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Parkrrrr2

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  1. Musha Shukou said: I have a few boxes from Hobby Lobby to store all my materials, and they store them very well. I started off with this box to hold all my materials, but I didn't like how the cards fit in it, so now I use it to store all my game boards, rulebooks, monster bag with all the monster tokens in it, all the sheets (AO, investigator, herald, guardian, institution), investigator tokens, all my dice, and all replaced items (I'm looking at you CotDP). I have that same box. Mine holds everything: http://boardgamegeek.com/image/1467518/parkrrrr I really need to take more pictures of that.
  2. I've seen it mentioned on BGG, but not in this thread: Hobby Lobby sells a fairly sturdy wooden "artist box" that just fits the base game and all 8 expansions if you're careful. See http://boardgamegeek.com/image/1467518/parkrrrr for a not-very-good picture of my own implementation. After this picture was taken, I replaced the wooden crossbar that holds the boards in the top with an aluminum one that's much thinner. Eventually, I'll replace it with steel as aluminum isn't terribly thematic. I also made a custom monster bag, visible in the picture linked below, that holds the dice and fits beside the board in the lid of the case. The AO sheets are beneath the right-hand stack of Investigator sheets in this picture; I've since discovered that I can fit three stacks horizontally so they don't need to be mixed together anymore. I eventually intend to put all of those and the herald/guardian/institution/limit sheets into appropriately-sized envelopes so they're both better-organized and somewhat more thematic. You can see some of the custom card boxes I made to the right of the Investigator sheets. The boxes are cut from chipboard, folded, and taped with bookbinding tape. With one exception, each box has a custom-made label that identifies the contents (usually somewhat obliquely.) Most of the visible labels should be self-explanatory. The large "miscellaneous grab bag" box contains individually banded decks that were too small to merit their own individual boxes - Allies, Injuries, Dust, Blessings of Nodens, that sort of thing. The box labeled "Tickets" contains all of the cards of which there are 8 each - Retainers, Rail Passes, Sheldon Gang Memberships, and so on. Beneath the Investigator sheets (not visible in this picture) are four boxes of Arkham Encounter cards, one for each expansion and the base game. Within each of those boxes, each neighborhood deck fits in a custom-made slipcase designed to allow easy removal and replacement of the entire deck. You can see those boxes opened and in use in the rear right corner of this image: http://boardgamegeek.com/image/1466937/parkrrrr. The slipcase for Rivertown can be seen just behind the monster bag on the right side of the table. There's also a box of other-world encounters, a box of Mythos cards, and another "miscellaneous grab bag" box, again containing individually-banded decks that are too small to merit their own boxes. Finally, the back of the box, beneath the heralds and so on, contains four more cardboard boxes. One box holds four rows of vertical monster tokens (one row of which consists of spawn monsters and Mask monsters, along with a cardboard spacer to keep them upright.) Another box holds four stacks of Investigator tokens (it should be six stacks; I need to remake the paper insert for this box.) A third box contains the gate tokens. And the final box, the largest of all, contains small plastic boxes that hold the various small tokens. (You can see these in the second image, too, spread out all over the table.This makes it really easy for one player to, for example, set up the board while another counts out the tokens for the investigators.) The Dunwich Horror lives in one of these boxes, too, along with his markers (when we play, those don't come out very often) and the orange "doom die" we use to roll on rumor cards and green-bordered monsters and whatnot. (One of our number professes to believe in "training" dice to roll correctly, so this die always sits on the usually-safe '3' when it's not being rolled.) If anyone wants to make their own version, I have a spreadsheet that lists the sizes of all of the cardboard boxes, as well as Inkscape drawings for the neighborhood slipcases (I didn't save pages for the individual neighborhoods; all I have is the outline of two sizes of generic slipcase - one that holds 39 cards for Arkham neighborhoods and one that holds 34 for expansion neighborhoods. Yes, they really are different sizes, and it really does matter.)
  3. eiterorm said: it could well be an advantage to have a Nightgaunt on the board. In my opinon, monsters should be a disadvantage rather than an advantage. To explain away the "monsters should be a disadvantage" thing, the FAQ says (and has said, since the previous version) "Thematically, as servants of Nodens, Nightgaunts sometimes helped investigators." Granted, it's answering a different question, and the probability is much lower for that FAQ answer to be applicable, but the idea is there.
  4. It may be unlikely, but it happened to us again this past weekend. And we don't even use clue tokens to mark Rumor cards like you're supposed to; I have some generic counters for that. We used Brood tokens for the overage, and got them out of play again as quickly as we could. Part of the problem this time was that we were playing with Hypnos, who was putting out one or two clue tokens each upkeep phase. We also had a couple investigators who were hoarding clue tokens but were too busy fighting monsters to do anything about gates - we'd gotten whichever Mythos card it is that dumps monsters all over Innsmouth, and three of those were fast monsters. And, of course, Innsmouth was under Martial Law. Fortunately, we were playing with Wendy Adams, who passes all evade checks in street areas, so we sent her to just stand on the bus station until someone with some weapons could get there. But that meant that all the clue tokens she was hanging on to were tied up for several turns. (This turned out better than we could have hoped, though: three of the monsters were square monsters, and someone closed a square gate. Finally, one of the other investigators finished off the two remaining proto-shoggoths who were sniffing around the bus station looking for Wendy and wishing they'd finished the shoggoth training.)
  5. Embery said: If he looses 6 stamina in a fight with a monster, he is immidiatly sended to Hospital and regains 1 stamina (Or all if he has money). Am I Right? I'm Right! If he looses 4 sanity in a horror check, he is immidiatly sended to Asylum and regains 1 sanity (or all of he has money).Am I Right? I'm Right! This doesn't seem strictly correct. Specifically, the "or all if he has money" parts aren't right. Here's what the rulebook says: If an investigator is ever reduced to 0 Stamina while in Arkham, the investigator is knocked unconscious. He must immediately choose and discard half of his items and half of his Clue tokens (rounded down), along with all retainers (if any). The player then immediately moves his investigator to St. Mary’s Hospital. The investigator is restored to 1 Stamina and has no further encounters this turn. The investigator may take his next turn as normal. Since the "pay $2 to regain max stamina" effect at St. Mary's Hospital is an encounter, it does not happen immediately. The soonest it can happen is on the investigator's next turn.
  6. I have Lurker. I have them all, though my CotDP isn't ®. But you make a good point: who needs pennies when I have power tokens? Unless the Lurker actually is the herald, I suppose, but then I can use Yellow Sign tokens or Brood tokens.
  7. jgt7771 said: Buy the Core game of the Call of Cthulhu LCG Can't do that. I'm a pathological completist, to the extent that I paid way, WAY too much money for StarCraft: Typhon, If I ever got started with an LCG, I'd disappear down a black hole. Besides, pennies are cheaper.
  8. A couple weeks ago, we were playing a game where we ran out of clue tokens. I think this is the second time it's happened, and we basically just shrugged it off and went on, but now I'm wondering what the official ruling is, if there is an official ruling: are you limited to the number of clue tokens in the box, or are clues considered infinite? The specific circumstances that allowed this to happen were that we had had the "No One Can Help You Now" environment, which doesn't allow gates to be sealed, for several turns so we were all hoarding clue tokens while we waited for another environment to come up. Meanwhile, nothing had been happening in Dunwich or Innsmouth so most of the unstable locations there still had their original clue tokens. Then, Akachi achieved her personal story, which told us to put clue tokens on all of the unstable locations without gates (which was most of them; we were closing gates, even if we couldn't seal them.) By that point, we only had a handful of clue tokens in the supply, so we distributed them to the unstable locations we were most likely to visit in the next few turns, but it did leave us wondering what we should have done.
  9. We usually play three players with two investigators each, for six investigators total. But there's very little choice involved: we draw exactly six random investigators from the monster bag, then give two to each player (with some leeway when a particular player's favorite investigators come up; for example, if Lily Chen comes up she'll likely be played by Dave.) While one of us is choosing and setting up the investigators, the other one is choosing a completely random AO, Herald, Guardian, and Institution by rolling dice. For the AO, for example, he deals the AO sheets into six stacks and rolls a d6 to choose a stack, then rolls another d6 to choose which of those four we'll use, rerolling it on a 5 or 6. Admittedly, though, we have been known to veto certain AOs if it's already late at night and we weren't particularly wanting a tough fight.
  10. I'm going to disagree with everyone else on (a) and say that the way I read it, you need either 8 or 10 successes in a 4-player game. While Yibb's card does explicitly say that she doubles the number of successes you need, I read that as saying that each hit is half as effective. I see Joey as sort of a virtual investigator who exists solely for purposes of determining the AO's total hit points. That being the case, I say you should apply Joey's effect first, then Yibb's. I say "either 8 or 10" because Yibb's card does say "usual number." You could argue that Joey is unusual, so Yibb's power ignores him entirely. But if I were playing it, I'd go with 10.
  11. jgt7771 said: All these decks, even with every card from every expansion, are easily manageable, even though they're larger. (Frankly, it's easier to grab one of these decks than a puny 14-20 card lone neighborhood.) It saves TONS of space on any table, and I bet it would save a pile of wood to make only 6 compartments instead of 15. I use three 8-up business card racks to hold my encounter decks. All 19 encounter decks plus all of the small Investigator decks (I can fit three small decks in a single slot of the rack with some overlap) take up the space of about 9 decks laid flat on the table. I regularly fit all of my decks on a single TV tray this way. (Actually, that's not quite true: I put the Act cards, the Innsmouth Look deck, and the Dunwich Horror decks on the board in reasonable locations, though I could probably just leave the DH deck in the box for as little as it gets used.) Also, a single neighborhood is either 34 (DH, KH, IH) or 39 (AH) cards if you're using all the expansions. A 117-card deck would start to get a bit unwieldy, especially since you need to shuffle it every time it's used.
  12. schmoo34 said: Why not this? http://www.ebay.com/itm/Wood-Box-to-Hold-Your-Arkham-Horror-Game-and-ALL-Expansions-/261075627182?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3cc951ecae That says it holds all the expansions, but (among other things) the "medium container to hold location decks" seems to have space for only 15 decks. Last I counted, there were 19 location decks. Maybe it works, somehow, but I certainly wouldn't drop $162 (with shipping) on it based on those pictures.
  13. Julia said: parkrrrr said: The rules don't just suggest it; they outright state "half, rounded down." Is this some sort of new math? As said, Tibs said this is to be changed in the FAQ to avoid people exploiting the "I have only one item, let's try to kill that dam(n) Star Spawn" I'm convinced that the FAQ is an elaborate practical joke. I mean, I've been convinced of that for a long time, what with the continuing insistence that it'll be published someday in the face of years of evidence to the contrary, but now I'm even more convinced. This is the sort of thing that goes in an erratum, not in a FAQ. FAQs are for rules clarifications, not changes to existing, well-specified rules.
  14. The rules don't just suggest it; they outright state "half, rounded down." Is this some sort of new math?
  15. thevampyresade said: Julia said: Acutally, I think the deputy revolver is consider an item when you count the number of item you have in order to lose half of them. However, you can chose not to lose it. Espcially if it's your last item. That's not unique to the deputy's revolver, though. You always choose which items you lose, and if you only have one item you lose none.
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