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Basic advice you can't find in the books.


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#1 Jolinar

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 03:42 PM

I have dabbled in dark heresy and got the rogue trader handbook. And I thought I knew the system until I actually played the included mission in dark heresy… turns out I didn't know the important things. (how to balance out fire fights, the importance of grenades, pinning, pysker powers etc)

The topic title says it all, basically what I would like is advice on the games, advice you can't find in the books, things you only know about after running games for some time. Some things that might actually go against what the book says but works better. Or a simple five year old explanation of complex yet important rule. Any advice will do. 1d4chan's advice was for dark herasy as follows.

1. when in doubt, use grenades

2. Give players with low BS (adepts) something with high rate of fire, and let him do pinning to make them feel apart of the combat

3. Give player with high BS somethign that fires single, high powered rounds. 

4. its okay to push them hard as long as they know they are going to be hit hard. 

5. always be prepared for characters losing appendages.

6. Always always always be prepared for perils of the warp (which might cause rule #5 to come into effect.)

 

Is there any advice like this for Rogue trader? It would really help. 



#2 puenboy

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 04:48 PM

7.) Don't triple-post a thread in the Rogue Trader forums



#3 weaver95

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 06:14 PM

8. friendly fire isn't.

9. orbital lance strikes have the right of way.

10. don't pet the genestealers.

11. be friendly to everyone you meet…but keep a macrocannon battery primed and loaded just in case.

12. don't get shot with your own guns.

13. never trust an Inquisitor.

14. oil the tech priest from time to time.

15. don't bring the daemonette home to meet the family.

16. always pack a heavy flamer.  they have so many uses!



#4 SirFrog

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Posted 19 March 2013 - 09:57 PM

17. Remember to bring at least one missile launcher with krak missiles

18. Shoot the psyker first

19. Eldars are annoying, treacherous bastards.

20. Daemon = bad things. Always.

21. Keep at least one dude with Psyniscience around all the time, you can find out so much with that.

22. Selentine Pattern Void-suits are your friend.

23. Las weaponry is the AK-47 of 40k.

24. Keep a medkit and someone trained in medicine around.

25. Preysense will make the GM rage, assuming (s)he plays it like regular thermal.



#5 eBarbarossa

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 01:27 AM

Quite good, except that 2 and 3 should be "advise the player". They are incredi-rich individuals that can buy themselves whatever the hell they want. :-)

Also:

Rak'Gol are damn scary; use with caution.

Mind Probe can be a pain for the GM.

Make you game a sand box, not a railroad.

Space combat is a game within the game. Make sure to learn it.

It's okay for the player characters to be over-equipped. They have enough money to bury a hive fleet in.

 

Hope that helps!

 



#6 Kasatka

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 04:47 AM

  • Always pre-plan which characters get posted to which role on a ship when designing it - there's no point making a ship with a fancy sub-system if you aren't going to have a dedicated player character to benefit from it and lend their strong skill set to it (such as a medicae deck without someone trained in medicae and in the ships Chief Chirurgeon role)

 

  • Dual-wielding may be more Xp intensive than simply taking a big gun but makes you so much more versatile that it is worth it. Also its very shawsbuckling to wield swords and pistols in combination.

 

  • Diplomacy should be your first choice in any situation - your ship may be potent but you are but a single (or potentially small group of) ship(s) in a vast area full of hostile vessels.

 

  • Just because the Rogue Trader is the in-character leader it doesn't mean other players and characters can't provide input or even take control of the game and have their time to shine as well.

 

  • Xenos and Archaeotech is awesome - get hold of some and either use it or sell it for profit, but just don't get caught doing so.

Only the insane have strength enough to prosper.

Only those that prosper may truly judge what is sane.


#7 susanbrindle

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 01:50 AM

26. You'll almost exclusively fight groups of enemies. As such, grenades, flamers, and suppressive fire are worth much more than their weight in dead xenos.

 

27. A basic-quality Conversion Field can be Acquired at a +0 modifier, and grants a 50-50 chance of negating an attack entirely, on top of your dodge. If your character likes surviving, buy one.

 

28. Astropaths should always pick up Compel. It's a power that's useful in a huge variety of situations. Why shoot the guy with the heavy bolter first when you can just Compel him to fire into his friends at Point Blank range?

 

29. Point Blank combat is to be treated with fear and respect. Also utilized whenever profitable.

 

30. Always try to be paid as many times as possible. Save a world from chaos reavers? Loot the enemy and sell what's valuable. Then contact the navy about the ships destroyed, the Ordo Malleus about the daemons destroyed, the Guard about the planet defended, and then if you didn't take a usual route there, contact the Navis Nobilite about the new warp route charted.

 

31. While the techpriests are called priests, and they're in the business of tech, culturally, they actually correspond much more closely to the traditional Wizard archetype. When you think of them as Wizards, it makes a lot more sense that any given Magos tends to live in a tower surrounded by strange experiments, simultaneously zealously guarding his research and planning to demonstrate it at the next big conference of wizards to show everyone his genius. 



#8 MaxWylde

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 12:40 PM

After running a campaign now for about seven months, I have a few points.  

 

  • Organize your game.  Rogue Trader employs a lot of rules, and they're spread out among several books, especially character and ship creation, not to mention rules for such things as mustering and deploying troops, making Acquisitions, psychic and navigator powers, and meta and background endeavours.  What I did was gather everything into a binder that I call the Battlebook, and that has made everything move a lot smoother.  Now I wasn't jumping around looking for this or that chart, this or that rule.  
  • Build your game.  When my players come to any major locale in my version of the Koronus Expanse, I always give them an idea of what they can do when they're there, and I present them a Sheet on the area.  For instance, in Port Wander, I have a list of all the kinds of "official" services and vendors that the PCs can deal with.  If they need repairs, I got a shipyard standing by.  If they need food, water, munitions, etc., I got that standing by.  If they need mercenaries, servitors, even entire starships, I got that too.  Some places have more than others.  All this is is a list, and I have a separate list of all the underworld things that they can get access to in various ways.  In addition, I have some general idea of who it is that runs some of these vendors, in case the PCs want to haggle, or worse.  
  • Villains!!!  Make a villain for your PCs, and a good place to start is the Enemy of the Rogue Trader PC if he took Nobleborn or Chosen of Dynasty.  This Enemy has to be in the game you're running, and he's got to be a nemesis.  This is vitally important; without enemies, your games can devolve into an economic trade game like Monopoly.  
  • Try to give the PCs a sand-box feel to the game.  You don't actually have to have a sand-box approach, but at the very least it gives the PCs options, and they like options, even if there isn't many of them.  I run a sand-box, and I know who the major players are in the Expanse, and what they're going to do month to month, year to year, and why, and this is so that if and/or when the PCs begin to interfere, that's when the world responds.  I try to present at least one Grand Endeavour for the PCs to go for, as well as five or six lesser ones to choose from.  


#9 Cpt. Harkonnen

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Posted 01 May 2013 - 07:52 PM

32: Rogue Trader is NOT Dark Heresy, dont try to compare the two and other than the basics, you must unlearn what you have learned.






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