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Nazz04355

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About Nazz04355

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  1. I realize that this is an old topic but I just bought the game with both expansions mixed together. Unfortunately now I'm trying to separate everything and I'm not able to figure out which hut and village tokens came in the base vs. expansions. Does anyone happen to know what came in what box? Thanks!
  2. Thank you very much for the list Ricedwlit!
  3. I'm trying to separate out my MoM expansion from the base game. I know that there are 6 gates and 14/8 Monster/Epic Monster tokens in the MoM expansion but I can't find a list of which ones they actually are. Does anyone here have a list of which gates/monster tokens came with MoM? Thanks!
  4. There is always an Edge Battle phase in an engagement. In addition, playing cards into the Edge Battle is voluntary. From page 19 of the rulebook under "Resolving The Edge Battle" "At the start of the edge battle, the attacking player has the first option of placing one card facedown from his hand in front of him, forming his edge stack. He may instead choose to pass. (emphasis mine) The defending player may then place one card facedown from his hand in front of him (if he controls at least one defending unit), forming his edge stack. He may instead choose to pass. (emphasis mine) In this way, players alternate, each placing one card facedown into his edge stack or passing, until both players consecutively pass." So if both players cannot (or chose not) to put cards in the Edge Battle the Edge Battle is still resolved. If neither side has any force icons in their Edge Battle stack that would be considered a tie. Ties in the Edge Battle are always won by the defender. At least that's the way I view it…
  5. Saramund said: What happens if the last to remain is '5'? Is the next to cover number 6 or 4? What do you think? Page 16 of the rulebook (Under the Action Tracks sections) states "When Sauron takes an action, he places an action token on the leftmost empty space of its Action Track and resolves the action" So in this case the next covered number would be 6 since its the leftmost empty space.
  6. Holy Outlaw said: JerusalemJones said: That seems counter-productive to me. You will still need the same number of crisis cards to get the jump tracks, and while in the brig your ability to throw on checks is diminished. How can this strategy actually benefit you? Very rarely productive, I agree. I've played the game a lot and can't remember a time when I thought it'd be good for the fleet to brig a human. But speaking purely in the abstract, while having a player in the brig does not reduce the number of crisis cards drawn during a game, it does favorably alter the ratio of cards drawn vs. skill checks made. CARDS DRAWN vs. POTENTIAL SKILL CHECKS IN ONE TURN (one full circling of the table): 5 humans, none in brig: 25 cards drawn, 5 skill checks (max) 5 humans, one in brig: 25 cards drawn, 4 skill checks (max) If you employ this strategy, over the course of the game, there will be more turns, more human actions, more cards drawn by the human fleet, but the same number of crises. Incidentally, it's worth pointing out that the presence of cylons at the table really turns the math against this strategy, while the absence of cylons makes it largely unnecessary, since five humans rarely run into the kind of card shortage that would justify such desperate measures. After all, when the cylons do finally show up at sleeper and human actions and cards are really at a premium, the fleet will usually regret having that human in the hole ... We seem to always run into the situation where we have a run of high strength crisis cards in a row. Most players are usually hovering around 1-2 skill cards in their hand by time it comes back to their turn to draw. Having a character in the brig gives them 1 one less crisis card to have to vote on plus it allows the character in the brig to draw to their full hand size in about 2 turns. I'm not saying that this is a long term strategy but it certainly has allowed us to slow the resource depletion rate that happens by failing skill checks.
  7. JerusalemJones said: Nazz04355 said: myrm said: 2) No, if you look at the brig space it specifies that you do not draw a crisis card while in the brig And this can actually be beneficial if you're starting to run low on resources. We've had players purposefully get thrown into the brig to slow down how many crisis cards we went through. That seems counter-productive to me. You will still need the same number of crisis cards to get the jump tracks, and while in the brig your ability to throw on checks is diminished. How can this strategy actually benefit you? It's beneficial as a delaying tactic. Yes you still need the same number of crisis cards to jump, but it gives you time to collect skill cards up to your maximum hand size. Even by reducing the crisis card count by one per round of play (round being everyone at the table gets a turn) you're allowing the players to hold onto more skill cards that they can use for the tougher crisis votes.
  8. myrm said: 2) No, if you look at the brig space it specifies that you do not draw a crisis card while in the brig And this can actually be beneficial if you're starting to run low on resources. We've had players purposefully get thrown into the brig to slow down how many crisis cards we went through.
  9. Holy Outlaw said: To me, it's not even close, and I'm not speaking out of nostalgia for the TV showseveral players in the group were unfamiliar with BSG prior to playing the game. This board game does such a fine job of combining the best elements of cooperative games like "Arkham Horror" and "Pandemic" with incomplete information games like "Werewolf," with appropriate strategic and thematic elements. I have to agree with His Holiness here. The first time I played Battlestar Galactica I had never seen the show. But that had absolutely no affect on my enjoyment of the game. In fact, I probably enjoyed it more because of it. It allowed me to spend more time focusing on the game than noticing any inconsistencies between game and show. It was only after playing the game a few times that I borrowed Season 1 from a friend and watched it. The game mechanics are wonderful. I'm a huge fan of semi-cooperative games such as BSG and Shadows Over Camelot. And I love that you never know if a player is a traitor or isn't. That has led to some games where the accusations were flying high and hard (in a friendly manner of course) and those were some of the most enjoyable game sessions we had. FFG posts all their rulebooks online so my suggestion is to read through the rules and see if the game matches the type of games that your group likes to play. If so, it's definitely worth the pick-up.
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