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anvil240

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  1. Like
    anvil240 got a reaction from Derelius in So long, and thanks for all the fish   
    Complicated? Not necessarily. Poorly organized, oh yeah. I found myself putting around 10 hours of prep before each 4 hour game session just looking up special abilities. I guess I'm more of an old school guy. We are switching to Castles & Crusades, which is pretty darn uncomplicated. That 10:4 ratio above is also why I switched from D&D 3.x. Once I drew that conclusion the writing was on the wall. Funny thing is, I absolutely love being a PC in Deathwatch. Now if only my layabout friends would run it...
  2. Like
    anvil240 got a reaction from Lynata in So long, and thanks for all the fish   
    Complicated? Not necessarily. Poorly organized, oh yeah. I found myself putting around 10 hours of prep before each 4 hour game session just looking up special abilities. I guess I'm more of an old school guy. We are switching to Castles & Crusades, which is pretty darn uncomplicated. That 10:4 ratio above is also why I switched from D&D 3.x. Once I drew that conclusion the writing was on the wall. Funny thing is, I absolutely love being a PC in Deathwatch. Now if only my layabout friends would run it...
  3. Like
    anvil240 reacted to Amaimon in So long, and thanks for all the fish   
    SM special rules are a piece of cake, and they are written on your character sheet. Try remembering squad and solo modes, cohesion rules, oath taking (and what comes with each oath etc, add errata to that)
  4. Like
    anvil240 reacted to Professor Tanhauser in So long, and thanks for all the fish   
    I may get flamers or even melta guns fired at me for this, but I don't really consider the DW game system all that complicated.

    I like GURPS as a system (Prepares to leap into adamantium plated bunker while rest of board members are still stunned.) and in fact would have stayed with gurps if the guy running the company that makes it hadn't turned out to be a TEXAS SIZED ahole along with too many of the other company.

    So to me the DW system just isn't that complex. (Jumps into armored bunked and slams hatch even as the first frag grenade lands at his feet.)
  5. Like
    anvil240 reacted to Lynata in So long, and thanks for all the fish   
    I definitely agree about the rules being a bit too spread out, which is one of the disadvantages especially with "rules-heavy" (aka clunky) systems such as these, but other than that it sounds as if your problems stem largely from the people you're playing with.
     
    Maybe some day you'd like to try again with a different group? Or maybe try one of the other, slightly less clunky 40k games such as 2E Dark Heresy. I know one of the things that immediately caused me a headache was that just playing the Astartes "race" burdens a player with an entire page full of special rules to keep in mind. I mean, I kinda appreciate the attention to detail, but this is the most obvious example of where FFG's 40k games overdid it, especially when it's applied so uneven throughout the systems.
     
    Best of luck either way! There's certainly other cool games out there, too.
  6. Like
    anvil240 got a reaction from DariusAPB in Running a campaign as a Space Marine Tactical Squad.   
    The point buy system is in the little box in the upper right hand corner of page 26 of the Deathwatch rule book.
  7. Like
    anvil240 reacted to htsmithium in You Know You're Playing Deathwatch When...   
    I'm running a game atm and this is fairly common, room only 4X4 meters? are you only 1 meter away? are your squad mates in CC already? no prob, chuck a frag! Has to role almost perfect damage to hurt you anyway.  The only reason the assault marine does not start combat my punching things with grenades is because her giant, un-powed claymore  just murders everything faster. 
     
    Oh and to add my own: When a melee mini-boss human officer is able to survive the initial hit it makes your day.  When he actually does a point of damage with his shock maul it's like a xeno blessed miracle, and when your player just smiles because they get to test against shock damage at over 100...yeah, there was no second hit 
  8. Like
    anvil240 reacted to Praetor in your favorite type and chapter marine for DW?   
    I have always wanted to play a gregarious, charismatic Ultramarine Tactical marine that is basically a Cohesion battery.  I want to make him so friendly that it's hard for people to reasonably dislike him.  Also it would subvert the traditional stereotype that Ultramarines are stuck-up assholes.  
     
    My second choice is a Raven Guard Assault marine, because I like the idea of a giant in power armor sneaking up on people and gutting them with a chainsword...  
  9. Like
    anvil240 got a reaction from Adeptus-B in Ultramarines -- Why No Love?   
    It has been many years since I played a game of 40k, or collected a squad of space marine, but the Ultras have always been my baseline for comparison. When I was playing, I was running my own chapter based on the smurfs because it was allowed. No one would argue about rules if you were just playing "straight" marines painted up in whatever color. Try adding some of the  complications of some of those "Banner" chapters and people would be quite rude (why I don't play 40k anymore). I think it might have been 3rd (?) edition last time I played. When we first started playing Deathwatch, my character was an Ultramarine Tactical cohesion battery (I read that term here yesterday, and know the truth of it now). So I think the scorn comes from the smurfs NOT being "Special snowflakes" like everyone else, might be jealousy that they can get the job done without the mind bending special rules and lists of everyone else, or maybe the plain jane space marine is just too bring for them.
  10. Like
    anvil240 got a reaction from Decessor in Ultramarines -- Why No Love?   
    It has been many years since I played a game of 40k, or collected a squad of space marine, but the Ultras have always been my baseline for comparison. When I was playing, I was running my own chapter based on the smurfs because it was allowed. No one would argue about rules if you were just playing "straight" marines painted up in whatever color. Try adding some of the  complications of some of those "Banner" chapters and people would be quite rude (why I don't play 40k anymore). I think it might have been 3rd (?) edition last time I played. When we first started playing Deathwatch, my character was an Ultramarine Tactical cohesion battery (I read that term here yesterday, and know the truth of it now). So I think the scorn comes from the smurfs NOT being "Special snowflakes" like everyone else, might be jealousy that they can get the job done without the mind bending special rules and lists of everyone else, or maybe the plain jane space marine is just too bring for them.
  11. Like
    anvil240 got a reaction from Lynata in Ultramarines -- Why No Love?   
    It has been many years since I played a game of 40k, or collected a squad of space marine, but the Ultras have always been my baseline for comparison. When I was playing, I was running my own chapter based on the smurfs because it was allowed. No one would argue about rules if you were just playing "straight" marines painted up in whatever color. Try adding some of the  complications of some of those "Banner" chapters and people would be quite rude (why I don't play 40k anymore). I think it might have been 3rd (?) edition last time I played. When we first started playing Deathwatch, my character was an Ultramarine Tactical cohesion battery (I read that term here yesterday, and know the truth of it now). So I think the scorn comes from the smurfs NOT being "Special snowflakes" like everyone else, might be jealousy that they can get the job done without the mind bending special rules and lists of everyone else, or maybe the plain jane space marine is just too bring for them.
  12. Like
    anvil240 reacted to Praetor in Leaning towards chaos   
    I think the best way for a loyal, dedicated marine to turn to Chaos is to start doing the wrong things for all the right reasons.  The Inquisitor giving you bad information?  He must be incompetent, corrupt, or a heretic!  As a loyal servant of the emperor you cannot simply step aside and do nothing.  You find allies among other inquisitors, but they ask you to help them by doing things you wouldn't normally do, but some small sacrifices are required to protect the Imperium.  
     
    Perhaps you discover the rot is wide-spread in the Inquisition, so more drastic measures are required.  Secret ones, because only you recognize the depth of the problem and you would not want your battle-brothers possibly dragged down in disgrace.  Secrecy is required.  This means making distasteful, but expendable, allies.  After all, once the work is done you can kill them all.  It's just that the work never seems to get done.  Perhaps you will kill them tomorrow...
     
    Then when people start to get wind of how far you have gone, the fools don't appreciate the sacrifices you have made, the extent of your vision to save the Imperium.  Regretfully, you have to silence these self-righteous, short-sighted fools.  
     
    The next thing you know, you're performing blood sacrifices to Chaos for hidden knowledge and have been branded as a traitor by all those you were trying to protect, and you realize the Imperium kind of sucks...
  13. Like
    anvil240 reacted to Professor Tanhauser in FNG's stupid questions on skills ' stuff.   
    Ah, thank.you brother, I see now.
  14. Like
    anvil240 got a reaction from Professor Tanhauser in FNG's stupid questions on skills ' stuff.   
    The skill boxes are for basic and trained. Some skills are so simple anyone can do them without training at 1/2 the proscribed stat. If the marine later gets training in that skill he may now use it at the full stat level. Basic skills are listed on pg 93. Everyone gets them. I think the character sheet has boxes for all levels (basic, trained, +10, +20). The skills with only the second box filled in are not basic skills, but advanced skills that require training to use. Any training in skill results in being able to use it at stat level, so skips the basic level completely.
  15. Like
    anvil240 reacted to Calgor Grim in A query on firing vehicle weapons   
    Rites of Battle p166:
    "Any Attack Action a vehicle's gunner or passenger may take are the same as those listed on Table 8-1: Combat Actions."
     
    This section seems to then imply that vehicle weapon rules also follow the same restrictions as foot combat rules which means the usual restrictions in that a player can only make one action with the "Attack" and/or "Concentration" subtype per round. Basically it's no different to if the user was out in the field, they just have several feet of armour extra and possibly a bigger gun. However for the pilot there is one extra clause which states:
     
    "A driver may take an attack action only if he has not used his entire Action to move the vehicle."
     
     
    Look at it from another perspective as well, a round is supposedly lasting around six seconds (give or take). Do you believe it is feasible for someone to be sat on a vehicle mounted weapon, fire off a full burst of ammo with decent enough accuracy to make it look like they are trying, and then quickly jump into another seat to use that gun in the same amount of time? It's probably not realistic to manage it in say six seconds short of a time loop.
     
    This is of course why vehicles with lots of guns need lots of crew to fire them all and/or a decent machine spirit with the appropriate Windows Imperium updates...
  16. Like
    anvil240 got a reaction from SlamDance in Pre-Adventure Timeline: Sophrosyne Research Station 12   
    I like the idea of cutting them off from the hive, I would think that a nerve agent or virus would just be fixed by the next generation of tyrands, kind of like Borg adaptability.
  17. Like
    anvil240 reacted to Lynata in Warhammer 40000: True Story   
    Personally, I'm fine with psychic powers, the Warp and even daemons as they are, as I simply like to see them all as effects of telepathy/telekinesis/etc, with the Warp effectively being a Gestalt consciousness of all the psychic activity in the galaxy.
     
    However, what about this heresy?
     
     
    More than ten thousand years ago, a powerful telepath, whose abilities enabled him to sway the opinions and perception of others, was born onto an Earth ravaged by civil war. By the time he was grown up, he was already an influential man, but his thirst for power had him desire more. With his most trusted followers, he staged a coup and took control over his country of birth. Then, using a mixture of military force and cunning diplomacy, he slowly extended his reach all over the world. Total domination seemed inevitable; his armies seemed to anticipate his enemy's every move, and when meeting with foreign leaders, the latter were miraculously convinced to sign pacts granting him broad powers over soon-to-be united regions.   It was not long until the entire planet was ravaged by wars that sought to bring every last city, every last village under the Emperor's banner. Yet still, his thirst for conquest was not insatiable. Knowing that mankind's ancestors had sent ships to the stars many generations ago, he set his gaze upon the stars, and gathered the brightest scientists of the world -- not only to build him a fleet of ships capable of reaching distant suns, but to build him an army with which to claim them. His lead geneticist, Dr. Outek, finally presented him with the first few specimens of what was to become his Space Marines, post-humans more resembling a living weapon rather than the species which spawned them. In the latter days of the Imperium, it would often be said that Space Marines could only be created from male recruits, but the truth is that the Emperor, being a misogynist, had specifically ordered the necessary treatments to be keyed specifically to the male genome.   Disaster struck when a rebel cell of a movement aiming to free Earth from the tyranny of its dictator infiltrated the main laboratory and - seeing themselves unable to kill what appeared like innocent infants - made away with all twenty clones, still in the process of growing in their sealed containers. Pursued by the Emperor's guards, the group chose to split up, with each of the twenty splinters taking one of the babies. Aided by sympathisers and smugglers, or sometimes outright stealing transportation, they took twenty ships and scattered all over the galaxy. With the laboratory torched, it was hoped that the Emperor's plan to deploy these creatures was at least put on hold if not thwarted entirely.   Unbeknownst to the rebels, the research data was backed up in auxiliary labs all across the planet, enabling a new team to continue Outek's work. Impatient and eager to start his invasion, the Emperor ordered a modification to the Space Marine project: no longer would his warriors be cloned and bred from infancy; now, his geneticists found a way to transform even adolescent boys into terrible warriors. Whilst they were marginally less impressive than the first twenty, these soldiers could be created in a third of the time, significantly speeding up the process of raising the legions.   Finally, the Emperor's fleets set out, and their first target was wayward Mars, which had seceded from one of the old countries of Earth many generations ago. Wracked by its own civil wars, a weird sect of techno-worshipers had arisen there, but for all their arcane trappings, they had much to offer in form of safeguarded technology, much of which had gotten lost during Earth's own apocalyptic wars. Approaching this Cult Mechanicus, the Emperor once again used his telepathic powers to convince them that he was an avatar of their own god. The ruse worked, and though some of the priests proved resilient to this strange relevation of their superiors, any resistance was soon crushed by the combined armies of Earth and Mars.   Now the galaxy's conquest began in earnest, and terran warships upgraded with martian engines and weaponry set out to cross the distance between suns. Countless colonies fell before the might of the Emperor's Space Marines, who ruthlessly swept across lost colonies and brought them under Terra's banner by fire and sword. Taking many new worlds by storm, it did not take long until the Emperor's fleets caught up with those who had stolen his twenty clones, who had grown up to their adult forms by now.   The first to be recovered was a young man known as Horus. Lovingly raised by the rebels who stole him, he knew of Earth's history and the threat posed by the Emperor. The confrontation was narrowly averted, however, as the Emperor talked him down. Horus could not know, the Emperor argued, what truly happened on Earth, about the global devastation and how he had only wanted to make peace. It certainly helped that the Emperor had long since become a megalomaniac and begun to believe in his own lies, seeing himself as a savior of humankind. By subtly reaching out and touching Horus' mind with his psychic powers, the Emperor had soon convinced the clone to lay down his arms and surrender. Not long after, Horus would become his first general, leading the Emperor's Space Marines onto galactic conquest, all for the grand vision of a unified humanity.   The Emperor's lies would come back to haunt him during the last phase of his great crusade, however. On the world of Davin, Horus came into contact with a warrior cult that practiced deep meditation inspired by ancient asian martial arts. Honouring local culture, Horus agreed to participate in a night-long ceremony and was led into a trance. But not only did Horus gain a deeper understanding of his own self, as was the goal of the exercise -- when touching his subconscious, Horus discovered traces of the Emperor's manipulation, and how he had apparently influenced him earlier. Deeply unsettled, Horus departed Davin and began his own research into Terra's past. Discovering the truth about the Emperor's ambitions, including various massacres and total disregard for human life, the warlord began to plot against his master, and the seeds of what later generations would remember as the Horus Heresy were sown.   Now it has been ten thousand years since the Emperor was struck down by his own general. Ten thousand years since the rebellion saw Space Marines fight against Space Marines, with the losers being driven into exile. Terribly warped and mutated by the psychic energies at work in their hideout, they have long since ceased to resemble the noble insurgents they once were. In brutal irony, their new forms are a direct result of how Imperial propaganda indoctrinates countless billions of human citizens, and thousands of years of describing Horus' legions as horned monsters have birthed one of mankind's most terrible foes.   As for the Emperor himself, his ambitions were ended by Horus' own hands, and he died on the steps of the throne from which he intended to rule the stars. To replace his psychic guidance of the Imperium's fleets, his council - a coven of the realm's highest lords - convened and ultimately ordered the tech-priests to construct a replacement. It was found that just by draining a thousand psychic humans a day, it would be possible to recreate the fabled beacon the Emperor was able to project for his ships' navigators. The "harvest" was brutally enforced, and publicly backed up as being the Emperor's own command. To preserve their power, the lords made use of a burgeoning trend among the less advanced colonies: deification. With his bombastic speeches, his egocentric vanity and the dominating charisma he used to employ, it was not difficult to spread the idea of godhood, in particular as Mars already revered him as a divine entity due to his own ploy. Thus, mankind entered the Age of the God-Emperor -- a dessicated corpse as the figurehead of an unloving, bloodthirsty regime where torture and murder have become an everyday occurrence feeding and tainting the psychic substance of the Immaterium in a spiral of violence that threatens to devour an entire galaxy.
  18. Like
    anvil240 reacted to musungu in Deathwatch Marines - how old?   
    Well, Squats were killed off in-universe, not "they never existed" retconned (and there are still some of them alive IIRC, who weren't at home when the 'nids came), so it's not surprising they show up on lists. The rumour the GW's death squad comes for you when you mention them is quite unfou
  19. Like
    anvil240 reacted to Magnus Grendel in Deathwatch Campaign   
    "....No Plan Enemy Survives Contact With The Enemy Plan"
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