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Woodclaw

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  1. I've tried something like this myself, adding a good measure of Cyberpunk 2020 to level some problems with the combat section. Unfortunalty the work went to the backburner some time ago, due to time constraints.
  2. bogi_khaosa said: I really want an answer to this question myself. Long lases I believe cannot be silenced/muzzle-flashed (?), so if you use one enemies will always know where you are. So they are not really a sniper rifle so much as a "take down big things" rifle. Actually in Hostile Acquisition for Rogue Trader there was a weapon mod called Whisper-Bolt Discharger that did exactly that. Pretty much it shifted the las-bolt dischange from visible light to infrared, making the beam almost invisible but a also a bit weaker.
  3. Plushy said: I'll admit to not touching this in several months! School started back up and it's stolen all of my free time. That said, I have been fiddling with idea of reworking Deathwatch in a similar fashion. I'm also aware that my Arbitrator/Enforcer career here isn't up to par, and I've tinkered with a little bit of Ascension stuff. Solid requests woul certainly spur me on! I hope your group finds it to work well. Any feedback you can give would be wonderful! Sorry for the thread necromancy, but I'm about to start a game using your work, Plushy. So I might be able to provide some insight soon.
  4. I was working on the same concept a while ago. Lack of Supplies (1-2): your regiment is very low on supplies, for 1 point halve all the avaible consumable (ammunitions, food, water , fuel), for 2 point apply the above effect and also reduce the starting kit points by 5. Regimental Feud (1): your regiment have an ongoing feud with another unit operating in the same war theatre, gain the Enemy (one IG regiment) talent. Reputation (1): the regiment have a reputation for something like, lack of discipline, lazyness or scavenging, as arule of thumb the commisariat are hot on their tail everything something go awry. Gain the Enemy (Commisariat) talent.
  5. I think that close Combat doesn't work well too, the mchanics doesn't fit the description at all. Maybe something like this will be better. Close Combat: this weapon is project to be easier to wield in confined spaces, you can consider it a Pistol instead of a Basic weapon for the purpose of calculating the penalties from confinement. I know that thsi version might be pretty powerful, but I couldn't think of anything else at the moment.
  6. Mercucio said: 3. Frontier Worlds: You are assuming there is no reason to raise a regiment. When Orcs invade, regiments get made =P. As for the stats I hewed as close to the source material as possible. I think that there is no reason for a frontier world not to raise regiments. Valhalla can be considered a frontier sector in many ways, due to its proximity to Ork space. Same with Tanith, by the description Tanith was a world on the edge of the human domination, dangerously close to Chaos space and slightly backwater by Imperial standards. Mercucio said: 4. Raising Troops from Space Stations: It would certainly be possible to raise a unit of void-born (see DH) in theory, but are there an facilities with populations large enough a raise a regiment from? Well in the Kornus expanse there is the Port Wander station, which look large enough to raise at least one regiment. Granted, these kind of structures should be quite rare and consequantly very few regiments should be raised from them.
  7. JuankiMan said: WittyDroog said: And so what if the whole group has fancy camo armor? They have to be stationary to use it properly which, as I've said before, is a gamble in many of the games I've played in. It'll serve you no good against melee targets that engage you, or indiscriminate artillery and blast weapons, and a skilled shooter can still hit you despite the penalties if properly trained and equipped. All the option does is change how the regiment fights (opting for a stealthy and stationary approach) and how the GM will deal with it. Its hardly a game breaker, just means some tactics will be harder. As I already mentioned, it is true that it isn't that great against melee foes, but the problem is that only a skilled shooter with superior training and equipment has any kind of chance to hit them. Enemy guardsmen? Useless. Ork shootas? Their accuracy was atrocius before, now their chance to hit is zero. Tau fire warriors? Even making standard attacks they are as accurate as orks. And it goes the other way too. If the squad faces a foe wearing camaleonine, their only tactical option is to try and rush into melee (and it has to be melee, camaleonine inflicts -30 to hit even at point-blank), hoping that they can deflect enemy bullets with the bullets already lodged in their face. The players usually won't have indiscriminate artillery on hand and blast weapons are bound to miss and scatter harmlessly. I think camaleonine is indeed a game breaker because it kills any challenge a firefight might have for the side that has it, and punctuating every firefight with an artillery bombardment that forces the players to move their butt will stop being serious quite quickly. Also the players will start to wonder if every single ranged enemy suddenly sports a telescopic sight or has the Marksman talent, the only two reliable ranged counters I can think of. Maybe I'm thinking too much in terms of real world and not enough in game terms, but I think that there is one easy way out of this pond: Frag grenades. When a character lobs a frag he doesn't need to aim it at the target, but just to a spot next to it. So if the squad has a general idea of where their camalaoline-wearing opponents are they can lob a few frags over and see what happens. Since they can target terrain features in the area the bonus from camaleoline doesn't apply. Also if the opponents dodge they will lose the camaleoline, if they stay still they will be showered with metal fragments all over.
  8. Plushy said: Earth-caste Technician: Not sure how to handle this guy. Any tips? I think that the Techpriest can be a good term of comparison. Granted the Earth-caste is likely to be less belligerant and more geared toward controlling drones, but I think that there should be a reasonable degree of similarity. Plushy said: The Nicassar could be our psyker with some Navigate abilities, but fluff seems to oppose that. A shame; there's art of them as squidheads, and I adore that. Vespid need to be Strain Leaders, which kinda sucks. Probably not building them yet. Question on Kroot Shapers; are they Psykers? Could that justify being a separate Spec? Tarellians are my favorite xenos in all of 40k. Ideas for them? I can't speak about the other xenos, but the shapers aren't psykers, at least not in the general sense of the word. As far as I know (which isn't very far) their ability to select DNA strands comes from the Kroot unique biology, not from a psychic power. From what I recall their ability is similar to the Astartes ability to extract informations by eating an enemy's flesh.
  9. Plushy said: With the addition of Variable Settings for lasweapons, I find myself worried about the effectiveness of Bolt weapons. Let's look at the overcharged M36 Lasgun: 1d10+5 Pen 2, single shot, 15 rounds before a reload, with Unreliable. Compare to the Boltgun: 1d10+5 Pen 4, S/3/-, 24 rounds, with Tearing. The default weapon of the Guard is now capable of being very close to the Boltgun… which is four steps rarer and supposed to be a devastating weapon. Considering that similar settings on the Triplex can give Proven 5 and Felling 4 (at only one rarity level lower than the Boltgun) I'm starting to feel like it just isn't that intimidating anymore. Some kind of damage boost, upped Pen, or maybe giving it a Felling or Proven score sounds more appropriate for these relics. Does anyone agree with me or am I over-reacting? Well, the boltgun still edges the overcharge lasgun by a little thanks to Tearing and Semi-Auto (not to mention eventual special ammo), but I see your point. The big problem is that making the boltgun as intimidating as some of the fiction implies would require a major step up for Plasma and Melta weapons, which will require a rebalancing of the entire weapon/armor ratio. Still the current boltgun feel a little underwhelmed by the new M36. Felling might be a good way to fix that, considering that the Bolter technology is pretty much meant to kill creatures with Unnatural Toughness (some BG text from GW implied that the first prototypes of boltguns were developed after humanity encountered the Orks during the Dark Age of Technology).
  10. Morangias said: What is it with people thinking Commissars should have Intimidate? Terrifying your troops into obedience is a special action from Command, not Intimidate. It's practically the only time when the Commissar is supposed to be scary - abusing intimidation isn't any good for morale in the long run. I agree with this idea. In my mind a commisar use a combination of several skills, his main objective is to motivate troops and punish. Depending on the unit a commisar might have to use intimidation, front-line leadership or maybe even bluffing. Being a trigger-happy psycho isn't good enough for the commisariate, and such commisar won't probably survive very long. A bolt pistol to the face is a great tool for intimidation, as long as the running man isn't aiming a meltagun to your guts. Going by the official version of the IG Uplifting Primer every regiment should have 90% of losses due to the work of the commisariate, since 9/10 of the offenses listed are punished with summary execution. Clearly this is not a viable line of work.
  11. Kasatka said: Well to be honest i don't think rolling 100 even needs to mean it is empty: it could have jammed or siezed up or had some other issue with it that is beyond the scope of combat to fix. As such you count as Jammed and cannot clear it (except maybe with the use of Technical Knock as a Full Action) for the rest of the scene. This is precisely the situation backup weapons are for! Maybe one can rule that on a roll of 100 the condensator in the packs overhats and they need some rounds (1d5 perhaps) to cool down before one can resume firing.
  12. Kiton said: The Backpack itself is too heavy, and from there the numbers go all wrong. Its one thing if it was slightly less efficient, but Lascannons are pretty much the only weapon where that backpack is advantageous. The entire point of it is the efficiency of bulk purchases either in ammunition carried, and/or action economy. You HAVE to make up for most of the weight with ammunition, without forgetting [or giving nearly as much weight to as its been so far] the improvements caused by not having to reload for far longer. Hellpistol/gun Capacitor: 80 shots, 5kg Heavy Capacitor: 250 shots, 15kg -Here, its a bit less efficient, but you're going 80 hell weapon shots without reloads, whereas using clips at quarter capacity would require reloading seven times for 4kg. The capacitors are too large to just plug into the gun, but they're not a rucksack. The small ones are about canteen-sized, usually affixed horizontally to the lower back, while the larger capacitors are an obvious thing, as well as a significant amount of weight. -Some may carry a second small capacitor on occasion, but multiple heavy capacitors are rarely assigned to a trooper under most circumstances. From here, an actual backpack rule for other weapons Backpacks function for any clip or magazine-based weapon not stated as being fed externally in the first place. While smaller models only reduce loading times, the basic carrying frame is standardized, and efficiency improves with larger units: Small: 5kg. Carries the equivalent of four times the normal clip capacity of a weapon. Standard: 10kg: Holds ten times the weapon's normal ammunition capacity. Heavy: 20kg: Holds 20 times the weapon's normal ammunition capacity in seperate packs, chambers or cells: These packs are generally used as a squad's supply rather than personal unit, and allow rapid distribution: While capable of discharging all available ammunition through the wearer's weapon, Standard clips or magazines may be replenished from the pack's capacity using a number of actions equal to the normal reload time of the weapon [rapid reload may apply]. While they are not perfect I like these rules a lot more than the official ones, great job.
  13. Just to addd a couple of observation on this issue. Based on precedent games a standard Lasgun connected to a Ammo Backpack has 200 shot, which are equivalent to 3 and half clips. Now I know that the 40k is all about grimdark and stuff, but no soldier right of his mind will ever replace 1.5 Kg of clips with 25 Kg of backpack. The whole Hellgun issue is even worst.
  14. Pappystein said: Ravenstormchaser said: So yeah something needs to be changed with either the weights or the lifting weight table… Actually I would say all three ?. 1) The Masses of some items we are expected to carry in combat are crazy. Missile launcher for 35kg (that is over 80lbs people,) Gravchute for 15kg (35lbs anyone.) HOWEVER I think many other items are too light. Eg Ammunition. 2)The Carry/Lift/Push chart is quite off in how the human body works. I would say only the LIFT/Push portions are close to accurate based upon a STR/Tough bonus system currently used. You can safely carry without being encumbered more than it is showing on the chart vs your LIFT mass (this assumes a person in reasonable good health like say, an Imperial Guard soldier.) However there is a simple solution to this. A Level 1 Talent can be added to the game called “Imperial Guard Trained” This grants you a +2 to your STR/Toughness bonus sum for the purpose of Carry load only. ALL existing Imperial Guard Specialties should have this granted. It should not be automatic during Character creation to allow for non-Imperial Guard characters to be made by the GM using the same basic structure. Likewise Clothing and Armor should not count their full weight to encumbrance. Higher grade items (Flack Armor, Carapace Armor and the like) should count maybe half their mass to encumbrance, whilst lower grade armor (Chain mail) should count 2/3rds their mass. 3) The Entirety of the Armory should be audited and special care should be taken to separate Imperial Guard weapons from those of Space Marines. And then it needs to be remembered that 1 kilogram weighs 2.205 pounds! Pappystein Agreed. I got the feeling that some of the weights were estimated on a very weird scale (the proposed weight of an Astartes in DW is completely over the top). Going by the above example of the Missile Laucher a rela world Stinger Launcher weights around 15 Kg and can hit a target up to 4.8 Km, while a SMAW weight around 8 Kg. Same with many other weapons whose weight is quite incosistent with the description. About armor I disagree with making it weight less, the biggest problem with armor isn't the weight per se, but the fatigue. Armors aren't the best option in terms of transpiration and increment the fatigue. Even modern day armors are pretty bad, a 10 Kg Interceptor body armor weights fully on the shoulder, but it means running with a 10Kg backpack. The idea of an IG Training talent/trait as coutermeasure for the weight problem is an interesting solution, which might actually work pretty well. Otherwise the introduction of hihg level combat webbings reducing the burder (like the US Marines MOLLE vest) can be implemented.
  15. JuankiMan said: If you're worried about weight, remember that you're not forced to carry ALL of your regimental kit with you. Actually, doing so might be quite unreasonable, depending what it consists in (taking your dress uniform to battle seems a tad bit weird). Also, grav-chutes weigh 15kg, but you're not expected to lug it around for extended periods of time, just as paratroopers aren't expected to re-fold and retrieve their parachutes. I always assumed rations weighed 2kg/day because they included water, which makes the weight much more reasonable. JuankiMan said: If you're worried about weight, remember that you're not forced to carry ALL of your regimental kit with you. Actually, doing so might be quite unreasonable, depending what it consists in (taking your dress uniform to battle seems a tad bit weird). Also, grav-chutes weigh 15kg, but you're not expected to lug it around for extended periods of time, just as paratroopers aren't expected to re-fold and retrieve their parachutes. I always assumed rations weighed 2kg/day because they included water, which makes the weight much more reasonable. Not to be a shameless nitpicker (which I often am) but I think that you're mising a couple of points. The entire concept behind a military standard kit is to make it as portable as possible, certainly some items aren't meant to be in the kitbag all the time, but the bulk of it will be. Just for the sake of argument a present day kit usually include: Body Armor (at least 7 Kg, possibly more with insert plates) A long weapon (assault rifle 3 to 4 Kg) Clips of ammo (at least 6-7, 0.5 Kg each) A Close combat weapon (0.5 Kg) A Sidearm (0.8 Kg) Clips for the sidearm (2-3, 0.1 Kg each) Grenades (3 to 6, 0.4 Kg each) Backpack Mess kit Bedroll Rations excluding water (at least 0.3 Kg each meal) Just for the record during the operations in Afghanistan the standard infantry loadout for a 3 days recon mission was 150 pounds per soldier, which means around 65-67 Kg. Also a 2Kg ration surely doesn't include water. Water weights 1Kg per liter, a fully grown man drinks 2 to 4 liters a day depending on the outside temperature and climate. So a one day ration including water will weight at least 3 Kg. For this reason real world rations include (or included) tablets to purify water on the field.
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