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Question about ford and forest


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#1 Sokoov

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Posted 08 May 2012 - 08:08 AM

Hi,

 

I have one ittle question about ford and forest hex. In rulebook we can read "Movement: infantry must stop when entering". What does it exactly mean? When I move my, for example, green infantry unit for two hex can I still attack? Or "stop when entering" means that I can do nothing?



#2 vyrago

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Posted 08 May 2012 - 11:25 AM

Yes, you can still attack.  the unit just has to stop its movement, thats all. 



#3 KenToad

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Posted 08 May 2012 - 04:14 PM

Also, Units can Advance or Pursue out of Forest hexes on the same turn that they moved in and had to stop.  Also, don't stop when Units are retreating.  Stop when Units in Pursuit enter a new forest.



#4 Sokoov

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Posted 08 May 2012 - 08:42 PM

Good, so all clear, thanks



#5 Rashley

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Posted 09 May 2012 - 10:05 PM

This is one of those strange things that happen in boardgames with sequential turns.  If you can get your units in the right places (tactics?), then you can virtually ignore these 'obstacles'.  Other strange things turn up as well.  Being in some terrain reduces normal maximum die rolls to 2.  Therefore 'Green' units are unaffected but the 'better' units are penalised!  It doesn't spoil the game much, and is all part of the 'tactics', but reducing die rolls would have been better.  It is all down to the very difficult parts of simulating extremely complicated battles into a game.  Still love the game!  Cheers!



#6 North_Wolf

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Posted 12 May 2012 - 08:43 AM

Making green units not take a penalty for being in rough terrain is actually a very clever rule to simulate what kind of troops they are. 

Green units with their speed and general lack of staying power are basicly scouts and skirmishers, troop types that need to make good use of the land and their own mobility.

Battle of the Teutoburg Forest is a good example of light troops (Gauls) slaughtering heavier units (Romans). 

 

 



#7 vyrago

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Posted 13 May 2012 - 05:45 PM

 An excellent point, Green troops don't always represent poor or inexperienced troops.  It may mean they have light weapons and armor, for example.  As pointed out, they are great as scouts or skirmishers.  Able to quickly exploit a flank or race ahead to tie up an enemy unit.

 



#8 SolennelBern

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Posted 03 July 2012 - 06:59 AM

Rashley said:

This is one of those strange things that happen in boardgames with sequential turns.  If you can get your units in the right places (tactics?), then you can virtually ignore these 'obstacles'.  Other strange things turn up as well.  Being in some terrain reduces normal maximum die rolls to 2.  Therefore 'Green' units are unaffected but the 'better' units are penalised!  It doesn't spoil the game much, and is all part of the 'tactics', but reducing die rolls would have been better.  It is all down to the very difficult parts of simulating extremely complicated battles into a game.  Still love the game!  Cheers!

Well thematically, the Green nuits are considered light armored…so maybe they're simply more agile so they don't suffer when attacking in a forest but the Red Heavy armored unit could get stuck in mud due to it's heaviness :P

Green units are weak enough as they're in combat so removing 1 die in a forest would make them simple and boring fodders.



#9 North_Wolf

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Posted 19 July 2012 - 03:39 AM

A skirmisher infantry for example, could be considered to even wear the same armor as a red unit, but operate in smaller numbers and being more dispersed. 

This type of formation, covers more ground (staying in formation slows units), is used to fighting dispersed (wont miss the lack of mutual support from harsh ground like woods) and is expected to fulfill a particular role (flanking, rushing into places, or simple reconesence).   They still take the same amount of space (4 units in a hex) but each figure could be assumed to have less fighting potential then a red one.

This type of unit could be elite rather then new recruits, but becouse it serves a particular function its designated green.  Maege Mormont (with her green infantry) is a good example of this (expecially with her ability to attack twice).  Most likely the the low number of her elite bodyguards is what causes them to take such heavy casulties from attacks (even a few kills will increase the proportion of casulties making them the equivilant of a green unit). 

For the most part however, we can still assume that lighter armor or heavier armor is what causes the change.

 

This is one of the things I really love about this game.  It deals with rather complex millitary considerations (diffrent troop qualities) in a simple way that isnt burdened with extra rules but still gives you all the tactical potential of having unit variety.  Even if heavy units have the most staying power, then armies (on purpose and not due to lack of equipment) used a mix of units to give them tactical flexability on the battlefield.

 

 






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