abiding by the results of the previous check.  And when the whole party may have rolled a check in d20 star wars, pair it down to one roller with assistance from the others for EotE.  That way you aren't trying to determine how to apply a Triumph from two or three players at a time in the same situation.
     
    Combat has the highest density of rolls in any game, and EotE is no different.  Let the narrative stuff happen when it happens.  Don't force it, or it'll be like having someone stand over your shoulder yelling "SING PRETTY!!!!" all the time (I mean...I DO have the dulcid tones of an angel, but a kid can't perform all the time).    Don't feel bad about getting mechanical with applications of Advantage, Threat, Despair and Triumph in combat.  Trying to make every blaster bolt and swing of a sword into something that the Ugnaught Spacebards will oink of for a thousand generations is going to wear anyone out.  Despair and Triumph do lend themselves to a little special consideration, but deciding on a weapon jam or a crit isn't going to get anyone lynched for badwrongfun.  
     
    One thing I have done to keep myself and my players from slipping into mechanical adjustment complacency is to querry before results are applied with "anyone got anything cool to add before we dive in?"  I'd say that about 1 in 4 combat rolls results in someone at the table seeing a pile of net Threat or Advantage and going "OH dude....I totally got something."  And of course there are going to be some combat encounters that just have a certain je ne sais quoi about them, where narrative interpretations and inspiration flow easy.
  22. Like
    Callidon got a reaction from Drewster27 in Narrative Interpretation - Final Results or Results by Die?   
    We interpret pools at the end result, not as each aggregate die is rolled.
     
    If narrative fatigue is working its way into your sessions then consider that you may be asking for checks and rolls too often out of combat.  For example, there's no need to have everyone roll perception checks at every hallway intersection in a dungeon installation crawl stroll.  I borrow a little of Burning Wheel's "Let it Ride" with Edge of the Empire, where a test result holds until the conditions or situation changes in such a way that a new roll is warranted.  Otherwise we continue on abiding by the results of the previous check.  And when the whole party may have rolled a check in d20 star wars, pair it down to one roller with assistance from the others for EotE.  That way you aren't trying to determine how to apply a Triumph from two or three players at a time in the same situation.
     
    Combat has the highest density of rolls in any game, and EotE is no different.  Let the narrative stuff happen when it happens.  Don't force it, or it'll be like having someone stand over your shoulder yelling "SING PRETTY!!!!" all the time (I mean...I DO have the dulcid tones of an angel, but a kid can't perform all the time).    Don't feel bad about getting mechanical with applications of Advantage, Threat, Despair and Triumph in combat.  Trying to make every blaster bolt and swing of a sword into something that the Ugnaught Spacebards will oink of for a thousand generations is going to wear anyone out.  Despair and Triumph do lend themselves to a little special consideration, but deciding on a weapon jam or a crit isn't going to get anyone lynched for badwrongfun.  
     
    One thing I have done to keep myself and my players from slipping into mechanical adjustment complacency is to querry before results are applied with "anyone got anything cool to add before we dive in?"  I'd say that about 1 in 4 combat rolls results in someone at the table seeing a pile of net Threat or Advantage and going "OH dude....I totally got something."  And of course there are going to be some combat encounters that just have a certain je ne sais quoi about them, where narrative interpretations and inspiration flow easy.
  23. Like
    Callidon got a reaction from Rikoshi in Narrative Interpretation - Final Results or Results by Die?   
    We interpret pools at the end result, not as each aggregate die is rolled.
     
    If narrative fatigue is working its way into your sessions then consider that you may be asking for checks and rolls too often out of combat.  For example, there's no need to have everyone roll perception checks at every hallway intersection in a dungeon installation crawl stroll.  I borrow a little of Burning Wheel's "Let it Ride" with Edge of the Empire, where a test result holds until the conditions or situation changes in such a way that a new roll is warranted.  Otherwise we continue on abiding by the results of the previous check.  And when the whole party may have rolled a check in d20 star wars, pair it down to one roller with assistance from the others for EotE.  That way you aren't trying to determine how to apply a Triumph from two or three players at a time in the same situation.
     
    Combat has the highest density of rolls in any game, and EotE is no different.  Let the narrative stuff happen when it happens.  Don't force it, or it'll be like having someone stand over your shoulder yelling "SING PRETTY!!!!" all the time (I mean...I DO have the dulcid tones of an angel, but a kid can't perform all the time).    Don't feel bad about getting mechanical with applications of Advantage, Threat, Despair and Triumph in combat.  Trying to make every blaster bolt and swing of a sword into something that the Ugnaught Spacebards will oink of for a thousand generations is going to wear anyone out.  Despair and Triumph do lend themselves to a little special consideration, but deciding on a weapon jam or a crit isn't going to get anyone lynched for badwrongfun.  
     
    One thing I have done to keep myself and my players from slipping into mechanical adjustment complacency is to querry before results are applied with "anyone got anything cool to add before we dive in?"  I'd say that about 1 in 4 combat rolls results in someone at the table seeing a pile of net Threat or Advantage and going "OH dude....I totally got something."  And of course there are going to be some combat encounters that just have a certain je ne sais quoi about them, where narrative interpretations and inspiration flow easy.
  24. Like
    Callidon reacted to Dex Vulen in How do you select non-human names?   
    Nice guys!  As I was driving home a bit ago I was struck with the idea of using the Bushmen of the Kalahari language.  Ended up using the Khoikhoi information I ran across and ran with, Nate's approach.
     
    Uu'Tizo V'uz 
     
    Meh... could be worse
  25. Like
    Callidon got a reaction from Dex Vulen in How do you select non-human names?   
    For Gand, maybe start with russian words...then mash them around and reconfigure.  So in the end you get names that can be chirped, clicked and buzzed.  Such as:  Pomschnik, Zamestisii, Libaroknit, Boubazzid, Ukryvatzo
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